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zoas23
12-26-2015, 08:38 AM
I post this here, not so much for you Peter, but rather for anyone else who reads this with the idea of
doing the same experiment, since you obviously already decided not to heed my warning.

Since the lye used was lab grade, (and not food grade or pharmaceutical grade which absolutely should have been used), the products from the lye are in no way suitable for consumption by a human. Furthermore it was lab-grade lye purchased from a chinese manufacturer, which should also set off alarm bells.

That being said, if there are mercury contaminants, the first symptoms will be ringing in the ears, followed by a desire to withdraw socially from contact with other people, if the mercury is continually ingested, eventually death will result from liver or kidney damage, (or both).
I believe that it might take around 2 years for death to eventuate.
So I doubt Peter that you will see you mice die anytime soon. I also doubt whether the mice will tell you of their symptoms of tinninitus, nor the other short term effects to their nervous systems from mercury poisoning, so I expect that you will almost certainly begin taking your self-made precipitate in the not to distant future.

To repeat myself, because I honestly believe this can never be said too many times....

Only use food grade or pharmaceutical grade lye to make products for human consumption.

Many of the early ormus pioneers and experimenters are already dead well before their time, for not following this simple advice.

Ghetto Alchemist posted this issue in another thread.

I am very grateful to have read this post, because it saved me from a mistake that could have been fatal in the future (I had the intention of doing something with lye in the future).

His comments made me think of something:

Which ones are the best methods to detect Mercury (I am speaking about literal Mercury).

Google told me that Selenium was one of the reactives that could be used, but I thought that maybe there's other methods... and that it's such an important topic that it probably deserved a thread for itself (mostly because knowing how to detect mercury can make a difference between life and death).

Kiorionis
12-26-2015, 02:36 PM
There are two methods I know of. The first is testing for heavy metal toxicity with hair folicles, and the second is finding a physician who uses muscle and organ reflexology to determine imbalances.

zoas23
12-26-2015, 09:53 PM
There are two methods I know of. The first is testing for heavy metal toxicity with hair folicles, and the second is finding a physician who uses muscle and organ reflexology to determine imbalances.

Thank you!!!
But you misunderstood the question... even if you gave a right answer.

My question is: How to detect if a substance contains Mercury BEFORE it is consumed?
I.e, Ghetto Alchemist was talking about lye... is there any "universal" reactive that could be used to test if it has Mercury or not?
(with "universal" I mean something that would detect Mercury in lye, but also in other substances)...

But I am not talking about the human body.

Kiorionis
12-26-2015, 10:36 PM
Oh! :)
That makes it a bit more interesting. The only thing I've tested was the purity of metals based on acid testing, but that doesn't necessarily identify which sorts of impurities are present.

zoas23
12-27-2015, 12:10 AM
Oh! :)
That makes it a bit more interesting. The only thing I've tested was the purity of metals based on acid testing, but that doesn't necessarily identify which sorts of impurities are present.

Thank you. I've been reading about Selenium.

I will talk to two friends who are chemists... Their information can save lives, since accidental mercury poisoning isn't desirable for any of us.

ghetto alchemist
12-27-2015, 01:13 AM
Thanks Zoas.
It is a great idea of yours to create a dedicated thread for this topic, makes the information
much less likely to disappear into the ether.

To answer your question, my local health food store has a heavy metals test kit, which will detect mercury (and others) in a sample. It uses a color change to show the presence of any heavy metals. There's only 2 drawbacks, the first one is that you can only use it once, if you want to test a second sample, then you need to buy another test kit. And the second drawback is the price of $45 for the test kit, it is quite expensive. In fact, that same test kit has sat on the shelf for over 5 years, I'll bet it's still there today if I go down and check.

It should be possible to buy these test kits online, although I have no idea where from.

zoas23
12-29-2015, 12:31 AM
This is the reply I got from a friend (his main language isn't English, he's a chemist and we've been talking about alchemy, having nice conversations on the subject... I explained him some basic things in the past, so he knows more or less the kind of things that a person who is interested in alchemy would try to do and which ones are the usual methods... that's why he answers with some basic knowledge and somehow guessing why I am asking).


A nice 2016 to you aswell.

A fast and accurate detection of Hg (mercury) isn't all that simple actually, I can however suggest a few rudimentary steps that can reduce the risk of any Hg persisting from your lye into your alchemy.

I am guessing your lye has traces of Hg due to the fabrication method (it involves a Hg electrode), but I guess you are specific interested in the potash (NaOH, KOH) in the lye itself.

As such you might be able to reduce the amount of Hg by either dissolving the lye in water (Hg doesn't dissolve nor would it oxidize with just water and lye) and continuing from there (split off the bottom water/insolubles in which the Hg would stay) with possible re-crystallisation should you fancy that.

Or try heating the lye, the potash itself won't melt but the Hg will evaporate slowly if you stay under 200C, offcourse the vapours aren't healthy either!

I am not in love with his "water method", but heating the lye sounds like a good way of solving the problem.

I will ask a second chemist too, but he's currently having vacations.

theFool
12-29-2015, 02:02 PM
This page might help you: http://www.marz-kreations.com/Chemistry/Cation-ID/162o-Mercury.html

For example, to use potassium iodide seems to be a nice test. However, absence of a positive result does not mean that the sample you check is clean.

Axismundi000
12-30-2015, 11:43 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong here please.

Putting alcohol on commercial potasium carbonate to increase alcohol concentration to 97-98% does not contaminate the alcohol with mercury.

True or False?

JDP
12-31-2015, 08:59 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong here please.

Putting alcohol on commercial potasium carbonate to increase alcohol concentration to 97-98% does not contaminate the alcohol with mercury.

True or False?

Unless one of the two mentioned substances is already contaminated with some soluble mercury compound, then no.

Axismundi000
12-31-2015, 03:59 PM
I suspected so, I see no reason why Mercury would chemically bond with the alcohol or go into solution in it assuming the pot carb has any appreciable amount of Mercury contaminant in it.

Peter Barnes
03-02-2016, 06:27 PM
I sent off for two of those test kits, one that tests for any heavy metals an another for mercury. I was wondering though if other substances have mercury or heavy metals in them in tiny amounts, in the food we eat, what we drink, it would be great if we could tests everything or maybe there is a website that has done this already.