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Phoenix
01-03-2009, 06:54 PM
This is a Phoenix-thread (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?t=7) from the old site (http://alchemy-forums.forumotion.com/forum.htm) created by stevenmagus.

This is a very interesting book on alchemy with both its historical and religious roots.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/skyecn/

Download PDF (http://members.optusnet.com.au/skyecn/AlchemyKey18ed.pdf)

Enjoy,
Steven Magus
Interesting book, but I find it's riddled with various errors.

Take this for example:


I made my Philosophers’ Stone by heating Dead Sea water and then titrating it with Sodium Hydroxide to form a precipitate at about pH 8.5, drawing-off the salt water with a syringe and washing the precipitate a few times with distilled water. As it settled in the bottom of the wine glass, my precipitate looked just like Melchizedek’s stone. I gazed at my precipitate, knowing that the thirty-day Egyptian rite of passage required five hundred milligrams of this substance per day.

My stone is probably seventy percent gold and thirty percent magnesium hydroxide, which is Milk of Magnesia. I can isolate the gold if I want to, by drying the precipitate to a powder and then
mixing it with hydrochloric acid. Anything that does not dissolve is the pure manna or Philosophers’ Stone.

I doubt the whole gold and Dead Sea salt mess. It's more likely most of the precipitate is merely insoluble hydroxides. Wikipedia says this about the composition of Dead Sea salt.


The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water. The exact composition of the Dead Sea water varies with season, depth, temperature and so on. The concentration of ionic species (in g/kg) of Dead Sea surface water in the early 1980s was found to be: Cl− (181.4), Br− (4.2), SO42− (0.4), HCO3− (0.2), Ca2+ (14.1), Na+ (32.5), K+ (6.2) and Mg2+ (35.2). The total salinity was 276 g/kg.[8] These results show that w/w% composition of the salt, as anhydrous chlorides, was calcium chloride (CaCl2) 14.4%, potassium chloride (KCl) 4.4%, magnesium chloride (MgCl2) 50.8% and sodium chloride (common salt, NaCl) 30.4%. In comparison, the salt in the water of most oceans and seas is approximately 97% sodium chloride. The concentration of sulfate, SO42−, ions is very low, and the bromide ion, Br− concentration is the highest of all waters on Earth.

We see it contains Ca2, Na, K, and Mg2. These will turn into hydroxides with the addition of sodium hydroxide. We'll have calcium hydroxide which is slightly soluble in water, then sodium hydrodixe (soluble), potassium hydroxide (soluble), and magnesium hydroxide (insoluble). This will be the LARGE majority of the precipitate, but there may be trace amounts of other hydroxides or impurities.

The precipitate may contain some gold, but definitely not 70%. Also, the precipitate should be purified in order to remove the hydroxides. These could result in possibly harm over an extended amount of time. The best way to determine the total percentage of gold in Dead Sea salt is to precipitate with sodium hydroxide, centrifuge and remove the liquid, dry the solid, and then take weight measurements. Next add nitric acid, this should dissolve most of the impurities and leave only the supposed gold. The nitric acid solution can be centrifuged and then removed via decanting. Try to remove as much nitric acid as possible, then dry the powder and take weight measurements. Compare the amount of insoluble materials from the nitric acid step to the original amount to obtain a percentage. This should work even if the gold is in the ORME state since we're not really manipulating or messing with it, just the other insolubles.

I may do this in the future and figure out whether or not the hearsay is true.
BeautifulEvil,

I never tried to do any of the alchemical/chemistry experiments in listed in the book, mainly for lack of equipment. Would you say that the book is also riddled with background / historical errors as well, this is one of the main reasons I liked the book?

Thanks,
Steven Magus
Hi, stevenmagus, I noticed it had alot of background/historical information regarding alchemy and the philosophers' stone, but sadly I haven't had enough time to read those parts.

So really, I can't say for sure if that part contains errors, and I really don't want to come out and say "it has errors" without having read it all. Let me skim through it some tonight and then I'll make an assumption based on what I've read. It's really the best I can do at this point.

You're right though, I probably wouldn't use this book for any of the experiments, bur rather the historical information.

The precipitate may contain some gold, but definitely not 70%. Also, the precipitate should be purified in order to remove the hydroxides. These could result in possibly harm over an extended amount of time. The best way to determine the total percentage of gold in Dead Sea salt is to precipitate with sodium hydroxide, centrifuge and remove the liquid, dry the solid, and then take weight measurements. Next add nitric acid, this should dissolve most of the impurities and leave only the supposed gold. The nitric acid solution can be centrifuged and then removed via decanting. Try to remove as much nitric acid as possible, then dry the powder and take weight measurements. Compare the amount of insoluble materials from the nitric acid step to the original amount to obtain a percentage. This should work even if the gold is in the ORME state since we're not really manipulating or messing with it, just the other insolubles.

I may do this in the future and figure out whether or not the hearsay is true.

According to the Essene, Dead sea precipitate is 90% monoatomic gold.
I don't know if that's actually true.
Yes, you should eliminate the hydroxides to get a really good white powder that will take you out of your body.

According to the Essene, Dead sea precipitate is 90% monoatomic gold.
I don't know if that's actually true.
Yes, you should eliminate the hydroxides to get a really good white powder that will take you out of your body.

I ordered some Dead Sea salt a few days ago, not that much, should be enough to play with though. I've been reading about purifying the precipitate lately, and I feel pretty confident about the procedures. However I've heard the Dead Sea precipitate won't contain any Gilcrest precipitate that would occur if the pH overshoots 10.78. I'm just ready to receive some kind of validation as to whether or not this claim is true or not.

I've been going to and fro about my opinion of this m-state phenomena. I've heard both sides of the argument, and I think I'm ready to stamp it as 100% true. It will be nice to confirm this, because then I can continue with my work. It will make things much more interesting, that's for sure.

I've changed my opinion on this m-state phenomena a few times, and you can probably spot inconsistencies throughout my posting history.

Awani
01-09-2009, 09:52 AM
According to the Essene, Dead sea precipitate is 90% monoatomic gold.
I don't know if that's actually true.I have gone for a swim in the Dead Sea, does that do me any good then you think? Or is it only internally that m-gold has any effect?

:confused:

You have to wash off the salt anyway after you've been in the Dead Sea or you'll suffer pains and arrows, or so the guide said anyway!