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Frater F:.L:.
10-07-2010, 06:29 PM
Has anyone ever successfully completed the experiment for Jean Dubuis Acorn Elixir? (http://www.triad-publishing.com/stone18b.html) I have attempted this experiment and it seems to me that instead of months, he means days. Is this common to substitute months for days in spagyrics?

I have documented my results with detailed photos and descriptions of each day here:
Jean Dubuis Acorn Experiment Journal (https://docs.google.com/document/edit?id=17MaTZvUoW5Yx7QAyLF0li3ao0tGu-yybDwjhev8YQ_E&hl=en&authkey=CLWJreYP)

He states that between 6-18 months it will turn a bright red. In my photos you will see that it turns a nice red between 6-18 days. After that it turns black, he doesn't say anything about it turning black. I think the experiment has died, but I don't want to give up on it.

What are your thoughts?

Aleilius
10-07-2010, 06:34 PM
Very nice! I think Seth-Ra has duplicated this experiment.

solomon levi
10-07-2010, 09:06 PM
Has anyone ever successfully completed the experiment for Jean Dubuis Acorn Elixir? (http://www.triad-publishing.com/stone18b.html) I have attempted this experiment and it seems to me that instead of months, he means days. Is this common to substitute months for days in spagyrics?

I have documented my results with detailed photos and descriptions of each day here:
Jean Dubuis Acorn Experiment Journal (https://docs.google.com/document/edit?id=17MaTZvUoW5Yx7QAyLF0li3ao0tGu-yybDwjhev8YQ_E&hl=en&authkey=CLWJreYP)

He states that between 6-18 months it will turn a bright red. In my photos you will see that it turns a nice red between 6-18 days. After that it turns black, he doesn't say anything about it turning black. I think the experiment has died, but I don't want to give up on it.

What are your thoughts?

Yes, I have seen this in some texts - that a philosophical month is but a day. I don't know if this is always intended, but sometimes, yes.

Frater F:.L:.
10-18-2010, 05:32 PM
I've been doing some research and Oak-Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum) is common with White-Oak (Quercus Alba) trees. The acorns I had previously used came from a Nutall-Oak (Quercus Texana).

Now I'm not sure if it matters, but I am going to attempt the experiment again with White-Oak acorns that have actually fallen to the ground and are no longer green.

(All the while keeping the original experiment going).

Frater F:.L:.
10-19-2010, 03:14 AM
Also, it has come to my attention that not all acorns are still living.

To test the acorns, you should fill a bucket with water and dump in your acorns. The ones that float are dead, and naturally, the acorns that sink are viable.