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View Full Version : Corpus Hermeticum - Variations & Mutations Across Languages, Time and Geography



Krisztian
07-05-2012, 07:25 AM
Fascinating. Thank you. I really should start studying these manuscripts. Are you familiar with Johann Ambrosius Seibmacher's The Waterstone of the Wise (http://www.levity.com/alchemy/hydrolit.html)? I came across it after I had already begun practising alchemy.

I'm not familiar with it. I'll look into it. Thanks very much.

Anything that hits a chored with us, we must follow. Our soul must be our guide!

For me, I concentrate strictly on alchemy from the 16th Century. Anything older, I believe, and it's just my humble opinion, doesn't seem right. It seems confused. After research upon research, reading, reading, and reading some more, I came to realize that 16th Century was the true era for alchemy. I'm sure people will disagree with me. But I'm certain now.

That doesn't mean in other Centuries you don't have quality works, but it's like finding a needle within a haystack. Please don't take my word for it, it's just my opinion.

Bel Matina
07-05-2012, 01:13 PM
There was definitely a change in tone in European alchemy after it spread from the clergy. Very little change in content, I find, until the seventeenth century, when there was a radiation in practices, after the tradition got much broader on account of the whole Rosicrucian thing. I suppose the manifestos are more symptomatic than causal, there is that quote (which I can't find now) about making some road "nice and soft" with all the books publishing the secrets of the art in the wake of the printing press.

Have you read Geber? I've only read fragments myself, I'm trying to find a copy in the original Arabic. It doesn't seem to me the art has changed substantially since his time. It might be worth looking into.

Krisztian
07-05-2012, 05:33 PM
I suppose the manifestos are more symptomatic than causal, there is that quote (which I can't find now) about making some road "nice and soft" with all the books publishing the secrets of the art in the wake of the printing press.

That argument you make is completely reasonable to assert.

True Initiate
07-05-2012, 07:13 PM
Have you read Geber? I've only read fragments myself, I'm trying to find a copy in the original Arabic. It doesn't seem to me the art has changed substantially since his time. It might be worth looking into.

Yes, the Alchemy came from Arabians to the medieval Europeans with all the cover names and manipulations. About the Geber which treatise are you searching for?

Bel Matina
07-05-2012, 07:20 PM
About the Geber which treatise are you searching for?

The more I can get in as few translations from the original as possible, the happier I am. I actually just got my hands on some of the Corpus Hermeticum in Latin and Greek.