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True Initiate
10-17-2009, 03:35 AM
Finally in english!

http://www.cista.net/Houses/

pneumatician
12-31-2010, 02:42 AM
don't lost your time reading this or your next book/step end in harry potter's saga :-)))

Andro
12-31-2010, 01:04 PM
don't lost your time reading this or your next book/step end in harry potter's saga :-)))

If I may ask - what brought you to this conclusion?

And how is reading this book going to result/end in 'Harry Potter's Saga'?


full'french'shit

I heard French shit makes better compost than US shit. Something in the diet, perhaps... But then again, maybe it's just a rumor...

Salazius
01-01-2011, 10:39 AM
What's your problem with Fulcanelli and The Hairy Pootter saga ? Can you explain a little bit more ?

Personnaly, I see not problem reading HP and ending with Fulca, or the reverse thing...

Andro, yes, a question of diet for sure !

Aleilius
01-02-2011, 03:30 AM
don't lost your time reading this or your next book/step end in harry potter's saga :-)))

No, what I think you meant is to not waste our time by reading your shit. ;)

I don't like HP, but I'm a big fan of Fulcanelli. Just because it's not intelligble to you, or the layman, doesn't mean it isn't for others.

pneumatician
01-02-2011, 11:55 PM
[QUOTE=Androgynus;12512]If I may ask - what brought you to this conclusion?

well, very easy. I only need to see the book title, author's name or the covers for known if is a good book or crap. if the covers have nothing i need to open the book :-)))

And how is reading this book going to result/end in 'Harry Potter's Saga'?

hey, when the finger points to the moon...

nobody get anything of positive reading fullca, but many 'alchemist' also read HarryP :-))

fulcanelly is a natiolalist talking of 'france' like if this state is born after the big bang... hey, france is a modern invent like spain... who can read their books and say: this guy are saying the truth ???

Hendaya cross are in Euskal Herria (Basque country, the most ancient nation of europe and not in this s??? of 'France') 'France' is full of nations like Occitania, Corsica, Catalonia, Bretanya... this 'omission' or delusional imperialist fantasies leads me to this conclusion. also the book is full de crap, traps, nonsense...
but as I said the name 'fulcanelli' is bad, the ttitle more bad... not good vibes, capiche ? :)

bye bye,

vega33
01-03-2011, 10:21 AM
@pneumatician: Such fine logical statements! Such eminent arguments for debate!

May I suggest you get back to us when you learn to construct a proper English sentence (as well as learning how to spell "Fulcanelli")?

This whole thread is great... all this talk of "full french shit" makes me think of Philalethes and his dung heap.

Srsly, I would have provided some logically thought out arguments to counter this, but the author of the above has made it much too easy to point a finger and laugh. Perhaps someone could offer a commentary about one or another aspect such as his translucent definition of the salt of the wise. :)

Aleilius
01-03-2011, 10:24 AM
This thread makes me laugh. :D

Salazius
01-03-2011, 04:44 PM
The problem with "pneumatician" is that it's all air ...

I think that sooner or later, a pneumatician will soon vanish if there is no effort made, 'poushh' ... , just my feeling about your bad vibe, bye bye !

The moderator n2.

solomon levi
01-04-2011, 03:50 AM
Why should Fulcanelli deserve special attention?
Burn ALL the books! :) (and whiten you laton)

Yes - commenting (so harshly) on a book you haven't read???
Not the wisest thing.

i only know nothing
04-03-2013, 08:05 PM
Hello

Wondering if someone could help with this, maybe someone that has the original text, as I only have available to me what seems to be the same online text copied several times, but in Dwellings of The Philosophers, Fulcanelli or perhaps the editor or translators places notes in parenthesis, with an asterisk, in some editions three asterisks followed by a three digit number, foloowed by a dash an usually another single digit number, which seem to point back to a bibliography or something, here is an example: "The Greek [*520-2] (Luchas), from [*520-3] (Luchnos), light,
lamp, torch, lucis in Latin), brings us to consider the Gospel according to Luke, as the
Gospel according to the Light."

Does any one know where these point back to? [*-520-2]???

The book is supposed to be 520 plus pages but the pdf and online version accessible through the web only have about 248 pages...any help?

Illen A. Cluf
04-04-2013, 10:53 AM
The first number in the square bracket refers to the page number of the actual English translation book (which has 550 pages). The second number refers to the second referenced Greek word on that page, which is written in Greek characters in the book. The English equivalent is written immediately after the square bracket in the electronic version. There are numerous transcription errors in the electronic version, so it's always preferable to have the actual book.

i only know nothing
04-04-2013, 06:43 PM
Yes thank you, I will have to buy the book now, they are expensive.

Illen A. Cluf
04-05-2013, 02:08 AM
It's worth it. I've learned more from that book than from almost any other alchemy book, although the Golden Chain comes close. I must have read Dwellings close to ten times. Each time I learn something new.

thoth
04-05-2013, 09:46 PM
It took me a year to read Dwellings, very slowly, about one page per night, with detailed notes, around 10 yrs ago. That was when I knew a lot less so it mostly wnet over my head, but I plan to have a second run shortly.

Illen A. Cluf
04-06-2013, 01:08 PM
The first time for me was also close to ten years ago. It took me a long time and I made pages and pages of notes. Each re-reading took less time, but I would make new notes of the points that didn't seem important earlier. I also made a glossary of terms, and their numerous different names, which really helped in subsequent readings. I also made notes of the steps of the dry and wet processes, which were buried all over the book in no particular order. Fulcanelli will talk about one particular theme quite thoroughly, but he breaks the discussion into many pieces, scattered throughout the book. The trick is to put all these pieces together in the right order and in a coherent whole. The electronic version really helps in this regard since you can search for key words from your glossary. Another important thing to do is to locate some of the more important references he mentions and read them as well. The several Forewards/Prefaces made by Canseliet to the various editions of the book are also very helpful, but unfortunately are not included in the electronic version.

thoth
04-06-2013, 03:25 PM
Yea, the way he scatters the processes - its a bit like Isis trying to gather all the bits of Osirus body and put them all back together again.

I also read the other texts he mentions like Cylini - which you could almost think were written by same author. I also went through all the Greek mythology he refers to such as Tiresias /Thales/Melacampus etc

Illen A. Cluf
04-06-2013, 04:27 PM
Yea, the way he scatters the processes - its a bit like Isis trying to gather all the bits of Osirus body and put them all back together again.

That's a good way of describing it.


I also read the other texts he mentions like Cylini - which you could almost think were written by same author.

Cyliani was an important source for Fulcanelli as was the works by Philalethes and many others. But, according to a Preface in his "Le Mystere des Cathedrales", his first initiator was Basil Valentine. However, he seems to mention Flamel more often in his book than any other alchemist (68 times compared to 49 times for Valentine and 46 times for Philalethes).