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View Full Version : Volpierre's Method



Aleilius
01-03-2009, 08:33 PM
This is a Phoenix-thread (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?t=7) from the old site (http://alchemy-forums.forumotion.com/forum.htm).

First, let me say this is most likely hosted on one of ***'s old websites. There's the credit, but honestly I don't even think credit is due in this situation. I just want to avoid all the naysayers and such that might try and distract us from this text.

Text Link: http://www.geocities.com/central_powers/Volpierre.pdf

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The text mentions a way to make the stone with these ingredients: 6 parts iron fillings, 1 part stibnite (antimony trisulfide), hydrochloric acid (philosophical), and sulfuric acid (philosophical). Supposedly the acids must be obtained from natural origins. For H2SO4 we need to use copper sulfate (vitriol), and for HCl I assume we can use dead sea salt. Anyway, the stibnite + iron fillings is placed into a large 5L flask and then is fed with HCl and H2SO4 (the feedings vary, as does the amount). The text mentions this is heated at 370-380C, but I think the text is wrong, and it should actually say 37-38C. Over time a wide array of color changes and effects will take place, resulting in the Red Lion.

Meh, that's a quick recap of the entire thing, but if you want to know what happens after the Red Lion is obtained you'll have to read the text.

We can also try a variation on this process with gold. I believe we will need elemental gold calx (not oxide/hydroxide, very finely powered gold will suffice), sulfur (from native crystals), and iron fillings/powder. The acids needed are sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, and nitric acid (obtained from natural sources). This should work like the original method described in the text, but I'm not sure since we're only using gold and not gold sulfide. However, I do believe the sulfur is important, and thus I did include it when thinking about this experiement. I guess if we wanted to replicate the experiment we will need to create gold sulfide. This can be done by bubbling hydrogen sulfide gas into a gold (I) solution to obtain gold (I) sulfide. The original text calls for the trisulfide of antimony, but the trisulfide of gold is unstable in the presence of water, but I believe gold (I) sulfide should suffice.

Here's a way to make gold (III) sulfide (gold trisulfide):


Gold(III) sulfide, cannot be formed by a direct combination of the elements. It is obtained by saturating a dilute solution of either chloroauric acid, H(AuCl4), or gold chloride,AuCl3, or by, treating a dry alkali salt like Li(AuCl4), with H2S. Au+3 is produced as a black powder and will decompose at temperatures above 200 into the elemental constituents.
I have a copy of this work - Frater's Golden Manuscripts.

The first three pourings of acid consist of 3ml HCl and 2ml H2SO4
Beginning with the fourth pouring, 6ml HCl and 4.5ml H2SO4 repeated every fourth day.
My book say 37-38C, not 370 or 380. I wonder what text he is reading.
Wow - it says 370-380 in the text you provided. Hmm.
Someone's trying to throw it off or something.

My book say 37-38C, not 370 or 380. I wonder what text he is reading.
Wow - it says 370-380 in the text you provided. Hmm.
Someone's trying to throw it off or something.
Heh, thanks for the confirmation. I figured those numbers were way off - seems like somebody just tacked a zero on the end.
I wonder if we can just toss some gold calx/power into the antimony/iron starting materials. Antimony should cause the dissolution of gold and remove the need of nitric acid.

6 parts iron powder/fillings
1 part stibnite
1 part gold calx

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A small scale example:

6 grams iron fillings/power
1 gram gold calx
1 gram stibnite

This is such a small amount, and we may be able to get away with using a 1L or 2L flask (instead of a large 5L flask). I wonder about the amount of acids to add. This may change since we're using a very small amount of start materials. Actually, I don't think the text ever mentioned the weight of iron/stibnite to add, just the 6:1 part ratio. Do you know how many grams of iron/stibnite the original method calls for?


Heh, thanks for the confirmation. I figured those numbers were way off - seems like somebody just tacked a zero on the end.The degree sign is a little circle, maybe somebody misread it as a zero?
Very good point! That could be highly plausible.