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DonSweet
03-01-2014, 04:02 PM
Although not even consciously aware of Alchemy at the time, when I was fifteen I built and used a full-blown chemlab. Surprisingly, four photographs of the lab have survived 40+ years. As you can see, it was no simply chemistry set. I may key and identify components of the lab at one point (mostly for my own edification) and will share the graphic if and when I do.

The second image is a double exposure. These photographs were taken with a cheap plastic camera I used at the time that took 120 film ... likely 1971 ... and had fixed focus and shutter speed. I had not yet entered the photography universe.

I'm fairly convinced my Life Path first directed me INTO the lab at an early age to rekindle past life involvement with Alchemy, but redirected me OUT of the lab [and away from established, conventional chemistry] to spend several decades on Spiritual Exploration.

I'm trying "Dropbox" for viewing images since I've had a bit of trouble with PhotoBucket.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/nnm66jvoohu0xxn/OriginalLab1.tiff

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hoblb45sr6r0zao/OriginalLab2.tiff

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7f52kqfafgrgrmo/OriginalLab3.tiff

https://www.dropbox.com/s/yg6eqxqakem0ktr/OriginalLab4.tiff

MarkostheGnostic
03-01-2014, 09:11 PM
It would seem that we are kindred souls. I have a few pics of my home lab, but not in its original form in 1963 at age 10, unfortunately. This picture is from 1967 (Livingston, NJ) when I was in the 9th grade. I set up a bunch of equipment just for the pic.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/JuniorHighLab.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/JuniorHighLab.jpg.html)

This book was my constant companion from the 6th grade. I learned of alchemists and philosophers in the opening pages, and performed every experiment at least once. It was my difficulties with numbers and the old fashioned slide rule that prevented me from changing from biology to chemistry as an undergraduate. Of course, it was because of imbibing certain chemicals that my intention to become a physician was replaced by my becoming a philosophy major in college instead.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/51X4VCOOaxL_SX258_BO1204203200_.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/51X4VCOOaxL_SX258_BO1204203200_.jpg.html)

MarkostheGnostic
03-01-2014, 09:15 PM
This pic is from 1970, either later in 11th or early in the 12th grade. My dad had already run gas for bunsen burners, but here is a professional table and out of range was a small sink that I could connect an aspirator for vacuum filtration.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/HighSchoolLab.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/HighSchoolLab.jpg.html)

MarkostheGnostic
03-01-2014, 09:22 PM
Lastly, my Meteorlogic® Helium-Neon LASER Holography setup, that I was never successful in. I had no experience with darkroom procedures, and this had to be conducted in total darns, no safe-light, with tray solutions at specific temperatures. I couldn't even tell the emulsion side of the holographic film. This was the first LASER most people had seen. I ended up using it to terrorize neighbors from over 100 yards away. I'd shine it into windows which would refract the beam all over, and through a telescope I would watch befuddled strangers run outside to see where the phenomenon was originating. :-D At another location, we'd zap people's dashboards in their cars (maybe 1974), and watched a woman slap her dashboard as if to put out a fire! We zapped a couple of engineers who called the cops on us. When they arrived and asked for a "red light," we showed them a red plastic battery lantern. People were unfamiliar with that orange-red dot that the movies have made so common from LASER sights on rifles.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/089F9C12.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/089F9C12.jpg.html)

DonSweet
03-02-2014, 08:17 AM
Great posts Markos ...

Seems we were neighbors, too. Those photos were taken in Millington, NJ, now Long Valley next to Warren and Watchung. I am more than familiar with Livingston.

1971 was freshman year for me, also the first year I looked through the viewfinder of a thru-the-lens reflex camera, fell in love, and never looked back.

My disillusionment with conventional science came a year or so after that when I was required to take biology before chemistry.

Not only didn't that make any sense to me since anything living is made out of chemicals, so you should learn about that first, there was no way I was cutting apart dead bodies to learn about it. That wasn't going to happen ... although I gave it a shot and took the course ... but the moment they put a worm in front of me and said "Take it apart" I resigned. I was always fine with a microscope and wiggly things -- fascinated -- but guts and goo were out of the question.

