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Donna Matrix
08-23-2011, 03:02 AM
Equipment is my weakness when it comes to the Art. Fortunately its my boyfriend's passion. Ideally is there two levels of equipment for calcination? how high do temps go for calcining herbs? Metals? How long?

If anyone can let me know,I would be so grateful. My boyfriend seems to think that the little burnout ovens we have been looking to purchase can't hold up for a weeks worht of calcination at high temps.

So far, I have been using my BBQ with all three burners on to over 700 F for several hours but have been unable to get much lighter that a dark to medium grey in my salt.

MarkostheGnostic
11-28-2011, 03:45 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Didgital-Automatic-Furnace-Melting-3-Kilo-Silver-Gold-Pour-Bar-110V-Jewelry-/310358841641?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4842d41929

thrival
02-02-2013, 08:18 AM
Hi Donna;

I'm replying to your older post for the benefit of other members in future, knowing full-well you've probably solved your problem by now. Www.alloyavenue.com is another forum where melt-heads hang out; there you can learn to build back-yard foundries, furnaces, burners, crucibles, etc. Your barbecue needs to be lined with some kind of refractory to hold the heat in. One simple furnace idea is to line a 5 gal. stock-pot or discarded metal bucket with sand, fireclay and perlite mix. Make a hole in the bottom which serves as a vent when you invert it over your crucible, set on firebricks. Gas is good, waste vegetable or motor oil burns even hotter (and it's free.) If you build a low hearth you can set a pan of oil inside, fed by a drip tube from outside. Crucible sits on rebar grate, air injected from a vaccum cleaner motor with ceiling fan speed controller.

thrival
02-17-2013, 01:15 AM
Here's the graphic.

http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/203/dripfurnacehearth.png (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/96/dripfurnacehearth.png/)

Karl
03-05-2013, 12:25 PM
Thrival's furnace is a sound one- I built one similar inside a propane cannister. I use it for smelting ore and foundry work. That isn't where I started though. For the most part I still just use a burner on top of a propane cylinder to calcine herbs:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h19/karlcrosby/burning/balsamfir4_zps2da4e7f2.jpg

Depending on the quantity of herb it calcines to white ash in under an hour:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h19/karlcrosby/burning/balsamfir5_zpscad0464a.jpg

If I have a couple of pounds of herb to process I put in all in an oven roaster and build a fire around it- not a meek, gentle fire. I mean pile up the wood directly on the vessel and burn it like a hilbilly:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h19/karlcrosby/burning/pitfire1_zpsa5583e53.jpg

Here I'm using an oxyacetylene torch to calcine marble into lime. Adding a little water to lime creates quicklime or calcium hydroxide which when combined in solution with salt of tartar becomes potassium hydroxide. I didn't expect the shift from marble to calcium oxide to be so dramatic- it becomes powdery white in a couple of minutes.

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h19/karlcrosby/burning/marbleprocessing1_zps4759652b.jpg

As I really like to understand the history of processes I decided to try smelting copper with a coal furnace. I made a set of bag bellows out of some sturdy shopping bags, a Y tuyere out of some pipe and piled bricks up in the backyard. It went fine but using the bag bellows for any length of time becomes pretty tedious. I didn't document it but it looks a lot like this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ut3pXPyMze4

I moved on to use a hairdryer as a blower:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h19/karlcrosby/burning/setup1_zpse3f3f1ba.jpg

I have plans to try a wind furnace during the summer. If anyone is in Ontario there is a blacksmith who does Viking style iron smelting courses. He starts from scratch and builds a furnace out of cob (silica and 10% high alumina clay) and by the end of the weekend everyone walks away with a piece of the bloom.

horticult
03-05-2013, 04:59 PM
nice
maybe you will be interested in fresnel sol furnace

Karl
03-07-2013, 03:38 AM
Hi Horticult- have you worked with a solar furnace? For the past couple of years I've been on the fence about buying a fresnel lens like this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=JkgFk15uBxw

This one in France is pretty inspiring- the whole building focuses the sun on a container the size of a soup pot:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ac/Four_solaire_001.jpg/800px-Four_solaire_001.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_furnace

Draconisnova
03-12-2013, 08:37 PM
There are many types of calcination, and there is the philosophical calcination that don't involve any type of high heat at all. But if you want cremate your poor herbs and minerals i will suggest you give a look into kilns
and foundry furnaces. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VA9MLQJM3u0

But high heat don't mean good results in alchemy, the objective is to preserve the life not destroy it.

Karl
03-12-2013, 10:18 PM
There are many types of calcination, and there is the philosophical calcination that don't involve any type of high heat at all. But if you want cremate your poor herbs and minerals i will suggest you give a look into kilns
and foundry furnaces. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VA9MLQJM3u0

But high heat don't mean good results in alchemy, the objective is to preserve the life not destroy it.

I suppose I might be being a little insensitive to the vibrations in the salt. I'm a metal working by trade so going over board with heat is a difficult habit to dial back. How do you approach separating the mineral element from a plant Draconisnova?

Draconisnova
03-13-2013, 12:00 PM
I suggest you ferment your fresh plants for a period of 1 to two months, with a low heat temperature, about 95F, distill the water by parts, (heaven or fire, air, water and earth) it means separate the volatile from the fixed parts by distillation, circulate each one for a period of about 1 month, and the most heavy part you will extract two parts, the body and the soul of the plant, the body is the heavy parts or the earth, and the soul is the oil that heavier then the rest of the elements (quintessence), then you should calcine the earth, but only after fermentation (putrefaction), separation circulation and purification. And try low heat calcinations, high heat dont mean a good calcination.

Karl
03-13-2013, 12:38 PM
...ferment your fresh plants for a period of 1 to two months, with a low heat temperature, about 95F, distill the water by parts, (heaven or fire, air, water and earth) it means separate the volatile from the fixed parts by distillation, circulate each one for a period of about 1 month, and the most heavy part you will extract two parts, the body and the soul of the plant, the body is the heavy parts or the earth, and the soul is the oil that heavier then the rest of the elements (quintessence), then you should calcine the earth, but only after fermentation (putrefaction), separation circulation and purification. And try low heat calcinations, high heat dont mean a good calcination.

Thank you for answering Draconisnova. I've done analogous processes but not quite like that. Fractioning the fermentation water is an interesting step. I'm curious- do you add a yeast to start fermentation? Are you able to get enough alcohol in your final product to avoid bacterial spoilage? How particularly do you approach your low heat calcination? Athanor for a week?

thrival
03-31-2013, 07:52 AM
Yes, Draconisnova, I'm interested in your fermenting method too. Also, my understanding was that the essential oil was the lightest fraction of distillate.



...ferment your fresh plants for a period of 1 to two months, with a low heat temperature, about 95F, distill the water by parts, (heaven or fire, air, water and earth) it means separate the volatile from the fixed parts by distillation, circulate each one for a period of about 1 month, and the most heavy part you will extract two parts, the body and the soul of the plant, the body is the heavy parts or the earth, and the soul is the oil that heavier then the rest of the elements (quintessence), then you should calcine the earth, but only after fermentation (putrefaction), separation circulation and purification. And try low heat calcinations, high heat dont mean a good calcination.



Thank you for answering Draconisnova. I've done analogous processes but not quite like that. Fractioning the fermentation water is an interesting step. I'm curious- do you add a yeast to start fermentation? Are you able to get enough alcohol in your final product to avoid bacterial spoilage? How particularly do you approach your low heat calcination? Athanor for a week?