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Joshua
03-04-2010, 12:04 AM
Hi folks,

Most recently, I have been researching the high energy solvents useful in alchemy. After a huge amount of reading and correlating very old texts, and putting my deductions to the test, I have finally been able to effectively create the philosopher's mercury (via two separate processes). It is a clear elemental liquid at room temperature with the characteristics indicated in the old texts. I have also learned the preparation and use of a few other high energy solvents (some are organic compounds) that reduce metals to a high-energy allotropic state. I want to encourage you to joyfully persevere. Alchemy is real.

Now I start my next phase. I have decided to follow my heart and stop messing around with online marketing and SEO. I have decided that I will continue my research and development full-time. I believe that I will quickly find an individual or group that will be interested in helping me to develop this further and help figure out the best way to help the world with my research, someone who will be able to complement my strengths and weaknesses. I really don't want to do alchemy alone anymore. If you know someone who might be interested, perhaps you could pass on my info, or give me a call yourself at 503-305-3773 (USA).

That's it for now. I still have a lot of work to do. I wish you the best in your projects and you will probably see me more regularly here in the forum.

Be blessed!

Josh

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 12:47 AM
Welcome back Josh, nice to meet you.

Interested to hear about your mercuries.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 01:00 AM
Can you stick your finger in it without being harmed?

Joshua
03-04-2010, 01:08 AM
Hi LR,

Thanks. Gosh, I'm not really sure what to say about the mercury that I have produced or how much I should tell openly. Once you know what you are looking for and the basic process, you can find a significant number of variations used and written about by various alchemists to produce the clear mercurial liquid. It is just one thing, a pure element that is changed into a volatile clear liquid allotrope. It is pretty, too. :-) I don't have much of it (I generally experiment with small amounts), but I can make more at will and processes should scale quite easily.

Best regards,

Josh

Joshua
03-04-2010, 01:13 AM
I have not stuck my finger in it so I don't know. :-)

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 01:13 AM
Strange you should mention two paths to produce it Josh. I wondering if these are the same two paths that I know. Most of my work is theoretical, and I don't experiment very often, but I'm interested in your knowledge on this subject.

It wouldn't be wise to say very much in such a public place, or at all really. I also don't think it would be very wise to offer this for sale, but that's my take on the issue. You may curse me all you want! ;)

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 01:14 AM
I have not stuck my finger in it so I don't know. :-)
I've heard this mentioned as one test for the philosophical mercury. It should also "dissolve" gold in a philosophical, non-violent, manner.

Also, once gold is added, the liquid should become a transparent deep red.

Joshua
03-04-2010, 01:35 AM
Aleilius, I'm not considering selling it. Don't worry. Oh, and from what I read, it seems like there are more than two paths... two paths are all that I have done (one is non-traditional). The other processes make sense now and I would like to test them soon. I probably will not be discussing it openly much longer. I do, however, really want to find a patron for my research; that really is my desire for a number of reasons and will be a win-win. And right now is the time that it makes the most sense.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 01:39 AM
Aleilius, I'm not considering selling it. Don't worry. Oh, and from what I read, it seems like there are more than two paths... two paths are all that I have done (one is non-traditional). The other processes make sense now and I would like to test them soon. I probably will not be discussing it openly much longer. I do, however, really want to find a patron for my research; that really is my desire for a number of reasons and will be a win-win. And right now is the time that it makes the most sense.

Do you have any gold around? I would really love to see a picture of your philosophical mercury with gold. I've seen a few of them before, and it's pretty cool to say the least. I really need to get in the lab, and start working. I waste too much time on the theoretical aspects of this work.

Hey, BTW, we lost contact with you in the group. What ever happened? You can send a PM if you want.

Do you still keep in touch with Dizardos/Arca?

P.S. Can we agree that the philosophical mercury can only be produced via metals/minerals? I think it is a waste of time to look for the philosophical mercury in the vegetable/animal kingdoms. It's not dew, and it's not urine.

