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Aleilius
02-17-2011, 12:20 AM
This is a work I attempted about a year ago. I used pure copper powder. This was added to a solution of HCl + H2O2. This was boiled, and copper chloride resulted. This normal copper chloride was then used in the next steps.

First three pictures show boil-down.
http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_1.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_2.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_3.jpg



Water was added to the previous concentrated solution, and then boiled down once more.
http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_4.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_5.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_6.jpg



An excess of NaCl was added after the previous boil-down.
http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_7.jpg



The previous concentrated green solution with salt was then diluted with water, and boiled down once more.
http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_8.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_9.jpg



I stopped taking pictures at this point. After the first boil-down with NaCl the solution was added to a larger flask with more water. I then proceeded to boil it down again, but unfortunately it super-boiled, the contents erupted from the flask, and all my work was lost.

I've noticed superboiling becomes more and more pronounced with these materials. I've had it happen a number of times, and I've found it to be out of the ordinary.

Aleilius
02-17-2011, 12:28 AM
Take note of the color change in the last image of the second boil-down with sodium chloride. Notice how it's much different than the color of the first boil-down without salt. There's much more color here!

Reference these two images:

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_2.jpg

http://www.vitriolum.net/images/aleilius/copperormes/cuormes_9.jpg

theFool
02-17-2011, 02:36 PM
Copper chloride changes color depending on the concentration of the solution. When completely dry, it may be brown colored. When it absorbs a bit moisture becomes green. With more water, blue ciel as your pictures indicate here. About the last to pictures and the diferrence in coloration, what can I say, maybe the excess of chloride ions (due to the existence of sodium chloride) make the copper ions to behave like they are in a concentrated solution and so produce green color.

About the superboiling problems, yes it is common especially in high concentrated solutions. I use 2-3 pieces of broken glass inside th flask (I dont have boiling stone) they work well.

Aleilius
02-19-2011, 08:52 AM
Copper chloride changes color depending on the concentration of the solution. When completely dry, it may be brown colored. When it absorbs a bit moisture becomes green. With more water, blue ciel as your pictures indicate here. About the last to pictures and the diferrence in coloration, what can I say, maybe the excess of chloride ions (due to the existence of sodium chloride) make the copper ions to behave like they are in a concentrated solution and so produce green color.
Yeah, that's probably most likely the case. I'm trying to follow a variation of the process listed by Hudson in his ORMEs patent. It seems easy on paper, but in practice it's a bit more difficult.

crystalbody
04-20-2011, 12:54 AM
What is this used for ? I believe the m-state of copper is green right? Why couldn't you eat it. I heard chlorophyl is m state copper, thats how plants split h2o into h and o, and uses the hydrogen to rise to the sun. Any comments.