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Aleilius
01-06-2009, 04:43 AM
I'm wondering if our members could point out some uses of carbon/lampblack/soot in alchemy.

I've got another crazy idea I'm cooking up. It involves lampblack/soot and one other substance. I really don't want to say much, because it's a pretty novel idea. However, I'd like to see if the alchemists were on to this.

Lampblack/soot is known to contain fullerenes. Fullerenes are spherical conglomerations of carbon rings (five and six sided rings). They are quite interesting, and can become quite useful if used properly.

A nonpolar organic solvent is used to extract a "tincture" from soot. This tincture is an impure solution of fullerenes (various sizes).

kerkring
01-06-2009, 02:46 PM
I'm wondering if our members could point out some uses of carbon/lampblack/soot in alchemy.

From 'Real Alchemy':

"There is some evidence to suggest that the priests at the Temple of Amun in ancient Egypt produced it by sublimating soot. The product contained volatile ammonia salts and was called The Salt of Amun, then later Sal Ammoniac(NH4Cl)."

Aleilius
01-10-2009, 11:04 AM
"There is some evidence to suggest that the priests at the Temple of Amun in ancient Egypt produced it by sublimating soot. The product contained volatile ammonia salts and was called The Salt of Amun, then later Sal Ammoniac(NH4Cl)."
I found a source for this procedure. It's noted in "The Encyclopedia of Chemistry, Practical and Theoretical Embracing Its Application to the Arts, Metallurgy, Mineralogy, Geology, Medicine, and Pharmacy By James Curtis Booth, Campbell Morfit."

http://books.google.com/books?id=wZcAAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA146&ots=z_VmIJrLxl&dq=ammonium%20salts%20from%20soot&pg=PA146&ci=534,409,430,557&source=bookclip

This is the complete process:
http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/3936/egyptsalammoniackt0.jpg

However, I must ask where the chloride is coming from? I don't see a source for it. The text just mentions camel dung and urine. To do this you need to add sea salt to the dung/urine.

Weidenfeld
01-10-2009, 01:53 PM
However, I must ask where the chloride is coming from? I don't see a source for it. The text just mentions camel dung and urine. To do this you need to add sea salt to the dung/urine.

The chloride is already contained as sodium / potassium cloride in the urine.

Aleilius
01-10-2009, 06:30 PM
That's possibly a good explaination for it.

solomon levi
01-12-2009, 06:59 PM
Just wanted to add that when considering carbon, sugar is also
a source. Heat it in an oven at 450F (I think Fahrenheit) and it
turns into mostly carbon, burning off the hydrogen and oxygen.

I'll have to get back to you with uses/recipes.

solomon levi
01-14-2009, 06:30 PM
Another note of interest on carbon -
When the philosophers describe the prima materia
as being coagulated through the elemenets, from sky
to earth and back again, from fire to earth and returns,
it's very easy to see dew/precipitation as a substance that
follows these processes.
But it should be noted that carbon cycle
also follows the same circuitous journey.

solomon levi
01-22-2009, 04:51 AM
I'm wondering if our members could point out some uses of carbon/lampblack/soot in alchemy.



"Nitre, fixed by charcoal, and resolved into a liquor, is the only alkali employed in preparing the Kermes."
-

solomon levi
02-28-2009, 10:04 PM
I'm wondering if our members could point out some uses of carbon/lampblack/soot in alchemy.



Here's another from Glauber:

"A SPECIES OF SOPHIC STONE FROM CARBON
If any mercurial salt be added to charcoal in a due weight, and be closed
with it in a crucible but one day, and kept in the fire, the coal will be
changed into a red, fiery, and heavy stone, more metallic than vegetable,
and possessing admirable virtues which the tongue cannot declare."

Another, similar:
"A RED CARBUNCLE PREPARED FROM CHARCOAL AND
SAL MIRABILE"
Melt two or three ounces of sal mirabile in a pot or crucible, and throw in
a piece of wood-coal or charcoal. Put on the cover, and let the mixture flow
for half an hour, or an entire hour, so that the salt may dissolve as much of
the coal as it can, and may leave the rest of it undissolved. Then pour out the
matter, and there appears a red stone of salt, which has a hot taste, as most
alkaline salts are found to have.
This red carbuncle, being dissolved in water, yields a green solution, which,
being filtered and let stand for some hours, appears of a white color, and, on
further standing, acquires a yellowish color. One drop therof gilds over an
imperial even as sulphur does, if it be therin put.
If any acid be poured into the white solution of the coals, and that little by
little, until the alkaline salt be neutralised, a sediment will precipitate in the
form of a white powder, which, seperated from the salt and washed and dried,
burns away, and answers exactly to the mineral sulphur."

Another mode of demonstration:
First of all, exactly melt the coals by the sal mirabile in a melting pot, so that
the salt be accurately alkalizated by the coals and taste sharp. Now treat the
powdered mass with anhydrous alcohol and put the glass to digest in hot sand.
Well shake the vessel now and then, so that the spirit of wine may extract the
sulphur, and leave the salt untouched. The alcohol becomes as red as blood.
Exhaust the matter with fresh spirit. Now distill the extract, and there results
a sweet oil of a blood-red color, an excellent medicine of sweet odor and taste,
and little inferior to that named potable gold. This oil has its use in alchemy
as well as medicine."