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solomon levi
10-10-2009, 11:13 PM
While fermentation is fairly understood in the plant kingdom,
not so much with minerals.
The vinegar of antimony is one such preparation, one mineral that
will ferment in water if left for a year or so.

Glauber mentions his "secret ferment" that will cause fermentation to
occur very rapidly. I'm not sure what his secret ferment
consists of, but I had the realisation today that it would probably involve
carbon, as sugar is the ferment of the vegetable kingdom, and sugar is
basically carbon.

If sugar causes fermentation in vegetables, will carbon cause it in minerals?
Carbon is strongly related to the idea of phlogiston, and to oxygen.
Carbon's strong attraction for oxygen can cause 'suffocation', fermentation and death.

Has anyone else given any thought to this?

Fireball
10-17-2009, 07:04 PM
Isn't that oxidation or corrosion is the fermentation of mineral kingdom?

Salazius
10-18-2009, 05:35 PM
No, 'fermentatio' comes with 'putrefactio' in alchemy, not oxydation. This is not the same process, aluminium oxide is white, but a putrefied aluminium is black, like any metal in putrefaction.

For the Alchemist, putrefying a metal in done in an instant. (snap!) Or in few days, depending the Method and the goals.
Water and antimony is obviously not the easy way.

Ghislain
10-18-2009, 09:22 PM
Previously I was executing a process that required electrolysis, although I got the cathode and anode mixed up and dissolved a stainless steel knife. The result was a...
black sludge (http://genius.toucansurf.com/knife sludge.jpg) .

Would this be putrefied Iron? If it is it only took about 15 minutes to produce. I am pretty sure it is as I have washed the NaCl out of the mess and dried the remaining sediment...I tested the resulting dark red/brown powder and it proved to be magnetic.

What type of iron oxide this is I can not say...

Typically, the iron(II) oxide pigment is black, while the iron(III) oxide is red or rust-colored. (Iron compounds other than oxides can have other colors.)Source (para 4.) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_oxide#Uses)

From this I would deduce that I have a mixture of oxides, which one would expect from stainless steel.

I tried out the same process with aluminium. I acquired a lot of whiteish powder which I presume to be aluminium oxide...however I was trying to produce aluminium powder...unsuccessfully :( I can't remember what colour the precipitate was before I washed it, so I can't confirm it was black as Sal' said. Maybe I'll try again.

Ghislain

Ghislain
10-18-2009, 11:42 PM
In the process above I was using electrical carbon brushes as the anode.

Ghislain

Salazius
10-19-2009, 10:45 AM
Electrolysis is not a secret fire in my opinion. So you did not produced a putrefaction I think.

Ghislain
10-19-2009, 03:03 PM
Do you think that the inclusion of carbon as one of the electrodes may have supplied the secret fire, but accelerated by the use of an electrical current.

This would fit with what Sol' said:


"While fermentation is fairly understood in the plant kingdom,
not so much with minerals.
The vinegar of antimony is one such preparation, one mineral that
will ferment in water if left for a year or so.

Glauber mentions his "secret ferment" that will cause fermentation to
occur very rapidly. I'm not sure what his secret ferment
consists of, but I had the realisation today that it would probably involve
carbon, as sugar is the ferment of the vegetable kingdom, and sugar is
basically carbon.

If sugar causes fermentation in vegetables, will carbon cause it in minerals?
Carbon is strongly related to the idea of phlogiston, and to oxygen.
Carbon's strong attraction for oxygen can cause 'suffocation', fermentation and death. "

Ghislain

Salazius
10-19-2009, 04:43 PM
I absolutely don't know if carbon can play a role in what you've done.

solomon levi
10-23-2009, 11:12 AM
Philalethes hath said, "You must know that to transmute things a corruptive ferment is required, in which respect all other salts give place to the strong urinous salt."

Fireball
10-23-2009, 11:47 AM
Philalethes hath said, "You must know that to transmute things a corruptive ferment is required, in which respect all other salts give place to the strong urinous salt."

O! That seems right! As we told, there is something special in the fluids of human body!