Joshua
03-04-2010, 01:46 AM
Sticking my finger in it brings to mind a text by Kelly. He said it was caustic... I have always had trouble correlating Kelly's work with the rest of the corpus. What is your opinion of Kelly's work?

Joshua
03-04-2010, 01:54 AM
I will be trying with gold asap. As you can imagine it is high on my list of priorities. Yes, get back in your lab. :-) It is joyful. I didn't have the time for the forum for a while... sorry I took a hiatus. I have not been in contact with much of anyone excepting my wife.

Yes. We can agree. However, there sure are some neat high-energy organic chemicals that chew through gold in a desirable fashion.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 01:55 AM
Sticking my finger in it brings to mind a text by Kelly. He said it was caustic... I have always had trouble with Kelly's work.

Ah, I've heard the exact opposite, that it's not caustic. :cool:

I also know exactly what you're talking about regarding Jupiter. I'm not sure it would be wise to mention anything else. It is a volatile clear liquid, and I most definitely would not stick my finger in it! :D

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 02:48 AM
I will be trying with gold asap. As you can imagine it is high on my list of priorities. Yes, get back in your lab. :-) It is joyful. I didn't have the time for the forum for a while... sorry I took a hiatus. I have not been in contact with much of anyone excepting my wife.

Yes. We can agree. However, there sure are some neat high-energy organic chemicals that chew through gold in a desirable fashion.

I can think of a few instances where organic chemicals would be able to dissolve gold. I'm thinking of organohalides, and also compounds with oxygen (peroxides, ozonides, etc). I'd be more willing to work with organohalides than any highly reactive oxygen species. With the highly reactive oxygen reagents you'll probably end up with something explosive. :D

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 02:58 AM
Certain allotropes of ozone can be made to condense into a liquid form, but those liquids usually take on a blue appearance and would not be clear. I've done extensive research with ozones. O3, and O6, as well as with ortho, and para hydrogens and oxygens from cracking water at resonance.

I'm more interested in allotropes of phosphorus and other elements in the nitrogen family: In addition to nitrogen and phosphorus, bismuth and antimony as well as element 115.

Certain allotropes of phosphorus dissolve gold and are organic in nature (from urine), as well as cyanates- products of heating potassium carbonates with urea from urine, which should not be able to dissolve gold as the cyanides are formed in their oxidised states(OCN), but nonetheless do dissolve gold upon heating.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 03:14 AM
Certain allotropes of ozone can be made to condense into a liquid form, but those liquids usually take on a blue appearance and would not be clear. I've done extensive research with ozones. O3, and O6, as well as with ortho, and para hydrogens and oxygens from cracking water at resonance.

I'm more interested in allotropes of phosphorus and other elements in the nitrogen family: In addition to nitrogen and phosphorus, bismuth and antimony as well as element 115.

Certain allotropes of phosphorus dissolve gold and are organic in nature (from urine), as well as cyanates- products of heating potassium carbonates with urea from urine, which should not be able to dissolve gold as the cyanides are formed in their oxidised states(OCN), but nonetheless do dissolve gold upon heating.
Hi L.R.

If you can show me an alkahest from urine, or dew, that dissolves gold I will eat my words regarding not being able to make anything useful from either one. The cyanide/cyanate angle is not something I've considered. That's some good insight you have there. I've also not sure about the allotropes of phosphorous either, but this has not been something I've studied in great detail. I know red phosphorous makes a very good reducing agent, and can produce very fine colloidal gold.

About element 115: are you the one that mailed that "anonymous" letter to the Ormus mailing group? :cool:

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 03:22 AM
I may be own my here in stating this but I believe these mercurie's ability to dissolve gold are less of a function of chemicals and reactions thereof and have more to do with the geometric patterns their atoms bond in to form their allotopic molecules. For instance the P4 allotrope.

