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Leon Corlew
02-18-2014, 04:34 AM
As I have begun my study of the art I've noticed a few things. The most important of which (from the stance of one trying to study as much as possible) is that I can't read from a computer screen for hours on end as I can with a physical book. While a do have an eReader (a Nook) I thought it would be fun to physically print and bind some of the pdfs from the RAMS collection. Anyone else have any experience in this?

Will update with pictures as this small project progresses.

Salazius
02-24-2014, 03:43 PM
I did print several RAMS books in order to read them and to take notes directly on the paper ... and it takes an enormous space.

Ghislain
02-24-2014, 06:51 PM
I did print several RAMS books in order to read them and to take notes directly on the paper ... and it takes an enormous space.

Not to mention the trees...but I have to agree with Leon Corlew there is nothing as good as a physical book in your hands...I wonder why?

I have a tablet too and although I read from it quite a bit, something is missing.

Ghislain

Illen A. Cluf
02-24-2014, 10:16 PM
I also am unable to read books online, and have a Kindle which I almost never use. I have printed out some of the RAMS books in the past (double-sided) but they do take up a lot of space. I use those plastic combs to bind the books as well, which takes up even more space, and sometimes causes the books to bind. Having paper print-outs also allows you to do highlighting and make notes.

Michaelis Vallachus
10-10-2016, 04:10 PM
This is the very thing that brought me to binding books, my current proffesion. It s one of the most noble crafts I could think of, and the satisfactions abound. If I can help with any advices or tips on how to bind your own books, I will certainly do my best. I m all for sharing knowledge freely if time permits me.

zoas23
10-10-2016, 11:32 PM
This is the very thing that brought me to binding books, my current proffesion. It s one of the most noble crafts I could think of, and the satisfactions abound. If I can help with any advices or tips on how to bind your own books, I will certainly do my best. I m all for sharing knowledge freely if time permits me.

I would like an advice which is slightly off topic: What do you recommend to PRESERVE old books and keep them in good conditions?

(i.e, how to properly clean different types of covers, if there's something that is good to do to the old yellowish pages, etc).

Any tips are welcome!!!

Michaelis Vallachus
10-11-2016, 12:18 PM
Zoas, your question is very complex, like me asking Hey any tips on how to do Alchemy? :D
Every type of paper, leather, cloth, gilding and other material has it s own regimen, it s own history and it s own enemies.
These are rather general:
-keep them away from light
-keep them away from smoke
-keep them in a constant temperature as much as possible
-keep them away from untouched places where vermin might nest.
-dust them
-keep them away from himidity
-put mold infested books aside and do not mingle them with healthy books.
-read em!
-keep them away from assholes who treat them improperly

Aaand you re set for a few centuries more :D

zoas23
10-11-2016, 07:11 PM
Zoas, your question is very complex, like me asking Hey any tips on how to do Alchemy? :D
Every type of paper, leather, cloth, gilding and other material has it s own regimen, it s own history and it s own enemies.
These are rather general:
-keep them away from light
-keep them away from smoke
-keep them in a constant temperature as much as possible
-keep them away from untouched places where vermin might nest.
-dust them
-keep them away from himidity
-put mold infested books aside and do not mingle them with healthy books.
-read em!
-keep them away from assholes who treat them improperly

Aaand you re set for a few centuries more :D

Thank you!

I already did some tricks, but I don't know if they are profanities.... a lot of my softcover books are covered with a transparent sticker whose name in my country is "contact", but it's not an international brand (I assume): it's simply a huge transparent sticker that you cut to the size of the book, in most cases used by the parents of the little kids to protect the books they use at school.

Whilst my hardcover books...

The ones which have a non-absorbent surface: I cleaned them with a protective silicone that is used to clean and protect cars... !

the ones which have an absorbent surface: I cleaned them with transparent shoe polishing cream.

(They all look as if they were new, but I don't know if it was a good idea in the long term).

Michaelis Vallachus
10-11-2016, 07:16 PM
when we say old books, we generally think older than 150 years. On modern books, other methods apply. On contemporary books, others.
Anything made from woodpulp paper is doomed to become fail and cruple away in a few years, and nothing can be done about that, other than digitisation.

Kiorionis
10-12-2016, 02:10 AM
Hey all,



Anything made from woodpulp paper is doomed to become fail and cruple away in a few years

Curious. What type of paper would you recommend for the best preservation of a book?

zoas23
10-12-2016, 03:23 AM
Hey all,



Curuous. What type of paper would you recommend for the best preservation of a book?

