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Ezalor
09-10-2012, 05:03 PM
My basic equipment is getting together.

Today I acquired 5 glass and porcelain vessels from a garage sale, originally used in a restaurant as small vases or to hold oils or sauces, all I have to do is find fitting stoppers and they will be perfect for tincturing. The porcelain one (has glaze inside as well) will be perfect for highly light-sensitive substances. I paid around $4 for the whole. They also have LOT of porcelain jars, glazed inside as well, which I will probably take next week when I have some money. They are kinda similar to the old medicine jars used in apothecaries, so I plan to use them to store raw ingredients.

Also a friend just found for me a box of old glass Florence-flasks, two with completely round bottom (which are to be used for heating and distilling, according to another friend who is a chemistry engineer) and the rest with a bit flat area so they can stand on the table. (I don't know most the proper English terms so I try to describe them rather.).
And at some point (most likely only next month tho) I will have access to an old storage room with all kinds of stuff in it, and I can take any lab-ware they say are not specifically needed, but I have no idea what and how many will that be. The only thing I'm sure about is that they have some vials and flasks, and I recall I saw a glass water cooled spiral condenser last time I was there, but I'm really not sure. There might also be an etanol burner.

I also have a small camping gas burner that looks like will be perfect for calcination or heating.


All I'm still missing before I can start the first spagyric Dubuis experiment is a mortar and pestle, and some heat resistant vessel for calcination. I know I can get a simple clay mortar for pretty cheap in some home-and-decor shops, I already visited one and they said they used to have it, but out of stock now and no idea when will it restock. So probably I will spend a day in the city visiting home and decor shops. The calcinator is still an issue, but I will find something out. I guess metal would have the risk of chemically reacting with the ashes when hot.

Goldlion973
09-10-2012, 08:59 PM
Bunsen burner might just do the trick, use a small metal pan or thick walled bowl with the mass inside and keep going, leech, and keep going.

Ezalor
09-10-2012, 09:03 PM
The moderators confuse me with moving around my posts all the time! LOL...

Actually I thought I will post personal things and news into my intro topic, so it's all in one place. I didn't mean to start a new thread just for this. :/

Goldlion973
09-10-2012, 09:14 PM
Yeah... typed a long response in the oils distillation thread I made last night, forum timed out on me asking me to login again, password failed and I lost the post.

Takes a while to adjust to a forum .lol.

Andro
09-10-2012, 09:46 PM
The moderators confuse me with moving around my posts all the time!

Well, you made an Equipment post in an Introduction thread, so... The Introductions are basically just meant to get an idea of who our new members are (and to welcome them to the forum :))

Besides, you posted good equipment-related stuff, well deserving its place in the Equipment section...

We must also think of the other readers who are looking for specific info, and posting in the most appropriate section(s) can make orientation much easier.

It may take a little time to get used to it :)

THIS (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?385-What-is-where&p=23697#post23697) may help.

Awani
09-10-2012, 10:30 PM
Yeah... typed a long response in the oils distillation thread I made last night, forum timed out on me asking me to login again, password failed and I lost the post.

Always good to write in Word and save if you are creating BIG posts, just in case. Personally I have ticked the little box when you sign in so I never sign out, this works if you are using your own computer.


Actually I thought I will post personal things and news into my intro topic, so it's all in one place. I didn't mean to start a new thread just for this. :/

You shouldn't really do that, it is better to create a new thread for each topic you might have if you want others to read them, if you post it all in your intro thread it will be impossible for others to navigate. Just a suggestion. If unsure where to post a thread just put it in General Discussions and the Moderators can always move it later.

:cool:

Goldlion973
09-11-2012, 09:12 AM
Thanks Dev.