I am far from alone on the matter, Fulcaneli as I had read before and re-affirmed recently while reading a warning he gave on atomic weapons and nuclear proliferation, stated that certain element's atoms could be re-arranged into a certain geometric pattern that would make for far more explosive, destructive compounds than fissile or fusile radioactives(uranium/plutonium). As substances are perfected their geometry is altered to refect or vice- versa, past a certain point of perfection the subject can no longer physically stand in this plane, and collapses a hole into the next. Such high energy reactions/dangers are present in the work of the dry paths and are warned against extensively, as being very quick but deadly paths to the stone.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 03:27 AM
I may be own my here in stating this but I believe these mercurie's ability to dissolve gold are less of a function of chemicals and reactions thereof and have more to do with the geometric patterns their atoms bond in to form their allotopic molecules. For instance the P4 allotrope.

I am far from alone on the matter, Fulcaneli as I had read before and re-affirmed recently while reading a warning he gave on atomic weapons and nuclear proliferation, stated that certain element's atoms could be re-arranged into a certain geometric pattern that would make for far more explosive, destructive compounds than fissile or fusile radioactives(uranium/plutonium). As substances are perfected their geometry is altered to refect or vice- versa, past a certain point of perfection the subject can no longer physically stand in this plane, and collapses a hole into the next. Such high energy reactions/dangers are present in the work of the dry paths and are warned against extensively, as being very quick but deadly paths to the stone.
I have an article about those particular statements on my website. You are right, but I'm not sure if he was talking about the atomic/micro geometric arrangements (as in allotropes), or if he referring to macro non-atomic arrangements. It does make much more sense that he would be referring to allotropes!

You're on your own in this area of research. I have never considered this side of the story before. I guess that's what I get for focusing on specifics, and not the whole picture. :o

Sir, have got my full attention on this subject!

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 03:32 AM
Hi L.R.

If you can show me an alkahest from urine, or dew, that dissolves gold I will eat my words regarding not being able to make anything useful from either one. The cyanide/cyanate angle is not something I've considered. That's some good insight you have there. I've also not sure about the allotropes of phosphorous either, but this has not been something I've studied in great detail. I know red phosphorous makes a very good reducing agent, and can produce very fine colloidal gold.

About element 115: are you the one that mailed that "anonymous" letter to the Ormus mailing group? :cool:

Well, Al I hope you are hungry, lol. I've done it and it does work, I've outlined the process more or less on Solomon's Contemplations on Nitrogen thread. My research and lab work have lead me to believe it is most closely associated to the Cabala Mineralis manuscript, I state as much in that thread as well as offer much compelling supporting data. (In the one post where I decribe the cyanates and the work the one researcher did, where the heated solutions would dissolve gold and the chilled ones would not.)

As for being the anonymous sender of a letter, nay that wasn't me, interested to read it though.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 03:46 AM
Well, Al I hope you are hungry, lol. I've done it and it does work, I've outlined the process more or less on Solomon's Contemplations on Nitrogen thread. My research and lab work have lead me to believe it is most closely associated to the Cabala Mineralis manuscript, I state as much in that thread as well as offer much compelling supporting data. (In the one post where I decribe the cyanates and the work the one researcher did, where the heated solutions would dissolve gold and the chilled ones would not.)

As for being the anonymous sender of a letter, nay that wasn't me, interested to read it though.

I will take a look at it. Seems to be a long thread. I've done some contemplations on nitrogen myself, but I went off on a totally different tangent than you it seems. I'll PM you a link to my own contemplations.

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 03:57 AM
I have an article about those particular statements on my website. You are right, but I'm not sure if he was talking about the atomic/micro geometric arrangements (as in allotropes), or if he referring to macro non-atomic arrangements. It does make much more sense that he would be referring to allotropes!

You're on your own in this area of research. I have never considered this side of the story before. I guess that's what I get for focusing on specifics, and not the whole picture. :o

Sir, have got my full attention on this subject!


Ok well take... say carbon for instance, it has a few allotropes as well.... you have the elemental powder which would be black, right. A grey waxy substance, graphite would be another and diamond probably the most popular of the three, see how a simple change in geometry, the angle in which the carbon atoms bond can result in such profound change in apparent composition, i.e hardness, color, light refraction.