Exactly the same thing I was going to ask... a lot of books are promoted nowadays as being made with "acid free paper", suggesting that it's better... and I looked in wikipedia and found this information, which is useful: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid-free_paper

But since we have an expert in the room... I'd love to hear an explanation of the different types of paper (just the main ones) and their advantages and disadvantages (I assume there's hundreds of types of papers, so I am only asking about the most typical ones).

Michaelis Vallachus
10-12-2016, 06:38 AM
The best paper for books you read and use IS 80-100g white woodpulp paper. It will las your whole life, but will decay. And lets be serious, most of our children and nephews and nieces will not be interested in alchemy. Those are for your use.

The best paper for a very important work that is meant to last for centuries, bound in vegetable tanned leather, would be rag paper, made from cotton, just like any of the old books that were printed in the old days. That s supposed to be printed upon and sized with gelatin, then pressed, it will most likely look like blotting paper and jamm in your printer or cause someone at Kinko s top lose their job.

The middle path is acid free paper, which will last longer than a few generations of course, just enough for the right people to use and admire your books.
However, it s a bit pricey. I see people who do either alchemy or magic who would like to invest diddly squat, maybe even be paid by someone else to do it.

To love something is to invest in it. I ve held my passion for alchemy at bay until I was successuful enough to afford a good space to work in, not my cubbard, and real quality flasks, not tequila bottles, and it is worth the wait and maturisation.

The same with printing your books. Acid free paper might be moderate-to-pricey when doing your very own alchemical journal, but if you want to print out the entire RAMS archive, it might cost you a kidney or something.

I d recmmend chosing your texts carefully, deciding for whose use you intend them, then invest what you can afford over a longer period of time in them.
I tought myself bookbinding precisely for that, and now my unique, privately printed, hand sewn, leatherbound book collection is growing.

That s kinda gold out of nothing. I would ve needed to be filthy rich to order such a collection.

zoas23
10-12-2016, 07:20 AM
Thanks a lot for your explanation!

Other than that, it's always a pleasure for me to speak to someone who has a very specific passion and a vast knowledge on the area (the material aspect of the books in your case). Quite often it does not matter WHAT this passion is. It can be Chinese Pottery, an enthusiast of an author who even knows which one was his shoe size, an expert in the art of Bonsais, a calligrapher with a vast knowledge on the history of calligraphy (Hahaha... they seem to be random examples, but I'm mentioning the specific areas of interest of some of my closest friends). I love the delicacy of that kind of knowledge, that kind of very specific knowledge.

I will have to tie my fingers or I will keep on asking questions, just for the pleasure of reading your answers.

Michaelis Vallachus
10-12-2016, 10:20 AM
Thanks a lot for your explanation!

Other than that, it's always a pleasure for me to speak to someone who has a very specific passion and a vast knowledge on the area (the material aspect of the books in your case). Quite often it does not matter WHAT this passion is. It can be Chinese Pottery, an enthusiast of an author who even knows which one was his shoe size, an expert in the art of Bonsais, a calligrapher with a vast knowledge on the history of calligraphy (Hahaha... they seem to be random examples, but I'm mentioning the specific areas of interest of some of my closest friends). I love the delicacy of that kind of knowledge, that kind of very specific knowledge.

I will have to tie my fingers or I will keep on asking questions, just for the pleasure of reading your answers.

I know exactly what you mean, I could listen to craftsmen explain their craft for hours and watch yt vids of it, just to absorb the infrmation and see that twinkle in their eyes when they detail their art, because you know they do it out of love. I can t get enough of it.

And thank you for the kind words, I ll make every effort to make my answers interesting and not sound like a huge knowitall.

Schmuldvich
10-12-2016, 08:36 PM
As I have begun my study of the art I've noticed a few things. The most important of which (from the stance of one trying to study as much as possible) is that I can't read from a computer screen for hours on end as I can with a physical book. While a do have an eReader (a Nook) I thought it would be fun to physically print and bind some of the pdfs from the RAMS collection. Anyone else have any experience in this?

FedEx/Kinkos has this paper (https://www.amazon.com/Mohawk-Writing-Natural-Watermarked-143580/dp/B004XG656K) for $15, which I print on with this fantastic $60 laser printer (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16828731010) from Newegg, then 3-hole punch (https://www.amazon.com/Swingline-EasyView-Desktop-Capacity-A7074063/dp/B01H0E6V0Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1476303996&sr=1-5&keywords=3+hole+punch+paper), and finally tie twine (https://www.amazon.com/Lehigh-Group-Twine-Heavy-twine/dp/B000VYBB0I) through to bind the "book".

This works for me well.




http://i.imgur.com/clqyEtw.jpg



http://i.imgur.com/ijJg1v4.jpg