Made the 'mistake' of buying a gas kiln when I was shopping around for bits and pieces, spent £200 on a flamefast gas one that didn't work, will cost £800 to have the manufacturer fix it and reburb to a new like state. While mulling over those beans I recalled finding a jewelry muffle furnace on ebay... did not want to use one as I live at home with family, the sudden spike in the energy bill would have been a bit rude, hence the gas kiln but looking at options the Jewelry Muffle Kilns hardly cost much to run, glorified toasters really. That and (the more expensive ones) will work out when/if you intend to move on to higher works with metals and so on whereas small (affordable) kilns will tend to be more problematic unless you go all out and buy a large one.


http://i00.i.aliimg.com/wsphoto/v1/584164226_1/2012-Hot-sale-Italian-Digital-Melting-font-b-Furnace-b-font-Melting-Machine-jewelry-font-b.jpg_250x250.jpg

Can also use a fireplace with granite crucibles, they're not too pricey.... was doing this before, worked well for some calcinations but found that some needed a REALLY long burn as in a whole day plus a few hours extra, was really odd, had a hyssop experiment going and it just wouldn't calcine, left it in the fireplace all night and nothing happened, tried again and it was the same, just didn't budge. Perhaps because I left it under rather than in the midst of it but everything else was red hot, considered that I might have packed the herb in too tightly probably the problem no oxygen under the fire (coal fire btw) and nothing inside the matter for it to breath and really work up a sweat, anyway... as said, a bunsen burner would do well if things are difficult, if I hadn't rediscovered the jewelry kiln its how I'd have to work, bar saving £800 to get my kiln fixed.

Peace
GLIII

Ezalor
09-15-2012, 05:06 PM
HOLY SH*T!!!

I wish I had cash... I just found, on an online auction site (for my country) a set of chemical laboratory equipment for sale. 84 pieces (!!!) Of glassware, including some special pieces. And the whole thing is offered for about $280 from which I could maybe haggle a bit, but then travel and/or shipment costs added I may end up with $280-300 as final. Taken into account that usually single pieces of glassware are sold between $10-30 worth of money, or even more, it is a pretty good deal.

Just a few pics:
http://n2.vatera.hu/photos/52/63/7b16_3_big.jpg
http://n2.vatera.hu/photos/52/63/7b16_4_big.jpg

The only problem is that unless something pops up, no way I can get enough right now. But we will see... if nobody buys it, I will be able to contact the seller in the near future and ask if he still has them. I think he also sells them piece by piece, which of course must be worth it much less than buying the whole, but I may still be able to get a few useful pieces.


And now that I'm past the shock... let's answer the replies, haha.


Offtopic:

We must also think of the other readers who are looking for specific info
Well, right about that. I was just thinking, maybe it would be interesting if there was a "member journal" section where if someone wanted, could open a thread and use it as a work diary, post updates on his personal work so it is all in one place, can be followed through which is useful both for learning from others' work (and mistakes) and also if he asks for help, the others can look into the diary the get the background. But seeing no such, I thought I just post some things in the intro. My point for journal is the clear timeline.


Always good to write in Word and save if you are creating BIG posts, just in case. Personally I have ticked the little box when you sign in so I never sign out
I use the "stay sign in" as well, but what I do to make sure posts don't get lost is that before I hit the "Post" button, I select the whole text and copy it to clipboard from where I can paste it back if something goes wrong. This is pretty easy with shortucts. On Windows Ctrl+A (Select all); Ctrl+C (Copy - Windows sometimes fails to copy so press this 3 times, to make it sure) and if needed, Ctrl+V to paste. So in fact I just hold down Ctrl and hit A C C C.


Back on topic:
I have now a camping gas stove like this:
662
It should work well for calcination. However, I see a possible problem:

Our house is small, no any extra rooms so my permanent laboratory will be for now a table in my bedroom. I guess it's clear I wouldn't want to doo more dangerous things there - I don't want to light my carpet on fire, nor spill some chemicals on it. So all I can do is go out to the kitchen, which is a bit better. However... calcination in the first phases should create lot of smoke. Even though we have that thing above the stove that is supposed to ventilate fumes out, we didn't use it in years and I'm not sure if it even works. On top of that, I live with someone who has eye problems (inflammation and else), smoke can be irritating and thus cause serious problems, thus it must be avoided or at least kept to a total minimum. Burning incense is not a problem, but anything more than that may be.

So it seems my only option is to go outside, but then there I will have to find out something to protect against wind, as it may just blow away the delicate ashes. And then, the autumn is approaching so there will be more raining, it gets cold and so on.

