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View Full Version : Strange GREEN salt (a mistake, but why???)



zoas23
09-06-2015, 06:11 PM
Hi,

I calcinated some Melisa to get this "alcohol soluble" salt I was talking about here:
http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?4491-Silly-question-about-the-salt.

and something went completely wrong, but in the previous steps. I used a very small amount of Melissa, since I only wanted it for a picture for that thread.

Let me explain you what I did:

1) Calcination in a stainless stell pot using a bunsen.
Result -> Gray ashes, the usual for me.

2) Calcination in a porcelain crucible using a bunsen.
Result -> Light gray ashes.

3) Calcination in a Lab Capsule (perfectly clean) in the Lab Oven. I used 900 Celsius for 5 hours... the "chimney" of the oven was open (i.e, calcination WITH oxygen)

Result -> The ashes went light green.

Some of the ashes are IMPOSSIBLE to separate from the capsule and they look "wet", even if they are not wet.

I think the "paint layer" that the capsule has may have melted in the oven and developed a green color and created an "amalgam" with some of the ashes, whilst it "painted" the rest of the ashes.

Photos:

The capsule and the ashes that are impossible to remove and look "wet":
http://s22.postimg.org/ify3g7k75/11997150_10207732189970540_266790868_n.jpg

A mortar with the ashes that I've been able to remove:
http://s22.postimg.org/fx7t1s935/11759016_10207732189370525_541644505_n.jpg

No, corrosives, acids, etc were used in the process.
The capsule was clean.
The capsule is a Lab Capsule designed to be used with heat...

What the hell went wrong?
Maybe it's just the poor quality of the paint of the capsule???? (i.e, a "bad product").

JDP
09-07-2015, 12:13 AM
Hi,

I calcinated some Melisa to get this "alcohol soluble" salt I was talking about here:
http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?4491-Silly-question-about-the-salt.

and something went completely wrong, but in the previous steps. I used a very small amount of Melissa, since I only wanted it for a picture for that thread.

Let me explain you what I did:

1) Calcination in a stainless stell pot using a bunsen.
Result -> Gray ashes, the usual for me.

2) Calcination in a porcelain crucible using a bunsen.
Result -> Light gray ashes.

3) Calcination in a Lab Capsule (perfectly clean) in the Lab Oven. I used 900 Celsius for 5 hours... the "chimney" of the oven was open (i.e, calcination WITH oxygen)

Result -> The ashes went light green.

Some of the ashes are IMPOSSIBLE to separate from the capsule and they look "wet", even if they are not wet.

I think the "paint layer" that the capsule has may have melted in the oven and developed a green color and created an "amalgam" with some of the ashes, whilst it "painted" the rest of the ashes.

Photos:

The capsule and the ashes that are impossible to remove and look "wet":
http://s22.postimg.org/ify3g7k75/11997150_10207732189970540_266790868_n.jpg

A mortar with the ashes that I've been able to remove:
http://s22.postimg.org/fx7t1s935/11759016_10207732189370525_541644505_n.jpg

No, corrosives, acids, etc were used in the process.
The capsule was clean.
The capsule is a Lab Capsule designed to be used with heat...

What the hell went wrong?
Maybe it's just the poor quality of the paint of the capsule???? (i.e, a "bad product").

It seems like you heated the ashes too much and the alkali salts melted. Next time try a lower temperature, like 700 or 800C, well below the melting points of both sodium and potassium carbonates.

zoas23
09-07-2015, 05:07 AM
It seems like you heated the ashes too much and the alkali salts melted. Next time try a lower temperature, like 700 or 800C, well below the melting points of both sodium and potassium carbonates.

Thank you, your tips have the value of gold for me.
I am new with the oven (the oven is new).

I will follow your advice next time. I will also keep the ashes in a small flask, as a precious reminder of my mistake.

I will try to clean the capsule with bleach, the worst thing that can happen is that it won't remove the melted salts.

In love with this place!

Salazius
09-07-2015, 09:02 PM
Some salts can fuse with glass and other materials, like iron, inox, and so on, and will take the sulfur of the material in them (dry extraction, the alkali salt acting as dry menstrum). There is only one advice to give : like it was perfectly stated above, less temp !

zoas23
09-08-2015, 03:12 AM
Some salts can fuse with glass and other materials, like iron, inox, and so on, and will take the sulfur of the material in them (dry extraction, the alkali salt acting as dry menstrum). There is only one advice to give : like it was perfectly stated above, less temp !

It is a privilege for me to receive help from persons like you.
Pure beauty.
And now a smile lightens my face.

Axismundi000
09-14-2015, 09:44 AM
I came across this issue. The glaze of the porceline crucible will fuse with the salts, for basic Spagyric elixir not such high temp is needed. To make a plant stone one way is to fuse or glass salts so an unglazed crucible is required.

zoas23
09-14-2015, 04:58 PM
I came across this issue. The glaze of the porceline crucible will fuse with the salts, for basic Spagyric elixir not such high temp is needed. To make a plant stone one way is to fuse or glass salts so an unglazed crucible is required.

Yes, I will create my own crucibles (I am having busy weeks, specially after an unexpected car crash -I'm safe, but my car is at the mechanic)... and I will do what everyone else said: LESS HEAT!!!