PDA

View Full Version : Must have books.



Opus Magnum
10-05-2009, 06:28 PM
Hello. So in the summer I'm going to spend about $200 to Alchemy books. I'm interested in Alchemy symbolism (because I want to learn how to read strange Alchemy pictures) and I want some good read about Philosopher's Stone. So, can you recommend me some books which I have to buy?

horticult
10-05-2009, 10:11 PM
Do not waste time and money and download 4 free some classics like Basil Valentine, Paracelsus, Trismosin, Philalethes, Hermes, Geber, Welling, Pernety, Lullus, Turba ... and maybe Fulcanelli.

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 04:25 AM
where to download them?

horticult
10-06-2009, 08:47 AM
Use google!
rexresearch.com
levity.com

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 12:39 PM
Could you say some titles of the books, not even authors? :) Because I don't know what to download if I want to learn symbolism and about the Philosopher's Stone

Salazius
10-06-2009, 02:26 PM
Read everything you can :)

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 03:13 PM
Do you know where can I buy cheap books? I don't like reading ebooks...

horticult
10-06-2009, 03:50 PM
These are not ebooks but mostly html and pdf. Print them.
And if you like to know symbolism read the whole bible /good edition/ and greek mythology.

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 04:03 PM
Greek mythology? If so, what about Egyptian? Didn't Alchemy begin in Egypt?

horticult
10-06-2009, 04:40 PM
Well, classic authors used mostly these as a material to throw traps for neofyts, but egyptians materials are also recommended...

Salazius
10-06-2009, 04:41 PM
Well, on Amazon sometime you can have cheap book via other seller in used books.
RAMS Cd's or DVD are perfect also, but you will need to print them.

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 04:52 PM
Okay, with symbolism done. Now what is a good read about Philosopher's Stone?

horticult
10-06-2009, 05:32 PM
Thats a big problem, everybody would like to know the best; but as was said, read everything you can; one author explains another, across centuries, as classic wrote.
On the end you will realise that without Gods revelation are all these books good for nothing.

Opus Magnum
10-06-2009, 05:56 PM
What about this http://jwmt.org/v2n14/greatalchemical_review.html ?

Zephyr
10-06-2009, 07:40 PM
I like hard-copy books also. I just ordered a bunch... among them The Golden Game (http://www.amazon.com/Golden-Game-Alchemical-Engravings-Seventeenth/dp/0500279810), a collection of interesting alchemical engravings.
*Z*
:cool:

Poimandres
10-06-2009, 08:04 PM
In terms of must haves...there are two books that stand out in my library.

1. Rene Guenon "Symbols of Sacred Science"
2. Julius Evola "The Hermetic Tradition"

Hands down some of the most influential books in my present work. Both are very dense, rather verbose, and definitely not "easy" reads... but as far as I am concerned, they are pure Gold!

horticult
10-06-2009, 09:36 PM
I would recommend only authors who did IT!

Opus Magnum
10-07-2009, 04:26 AM
I would recommend only authors who did IT!

Did what? Made Philosopher's Stone? If so, I'm agree with you. If the author have so many good info about the stone, why didn't he make it? I prefer books which authors are something like Flamel.

Awani
10-07-2009, 02:26 PM
I'm interested in Alchemy symbolism (because I want to learn how to read strange Alchemy pictures)...

Why not order one of these:

Study Courses on alchemical texts and symbolism (http://www.alchemywebsite.com/bookshop/study_course.html) by Adam McLean

They are not too expensive.

:cool:

Opus Magnum
10-07-2009, 04:56 PM
Why not order one of these:

Study Courses on alchemical texts and symbolism (http://www.alchemywebsite.com/bookshop/study_course.html) by Adam McLean

They are not too expensive.

:cool:

thanks :) looks interesting

solomon levi
10-22-2009, 12:19 PM
There's a lot of books that cover different angles on alchemy.
Here are some of my favorites:

For beginners, a good history is nice to have. There are lots of good
books written on specific alchemists or Jewish alchemy or Indian alchemy,
etc. So for a nice intro I'll list three:
"Alchemy and Alchemists" by Sean Martin
"Alchemy" by E.J. Holmyard
"Alchemy" by Titus Burckhardt

There's also a couple "coffee table" type books that fall into that last category:
"Secrets of the Alchemists" by the editors of Time-Life books
"Alchemy, the Ancient Science" by Neil Powell
Another "coffee table" book that is quite broader than just alchemy and
very good is
"The Secret Teachings of All Ages" by Manly P. Hall

For symbols and images:
"The Alchemical Mandala" by Adam McLean
"Alchemy and Mysticism" by Alexander Roob
"Alchemy, the Secret Art" by Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
"The Golden Game" by same as above

There are a couple dictionaries of alchemy you might find useful. I don't
use mine much, but two of them are:
"The Dictionary of Alchemy" by Mark Haeffner
"The dictionary of alchemy" by Diana Fernando

Probably a better dictionary is the one by Antoine Pernety.