Carbon is organic right, well now take phosphorus it is the backbone of dna and rna, starting with the white, as it is heated it behaves much like carbon except it is reactive to light as well, and a photo-chemical process occurs that causes its simple bonds to become more and more complex, as this happens it goes from white to red, and when sublimated with a metal, becomes a violet phosphorus allotrope and eventually crystallizes just like a diamond into a lapis(resembling a ruby)

My main point here is that the geometry and the length of the molecule is what decides the characteristics, i.e. color, hardness, etc, etc.

As far as chemical compounds go, their reactivity will be a measure of their residual electromagnetic charge, i.e. how much and where in the compound the charge is available for bonding and the elements affinity for other elements which is a function of electron configuration among other things.

So we have two things: chemical reactivity and geometric reactivity, the former will only produce other compounds, not elements, the later however is far more powerful and can and most certainly does create new elements. Animals and plants have this ability within their dna, especially certain micro-organisms for example that can eat sulfur and shit out gold. And others that fix nitrogen into more complex forms of it, namely phosphorus.

As for the P4 allotrope it exhibits a similar forbbiden spin flip charcteristic that puts it into a similar class as Hudson's ormes in relation to certain quantum phenomenon.

Aleilius
03-04-2010, 04:02 AM
Ok well take... say carbon for instance, it has a few allotropes as well.... you have the elemental powder which would be black, right. A grey waxy substance, graphite would be another and diamond probably the most popular of the three, see how a simple change in geometry, the angle in which the carbon atoms bond can result in such profound change in apparent composition, i.e hardness, color, light refraction.

Carbon is organic right, well now take phosphorus it is the backbone of dna and rna, starting with the white, as it is heated it behaves much like carbon except it is reactive to light as well, and a photo-chemical process occurs that causes its simple bonds to become more and more complex, as this happens it goes from white to red, and when sublimated with a metal, becomes a violet phosphorus allotrope and eventually crystallizes just like a diamond into a lapis(resembling a ruby)

My main point here is that the geometry and the length of the molecule is what decides the characteristics, i.e. color, hardness, etc, etc.

As far as chemical compounds go, their reactivity will be a measure of their residual electromagnetic charge, i.e. how much and where in the compound the charge is available and the elements affinity for other elements which is a function of electron configuration among other things.

So we have two things: chemical reactivity and geometric reactivity, the former will only produce other compounds, not elements, the later however is far more powerful and can and most certainly does create new elements. Animals and plants have this ability within their dna, especially certain micro-organisms for example that can eat sulfur and shit out gold. And others that fix nitrogen into more complex forms of it, namely phosphorus.
I have some understanding of allotropes, but I never considered that different allotropes of certain elements would be useful in dissolving gold. I must say, it is very interesting. What you mention about geometric reactivity is also very interesting. I read about those micro-organisms/bacteria a while back. I thought that was pretty cool.

How much time have you spent on these topics?

You now have my attention from this point forward. You've definitely proved yourself to have extensive knowledge on these subjects, and much more than myself in a number of instances. I can learn a lot from you it seems.

LeoRetilus
03-04-2010, 05:35 AM
I have some understanding of allotropes, but I never considered that different allotropes of certain elements would be useful in dissolving gold. I must say, it is very interesting. What you mention about geometric reactivity is also very interesting. I read about those micro-organisms/bacteria a while back. I thought that was pretty cool.

How much time have you spent on these topics?

You now have my attention from this point forward. You've definitely proved yourself to have extensive knowledge on these subjects, and much more than myself in a number of instances. I can learn a lot from you it seems.

About ten years with gold and its various complexes, white powder gold as well and much like Hudson's initial problems with it was occluding my returns, I was very curious about him and his research but mostly in the beginning I was only exploring that avenue in an effort to rid myself of the white powder and increase my yields.
Although his lectures that I have on dvd introduced me to alchemy for the first time, but I never did and still do not consider him and his research alchemy per se. But later stumbled upon the subtleenergies website where I read about Josh's work for the first time as well as Kevin's from Australia, his mercury from air traps and ether collection methods.

