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solomon levi
10-07-2009, 06:03 PM
You should be well familiar with the Minor work, as this gives the info on the process.
See here:
http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?t=335

The Major work is a repetition of the process, only the materials are different.
If the ingredients for the plant circulatum are plant salt (potassium carbonate),
essential oil from any plant, the secret boosting ingredient (pine resins, specifically
turpentine), and spiritus vini (alcohol),
then with what would we substitute these for the mineral work?
Here's my opinion, yet to be tried:
mineral salt = oxides
oil = oil, oil of copper for example.
boost.... this is the tough one. I imagine it could be the oil/sulphur of iron as is
hinted at in the antimony work. But it could be mercury.
for the "mercury", Frater Albertus tells us that normal SV is not sufficient for the
mineral work. I suspect KM would be a fine substitute.


Thoughts anyone?

Ab Roek
10-08-2009, 02:17 AM
Solomon,

Good thinking. What you are calling the "boosting agent" in the vegetable kingdom is the fixed sulphur. The volatile sulphur of the vegetable kingdom is not complete without this fixed sulphur, and in fact they only exist apart from each other by a kind of artificial abstraction.

In order to make a mineral kingdom analog, you would need to identify the fixed and volatile sulphurs of the mineral kingdom. The mineral salts are easily identified. The mineral mercury is not so easily identified, I think. Becker seems to think it is Acetone. I am not so sure myself, although reading Das Aceton gives some interesting experiments certainly.

solomon levi
10-09-2009, 01:52 AM
Solomon,

Good thinking. What you are calling the "boosting agent" in the vegetable kingdom is the fixed sulphur. The volatile sulphur of the vegetable kingdom is not complete without this fixed sulphur, and in fact they only exist apart from each other by a kind of artificial abstraction.

In order to make a mineral kingdom analog, you would need to identify the fixed and volatile sulphurs of the mineral kingdom. The mineral salts are easily identified. The mineral mercury is not so easily identified, I think. Becker seems to think it is Acetone. I am not so sure myself, although reading Das Aceton gives some interesting experiments certainly.

Thanks for that.
The need of the fixed sulphur would give credence to the oil of iron theory then,
like the iron nails that fix christ to the cross. ;)

It seems Sharkey was able to eliminate the volatile sulphur, the essential oil and just combine
the turpentine and sel tartar.

Keep in mind Dr. Geoffrey's quick and simply dry method of heating the salt
and imbibing the hot salt with the fixed sulphur. This produces the volatile alkali in a matter of minutes.

If this same can be applied to minerals, heating the oxide and then imbibing with oil of iron may
do the same, then we only need a suitable mercury to digest or distill it with.

solomon levi
10-10-2009, 09:23 PM
Here may be a hint from Junius:

"Mercury connects and mediates. Water as well as essential oils are soluble
in ethyl alcohol, while essential oils float atop water. As Mercury generates
both, they all dissolve into one another, just as metals (iron excepted) dissolve
into quicksilver. With quicksilver we can amalgamate metals. Ethyl alcohol
'amalgamates' in the plant world and is therefore considered the Mercury
or quicksilver of the plant kingdom."

jnjone4
10-14-2009, 12:03 PM
"Keep in mind Dr. Geoffrey's quick and simply dry method of heating the salt
and imbibing the hot salt with the fixed sulphur. This produces the volatile alkali in a matter of minutes." Hi, I've looked but can't find any reference to Dr. Geoffrey in the threads. Would you be so kind as to point out where I could obtain his process. Thanks

solomon levi
10-14-2009, 06:47 PM
Oops. I spelled his name wrong. Dr. Geoffroy.

Here it is:

http://books.google.com/books?id=OU5343CoQrAC&pg=PA133&dq=Sharkey%27s+soap#v=onepage&q=Sharkey's%20soap&f=false

:)

jnjone4
10-14-2009, 08:25 PM
Thank you Solomon Levi, that is a great help.

Fireball
10-17-2009, 11:55 AM
If we work with the plant kingdom, we can use potassium carbonate obtained from the dried and calcined plant and essential oil of that particular plant.

The only question is how the essential oil (sulphur) can be united with the hot salt (as per Dr. Geoffroy's method) without boiling away or burning?

The flash point of most essential oils is around 60 - 100 degrees C, while the salt becomes red and opened at much higher temperatures...

Solomon, have you found distilled vinegar to work better than turpentine in making Starkey's Soap?

solomon levi
10-19-2009, 06:20 PM
Solomon, have you found distilled vinegar to work better than turpentine in making Starkey's Soap?

I'm sure I tried that, but I don't recall the results.
Hmmm. Maybe I didn't try it yet, but i will soon and I'll let you know.

It seems it would be more difficult to get as good a product with all the
water in vinegar, even if you freeze it a couple times.


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