Questions:
- Any ideas or experiences regarding how to deal with the smoke? In the first place, HOW MUCH smoke I should expect? If it isn't much, maybe I can jut try doing it in the room, open the windows and close the door so the other parts of the house don't get smoked... or maybe the ventilator thing above the stove can deal with it, but then, I will have to check it first, make sure it works, and test how much it can take.
- Can I simply calcinate in multiple phases? I mean, if I do it in stages, like smoky first stage outside then less-smoky stage inside, without having to worry that any undesired chemical reaction may undergo in the ashes during the breaks and cooling then reheating?
- What materials can you suggest to use as a calcinator vessel? Someone on the Internet suggested a metal plate but I'm afraid the red-hot metal would go into chemical reaction with the ashes. I have glazed and unglazed clay but I'm not sure if it can stand such heat (as far as I know clay vessels used for cooking are all without glaze), plus, unglazed clay is porous, and if I want to use it to evaporate the water at the salt crystallization phase it will absorb some of the solution which would not only mean loss, but may also contaminate the next substances if cleaning fails to completely remove the remains.


As far as I looked around the Internet, there are quite some people who take equipment much less seriously, but I, if I do something, want to do it right.

Krisztian
09-15-2012, 06:21 PM
I just found, on an online auction site (for my country) a set of chemical laboratory equipment for sale. 84 pieces (!!!) Of glassware, including some special pieces.

I know the feeling. Things seem to pop up at the right time, no?

Be careful with used laboratory equipment, especially concerning glassware! We don't know what the person used it for. There's residue. . . . Also, the modern version of glassware is slightly different than the old. Subtle energetic differences do count! Just take a look at the modern interpretation of retorts compared to the old?! (Maybe someone here can post some photos of the difference?)

In your neck of the woods, you may be able to find an old master of glassmaking. That's the person you may want to befriend. Bring him a bottle of Egri Bikavér, if you know what I mean?

Ezalor
09-15-2012, 07:11 PM
Bring him a bottle of Egri Bikavér, if you know what I mean?
Haha, you got that right. I will look around. :)

Ezalor
09-19-2012, 07:15 PM
Today I did some grocery shopping form my grandmother in the local supermarket. And I thought... if I'm here already, maybe I should look around the kitchen department, maybe I find something useful. So I did. And when I was about to draw the conclusion that nothing really useful is here... I spotted this:
663

The exact same model, smoke marble mortar and for only $5.5 worth of money! A mortar was one if the vital things I still missed for starting the basic work. It is small, only 9cm outside diameter, 7cm inside, and 5cm tall, but should be pretty enough for crushing smaller amounts of dry herbs.

I also realized all I need for salt crystallization is a simple flat-bottom beaker glass, I should be able to get one for cheap. Now the only issue remaining is the vessel for calcination. Anyone can have a feedback on my previous questions about that?

Andro
09-19-2012, 11:43 PM
Now the only issue remaining is the vessel for calcination. Anyone can have a feedback on my previous questions about that?

Depends on what you wish to calcine. For plant ashes, a regular kitchen pan will do the trick very well.


I guess metal would have the risk of chemically reacting with the ashes when hot.

You would filter out the impurities anyway. Besides, this ash/salt doesn't really 'open' during such calcination and I doubt it really has any ingress into metal at the temperatures we are dealing with in this case.

http://www.alchemywebsite.com/images/skalec01.jpg

http://www.alchemywebsite.com/images/skalec03.jpg

SOURCE (http://www.alchemywebsite.com/steve_kalec.html)

Ezalor
09-23-2012, 04:41 PM
Thanks for the feedback! Now that I think about it... what about Teflon? That should be totally neutral and not reacting with anything.

In the meanwhile though, I found a wehbshop for cheap chemistry lab equipment, and ordered a few very basic things, including a porcelain vessel used for heating. I have no idea what is the proper English term for it, translating the Hungarian into English comes out as "heating jar". Maybe "crucible" is the proper term? It is pretty small tho, 6 cm in diameter so not for working with great amounts.

But with this order, now I will have everything of the basic things for making basic spagyric elixirs. The next thing I will try to acquire is a very basic distillation setup.