I've been working with the allotropes of phosphorus for a couple of years but from inorganic sources and I thought it was a dead end until I realized I was missing something. The life force, the universal spirit, at this point I left conventional physics and chemistry as avenues to explain certain phenomenon and started exploring the work of Wilheilm Reich and Baron Von Reichenbach, and entered bion energy, positive and negative orgone and Odic force. This is where my work shifted from chemical reactions and mundane phenomenon to invisible astral forces, and now I am no doubt as many of you considered a crackpot and a quack, by the peer-reviewing physical journal publishing types.
Recently within the last 6 months I have been revisiting the allotropes of phosphorus, but this time from organic living sources, plant mosses and urine and have had a good measure of Success, no doubt due to the presence of the U spirit. I find the purple sulfur of gold to be most easily taken up by urinous phosphate alkahests, and have been able to whiten this stone and redden it, although my first batch I made back in November was quite impure, I was not able to multiply it to any appreciable degree.

To Josh, I'd like to say again thanks for joining us here dear chap, and if you are comfortable with it would you at least share with us a little about your pyramid process and this document (http://www.subtleenergies.com/ormus/tw/pyramidgold.htm) and whether or not this was one method you used to make your philosophical mercury, if not what direction if any did this research take you?. The subject of attaining the most universal and unspecified form of this spirit is what I am after at this point.

Joshua
03-04-2010, 10:12 AM
Aleilius, no, I wasn't trying to indicate that the p. mercury is caustic. I don't think that what I have is caustic and it is not a compound. I have specifically had problems with the correlation of Kelly's texts with the rest of the corpus, and have tended to give them secondary or tertiary importance. However, certain statements of his give me cause for reevaluation. That was what I was trying to communicate.

Apart from the mercury, I don't know the reactions with the compounds you mention... halides seem interesting as agents for volatilization and reduction of bonding potential. The strong oxidizers seem useful if they can be balanced. It seems that the things that are most useful as p. solvents have the smallest temperature range between the solid-liquid-gas phase transitions. Some organic alcahests may be found that fit this bill from traditional texts.

LR: I have been interested in induced allotropy. There is definitely a transference of structural energy signatures that occurs in certain circumstances between metallic species. The nitrogen family is particularly interesting in this regard. I would love to be able to explore phosphorus in this regard.

"I believe these mercurie's ability to dissolve gold are less of a function of chemicals and reactions thereof and have more to do with the geometric patterns their atoms bond in to form their allotropic molecules." - I have come to this conclusion as well. It appears that as elemental reactivity decreases this effect increases. Watch out for those tetrahedrons :-)

Aleilius, I am really interested in hearing your thoughts on the nitrogen family... could I have that link as well?

LR, the process that I am using to make the p. mercury is not related to my pyramid experimentation. Directly producing mercurial gold in that manner, while possible, does not appear to be particularly efficient, but can be a valuable lesson. With the volatility of the mercurials, it seems that they are a significant atmospheric (and aquatic) aspect, from either interior generation or as cosmic dust, etc. More paths... It all seems to tie together doesn't it?

jnjone4
12-21-2010, 11:24 AM
Could this be one of the Alkahests?...http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/recycling-noble-metals/

Aleilius
12-21-2010, 04:17 PM
Could this be one of the Alkahests?...http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/recycling-noble-metals/

Doubtful, they're talking about dissolving gold. This is not what the alkahest does. The alkahest should extract the sulphur of the metal leaving the dead body behind. It should not dissolve the body.


Source: Fulcanelli - Dwellings

But what distinguishes the philosophical solution from all other ones, and provides it, to say the least, with a true originality, is that the solvent does not assimilate itself to the basic metal which is presented to it; it only separates its molecules, by breaking their cohesion, takes hold of the fragments of pure sulfur which they can retain and leave the residue, formed by the greater part of the inert, disaggregated, sterile and completely irreducible body. We could not then obtain a metallic salt from it, as it is done with the help of chemical aids.