On symbols, but in a place all its own, we must include Fulcanelli:
Mystere de Cathedrals, and Dwellings of the Philosophers

For spiritual or inner alchemy, my favorite is
"The Hermetic Tradition" by Julias Evola
Many people like "Initiation into Hermetics" by Franz Bardon
Another one is "Seven Hermetic Letters" by Georg Lomer
Mark Stavish is a practical alchemist who also writes on spiritual subjects.
Another book is "The Tower of Alchemy" by David Goddard (personally
don't care for it).
One that isn't specifically alchemy, but I really like is
"The True and Invisible Rosicrucian Order" by Paul Foster Case

Now the Classics:
Besides Fulcanelli,
"The Hermetic Museum" by A.E. Waite
"Triumphal Chariot of Antimony" by Basil Valentine
"Collectanea Chemica" by A.E. Waite
"The Art of Distillation" by John French
"The Great Art" by Antoine Pernety
"Golden Manuscripts" by Frater Albertus
"The Alchemists Handbook" also Frater Albertus
Commentary on Mutus Liber by Adam McLean
Compendium of Alchemical Processes - anonymous
and my personal favorite:
18th Century Chemistry as it Relates to Alchemy

RAMS digital library is a must!

Recent contemporary practical alchemists:
Robert Alan Bartlett - "Real Alchemy" and "The Way of the Crucible"
The Weiser concise guide to Alchemy by Brian Cotnoir
Complete Idiot's guide to Alchemy by William Hauck
One of the best IMO is "The Practical Handbook of Plant Alchemy" by Manfred Junius

You might want to get a good herbal:
Culpepper's is very popular and has astrological assignments.
Weiner's Herbal is a good one also IMO.

You might want to study astrology.

You might want to study Hermeticism:
"The Kybalion" and "The Hermetica" are good works

Also a nice book on rocks and minerals that gives you their composition.
I like "A Pocket guide to Rocks and Minerals" by James Lagomarsino

An understanding of chemistry and the periodic table is helpful.
Also one of those big fat CRC handbook of chemistry is handy for pH,
boiling points, melting points, chemical compositions, solubility, etc...


I think that about covers it. ;)

Opus Magnum
10-22-2009, 04:20 PM
There's a lot of books that cover different angles on alchemy.
Here are some of my favorites:

For beginners, a good history is nice to have. There are lots of good
books written on specific alchemists or Jewish alchemy or Indian alchemy,
etc. So for a nice intro I'll list three:
"Alchemy and Alchemists" by Sean Martin
"Alchemy" by E.J. Holmyard
"Alchemy" by Titus Burckhardt

There's also a couple "coffee table" type books that fall into that last category:
"Secrets of the Alchemists" by the editors of Time-Life books
"Alchemy, the Ancient Science" by Neil Powell
Another "coffee table" book that is quite broader than just alchemy and
very good is
"The Secret Teachings of All Ages" by Manly P. Hall

For symbols and images:
"The Alchemical Mandala" by Adam McLean
"Alchemy and Mysticism" by Alexander Roob
"Alchemy, the Secret Art" by Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
"The Golden Game" by same as above

There are a couple dictionaries of alchemy you might find useful. I don't
use mine much, but two of them are:
"The Dictionary of Alchemy" by Mark Haeffner
"The dictionary of alchemy" by Diana Fernando

Probably a better dictionary is the one by Antoine Pernety.

On symbols, but in a place all its own, we must include Fulcanelli:
Mystere de Cathedrals, and Dwellings of the Philosophers

For spiritual or inner alchemy, my favorite is
"The Hermetic Tradition" by Julias Evola
Many people like "Initiation into Hermetics" by Franz Bardon
Another one is "Seven Hermetic Letters" by Georg Lomer
Mark Stavish is a practical alchemist who also writes on spiritual subjects.
Another book is "The Tower of Alchemy" by David Goddard (personally
don't care for it).
One that isn't specifically alchemy, but I really like is
"The True and Invisible Rosicrucian Order" by Paul Foster Case

Now the Classics:
Besides Fulcanelli,
"The Hermetic Museum" by A.E. Waite
"Triumphal Chariot of Antimony" by Basil Valentine
"Collectanea Chemica" by A.E. Waite
"The Art of Distillation" by John French
"The Great Art" by Antoine Pernety
"Golden Manuscripts" by Frater Albertus
"The Alchemists Handbook" also Frater Albertus
Commentary on Mutus Liber by Adam McLean
Compendium of Alchemical Processes - anonymous
and my personal favorite:
18th Century Chemistry as it Relates to Alchemy

RAMS digital library is a must!

Recent contemporary practical alchemists:
Robert Alan Bartlett - "Real Alchemy" and "The Way of the Crucible"
The Weiser concise guide to Alchemy by Brian Cotnoir
Complete Idiot's guide to Alchemy by William Hauck
One of the best IMO is "The Practical Handbook of Plant Alchemy" by Manfred Junius

You might want to get a good herbal:
Culpepper's is very popular and has astrological assignments.
Weiner's Herbal is a good one also IMO.

You might want to study astrology.

You might want to study Hermeticism:
"The Kybalion" and "The Hermetica" are good works

Also a nice book on rocks and minerals that gives you their composition.
I like "A Pocket guide to Rocks and Minerals" by James Lagomarsino

An understanding of chemistry and the periodic table is helpful.
Also one of those big fat CRC handbook of chemistry is handy for pH,
boiling points, melting points, chemical compositions, solubility, etc...


I think that about covers it. ;)

:eek::eek::eek::eek: thank you :eek: you are very kind

solomon levi
10-23-2009, 03:00 PM
You're welcome. :)
You can find a lot of those on line if you don't need the hard copy.