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MarkostheGnostic
09-06-2011, 01:02 PM
These seem to be more decorative than practical. I could be wrong, but their fragile-looking forms do not speak to even distribution of heat or shock. Nevertheless, they are artistically beautiful:

http://www.incandescentsculpture.com/alchemy.php

These are a very nice combination of ancient concept and modern form. I haven't priced any, but one should be prepared for high prices for custom production, not to mention shipping cost from Iceland!:

http://www.elixirherbal.com/lab_and_glassware_page/lab_and_glassware.html

http://www.crscientific.com/glassretort.html

Brennus
11-20-2011, 07:28 PM
These seem to be more decorative than practical. I could be wrong, but their fragile-looking forms do not speak to even distribution of heat or shock. Nevertheless, they are artistically beautiful:

http://www.incandescentsculpture.com/alchemy.php

These are a very nice combination of ancient concept and modern form. I haven't priced any, but one should be prepared for high prices for custom production, not to mention shipping cost from Iceland!:

http://www.elixirherbal.com/lab_and_glassware_page/lab_and_glassware.html

http://www.crscientific.com/glassretort.html

Very interesting sites but I wouldn't want to risk paying for something that has to be imported into the UK!

MarkostheGnostic
11-20-2011, 07:58 PM
Hmmm. I was going to ask if you checked the sites that I found some time ago, but upon clicking on them, they had morphed into something quite useless it seemed. :confused:
Sometimes, universities have auctions in the states, for books and equipment. Similarly, companies also get rid of old or excess equipment through auctions. The equipment for a small spagyrics lab is not excessive. A fractionating column, a thermometer, a Liebig or Graham condenser, receiving flask, separatory funnel may be essential, but even a Soxhlet extractor can be built from parts. http://www.alchymie.ca/Bin/The%20Home%20Made%20Laboratory.pdf

Albion
11-20-2011, 09:19 PM
http://www.kleinbottle.com/images/7-Klein-BottlesA.jpg

http://www.kleinbottle.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klein_bottle

:)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/Science_Museum_London_1110529_nevit.jpg/450px-Science_Museum_London_1110529_nevit.jpg

MarkostheGnostic
11-20-2011, 10:17 PM
Cool! My 6th grade teacher, Mr. Bornstein, introduced the class to Topology during the 1964-65 school year. Klein bottles and Möebus strips were included. He also introduced Base Numbers. Not being very good with a Base 10 number system, all those lessons did was further increase my math phobia :(

Susu
12-11-2011, 02:48 PM
A fractionating column, a thermometer, a Liebig or Graham condenser, receiving flask, separatory funnel may be essential, but even a Soxhlet extractor can be built from parts. http://www.alchymie.ca/Bin/The%20Home%20Made%20Laboratory.pdf

I was curious about the deliquescencing of tartar salt. I thought that it had to be glass pyrex that was used for the potassium carbonate because of how it can etch into the glass. Wouldn't plastic have a chemical effect along with etching quicker?

MarkostheGnostic
12-11-2011, 06:47 PM
I was curious about the deliquescencing of tartar salt. I thought that it had to be glass pyrex that was used for the potassium carbonate because of how it can etch into the glass. Wouldn't plastic have a chemical effect along with etching quicker?

I believe that Potassium Carbonate will leave a permanent milky residue to Pyrex®, Kimex®, or any borosilicate glass. That is why ceramic or porcelain is recommended. Hydrofluoric acid, which has long been used to etch deeply into crystal ('cut-glass') used to be held in gutta-percha containers. There are probably all kinds of non-reactive plastics, but alchemy enthusiasts often try to remain with era materials. Even borosilicate glass is suspicious to some people, because the nature (shape, porosity, etc.) of the vessel is said to be a variable in alchemical (vs. chemical) transformations.