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Andro
01-12-2014, 01:30 PM
Just talked with a friend who is doing his own nutrition research.

He found some interesting possible connections between naturally occurring opiates in various foods, and the highly addictive potential they hold.

One of the articles ends with an interesting hypothesis:


"For the same reason that human breast milk contains morphine, the casomorphins in cow's milk are intended to sedate/placate/anesthetize calves born into the wild. Is it any surprise that humans (whose poignantly aware brains contain as many neurons as stars in our galaxy!) are the only mammals who never stop weaning themselves from this narcotic elixir? Perhaps we dope and dumb ourselves down with these opiate peptides in order not to go insane from the poignant awareness that such a huge brain generates."

Here are some links to look into it and see for yourselves:

Do Hidden Opiates In Our Food Explain Food Addictions? (Page 1) (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1)

Do Hidden Opiates In Our Food Explain Food Addictions? (Page 2) (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1?page=2)

Sugar Is A Drug (http://robbwolf.com/2012/12/21/sugar-drug/)

III
01-13-2014, 01:24 AM
Just talked with a friend who is doing his own nutrition research.

He found some interesting possible connections between naturally occurring opiates in various foods, and the highly addictive potential they hold.

One of the articles ends with an interesting hypothesis:



Here are some links to look into it and see for yourselves:

Do Hidden Opiates In Our Food Explain Food Addictions? (Page 1) (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1)
[/URL]
(http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1?page=2)[U]Do Hidden Opiates In Our Food Explain Food Addictions? (Page 2) (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1?page=2)

Sugar Is A Drug (http://robbwolf.com/2012/12/21/sugar-drug/)

Hi Androgynus,


I'm surprised to see this rehash of old old old "news" here. I have been aware of these hypotheses for approximately 50 years and then that was going back to information published in the 40s and 50s. In the past 50 years I have been to hell and back on many nutritional issues and have taken opioids medically for 24 years now, morphine sulfate for the past 14 years. I have also studied both on paper and by learning how, via Tantra practice, to generate endorphins and dopamine, but only if the necessary biological precursors are present (the tantric meal of course).

A book called SWEET AND DEADLY was published back in about 1976 or so. Let's consider sugar. In the sugar as opioid there is a different hypothesis that fits a lot better. Sugar is intimately tied in to insulin. Insulin causes a drop in blood sugar. A rapid drop in blood sugar causes basically some of the same sensations as reasonably intense opioid withdrawal symptoms giving the person a frantic feeling. Why isn't it opioid like. For starters the conditioned response to sugar or even the anticipation of sugar, can occur within about 3 days of starting the conditioning. It takes in excess of two weeks to become accommodated sufficiently to an opioid that it might cause some withdrawal symptoms. While it helps to break up the conditioned response in opioid withdrawal plans, that is a drop in the bucket and it takes weeks to taper to a full withdrawal. The conditioned response can be broken up in 3 days for opioid or sugar. With sugar, at that point it is over. With opioid the real work of withdrawal really begins.

Sugar is most attractive to those with nutritional deficiencies that hinder their production of ATP in the brain via the Krebs cycle oxidizing fats, which is necessary for the production of dopamine and oxytocin which has a breakdown path that includes endorphins, endogenous opioids. This breakdown occurs in the brain where these are generated. Dopamine doesn't just arbitrarily pop into existence. It gets MADE.

Lack of the biochemical requirements mean it doesn't get made. So, in some of the people with these deficiencies, specifically in the limbic system circuit which has so much to do with mood and personality, when both methylation and Krebs cycle (ATP) get turned on, the suddenly generated neurotransmitters, including dopamine, cause increased anxiety, fear, panic, anger, rage, homicidal rage and severe depression. This is a percentage of people. Some feel a more euphoric response which is more what would be expected. Some feel both and some feel nothing at all. The two strong feeling pathways both have demyelination damage to different parts of the brain. The people with the anxiety pathways actively seek out foods and drugs that turn off methylation or especially ATP which is directly in the dopamine pathway. The mood, anxiety, fear, panic, anger etc. map to rising and falling serum level of carnitine. With a very small dose the whole cycle may take 4-12 hours. With a slightly larger dose it can take 36 hours. The sugar cycle from start to peak to trough can be over in 2 or 3 hours because of the insulin. Sugar provides an alternate quicker pathway to energy generation than fat. Insulin also causes the potassium to fall dramatically as it goes into tissue. Falling potassium can also trigger severe emotional changes is the same people that have the deficiencies and so have no buffering to the effects of sugar. This is easily demonstrated.

the highly addictive potential they hold.

And that is truly ludicrous. Because of a method of naming these things there is much confusion generated. The real test of that "highly addictive potential " is whether these food items can stop morphine withdrawal in a human who is accommodated. I am accommodated to 180mg a day. How much wheat or milk or sugar or any other of these foods would I need to consume to stop withdrawal? No possible amount to the best of my knowledge. If anybody can offer a plausible method of consuming these items I would be willing to run trials. A single 15-30mg tablet will stop withdrawal in 45 minutes and last hours in my case.

Now let's look at addicts. Have you ever heard of anybody trying to mainline milk or wheat? Why do addicts "shoot" heroin or snort it and why is it preferred to morphine? Morphine is not lipid soluble as heroin is making it uniquely effective in the brain. If heroin is injected or absorbed mucosally it bypasses 'first pass metabolism" by the liver which turns it into ordinary morphine. There are dozens of molecules that include "morphine", most of which are not known to be active in humans. The mouse tail flick test is flawed as well in some technical ways. I studied up on that some years back for a project I was working on. For a simple and limited explanation;
Limitations[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tail_flick_test&action=edit&section=4)]

The tail flick test is one of many tests used to measure sensitivity to heat-induced pain in live animals. The reflex response to heat-induced pain is, for the most part, a good indicator of the pain sensitivity of an organism and of the reduction of pain sensitivity by analgesics. However, this type of test has some important limitations. First, much more research is needed in the field of pain research using murine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murine) subjects; therefore, the validity of translating the observed pain responses from these animals to humans cannot be certain.[12] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_flick_test#cite_note-12) Also, researchers have found that skin temperature can significantly affect the results of the tail flick test and it is important to consider this effect when performing the test.[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_flick_test#cite_note-13) Lastly, many thermal tests do not distinguish between opioid agonists and mixed agonist-antagonists, and consequently a tail flick test for mice using cold water in place of heat has been developed to allow that distinction.[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_flick_test#cite_note-14)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_flick_test


Even the breakdown product morphine glucuronide-3 is not active and causes convulsions if too much accumulates. When heroin goes through the liver it becomes morphine, possibly the least popular opioid of all time for abuse for all sorts of reasons. Morphine and it's breakdown products cause anorexia for several reasons. It does not in the least stimulate appetite.

Knowing addicts all too well for a long time and having lots of experience with morphine and other opioids, in myself and others, if there was a human active morphine in milk, wheat and other foods, addicts would find a way to access it and then convert it to heroin which is vastly preferred by the addict. Morphine will prevent heroin withdrawal but doesn't give the 'high". Morphine taken at a steady rate has no "high", no "reward" in any steady quantity beyond analgesia. I thought this whole business had died a well deserved death 30 years ago.

bleeding yolk
08-26-2014, 08:54 PM
....the biochemistry of daily life is very complicated.......however a few key notes should be looked into.......the general scarcity of maoi containing foods in the modern diet and its correlation with depression , the opiate like affects of modern wheat (gluten) , ........and the addictive properties of excess salt , sugar , and caffeine in combination......