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Ezalor
12-02-2012, 01:15 AM
So, I have a bunch of used glassware, some genuine labware, others originally household items which however may still be employed. The problem is, after they were washed carefully, there are still some "stuff" on the inside of some. I have no idea what those "dirt patches" might be, but conventional cleaning didn't took them off.

So I'm looking for some simple and safe method to power-clean them. What do you suggest? Sulphuric acid probably?

Draconisnova
01-05-2013, 03:04 AM
I use sand to wash my flasks, just place a bit of sand on the bottom, some water and detergent, close the flask, and spin the sand inside the flask vigorously for some time, it help a lot remove burned organic matters.

Goldlion973
06-24-2013, 01:21 PM
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Carboy-Demijohn-Bottle-Cleaner-Clean-Bottle-Drill-Cleaning-Brush-Beer-Wine-/230992415194http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Carboy-Demijohn-Bottle-Cleaner-Clean-Bottle-Drill-Cleaning-Brush-Beer-Wine-/230992415194

Couldn't do with out it....

thoth
06-24-2013, 08:45 PM
I find bleach great. I first use it undiluted swirl it around the nasty bits. Later add some water, and just let it steep overnight. Then I put in dishwasher to get rid of remains of bleach as it would destroy any biological experiments

JDP
06-24-2013, 09:25 PM
So, I have a bunch of used glassware, some genuine labware, others originally household items which however may still be employed. The problem is, after they were washed carefully, there are still some "stuff" on the inside of some. I have no idea what those "dirt patches" might be, but conventional cleaning didn't took them off.

So I'm looking for some simple and safe method to power-clean them. What do you suggest? Sulphuric acid probably?

It depends on what the stuff stuck to your glassware is. If it is organic, usually solvents like alcohol, acetone or a petroleum hydrocarbon (toluene, benzene, xylene, etc.) will get rid of it. Some inorganic materials may be removed with nitric, hydrochloric or sulfuric acid, or aqua regia. Others will go off with strong alkalies (a lye solution, for example.) Sometimes heating these reagents is necessary to remove these bothersome residues.

DonSweet
01-19-2014, 05:52 PM
I'll support what Draconisnova said ...

Use sand, detergent and water. You can keep a small bucket handy with water and a bit of sand in the bottom. You can even clean complex items like Graham condensers and Soxhlets by shaking them (sealed) at various angles, then working out or flushing the sand. I did this as a kid 40 years ago.