Interestingly, years later in the 90's a high school girl in California sued the school for forcing her to do the same thing, and she won, being able to take chemistry without the biology prerequisite.

You're far in advance of lab work than I am. I had little knowledge of Alchemy at the time. I claim a connection to it due to my unquestionable spiritual path since that time ... partly through photography. I am an original wet process photographer ... something I consider a form of Alchemy. It is artistic and spiritual expression through chemistry and optics. I suppose it's my contention that any "process" that involves interaction with elements of the physical plane to produce a spiritual outcome is Alchemy.

Having spent a bit of time (eight years) dwelling on the past as a WWII reenactor (combat photographer and correspondent) it's my "impression" that this return to Alchemy proper is to propel me into the future. In that light, I'm paying close attention to the Masters and the Adepts of the past, but doing my best to see Alchemy and its place in present day experience. In other words, I do not intend to "reenact" the Alchemy of the Masters and Adepts, but use what they learned to move forward into a new millennium.

Thanks very much for sharing your own history ... and great stories about the laser!

I look forward to more chats.

-- Don

MarkostheGnostic
03-02-2014, 09:58 AM
Thanks for the response Don. After I began using psychedelics, and opening my heart, pithing a frog was bad enough, but breaking the neck of a mouse was too much. My upper class lab assistant Salim (who was an extraverted Turk whom I later lived next door to), demonstrated how to kill the mouse by pinning its neck and pulling the tail up. He tore the tail off, (I was told) and the poor creature ran around bleeding and squeaking in agony. I never did kill a mouse for that class. My heart began to soften, and when we were issued fetal pigs, I took red string licorice to class and asked Salim which color was which. He said red was the arteries, blue the veins, yellow the lymphatic system. I held up a length of red licorice to show him, and he said (from several feet away), "that would be an artery." I then ate it in front of him! His eyes almost left their sockets! :D By the third semester, I took 6 months off to re-evaluate my academic life, explore more psychedelics, and returned to become a philosophy major. My poor parents. :(

MarkostheGnostic
03-02-2014, 11:07 PM
More recently, a small addition to my study/consulting room:


http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/SaurnianElixir.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/SaurnianElixir.jpg.html)

JDP
03-03-2014, 03:53 PM
This book was my constant companion from the 6th grade. I learned of alchemists and philosophers in the opening pages, and performed every experiment at least once. It was my difficulties with numbers and the old fashioned slide rule that prevented me from changing from biology to chemistry as an undergraduate. Of course, it was because of imbibing certain chemicals that my intention to become a physician was replaced by my becoming a philosophy major in college instead.

http://i1194.photobucket.com/albums/aa379/MarkosthGnostic/51X4VCOOaxL_SX258_BO1204203200_.jpg (http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/MarkosthGnostic/media/51X4VCOOaxL_SX258_BO1204203200_.jpg.html)

A scan of that book can be found here:

http://chemistry.about.com/library/goldenchem.pdf

The author expresses (page 7) the typical opinion of chemists regarding alchemy & transmutation: stating that no one has succeeded in making even a speck of gold by making any substances react with one another. A rather bold assertion based no doubt on theoretical conjectures and assumptions, considering the huge number of substances and their possible combinations/interactions under a number of different conditions, which not even modern chemistry has been able to empirically test all of them.

Andro
03-04-2014, 09:57 AM
The author expresses (page 7) the typical opinion of chemists regarding alchemy & transmutation: stating that no one has succeeded in making even a speck of gold by making any substances react with one another. A rather bold assertion based no doubt on theoretical conjectures and assumptions, considering the huge number of substances and their possible combinations/interactions under a number of different conditions, which not even modern chemistry has been able to empirically test all of them.

Note: Spin-Off discussion continued here: Aspects of Alchemy (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?3946-Aspects-of-Alchemy)