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Andro
01-14-2016, 11:52 PM
May the mods want to open another thread where we shall speak about interesting solvents found in various works.

As per the request of Hellin Hermetist, this thread is dedicated to transcribe receipts for certain menstruums found in some less known works, like those of Samuel Cottereau Du Clos or the Cappucins of Louvre.

pierre
01-15-2016, 12:46 AM
I shall tanscript a method for the production of a solvent which dissolves gold without violence, heat and smoke from an author I find reliable in the other thread. But this doesnt prove anything about alchemy or metallic transmutation. Maybe you can transcript the receipt for Borello's solvent there as well if it isnt a secret.


No, it's not secret at all. The same Borello published in an edition of 1711. Work with the dew of May to get a residual material substance that traps a sulphurous air that has great affinity with gold and dissolves with softness. It's a pretty classic recipe. It collects dew, strain, evaporates and exposes to the stars. From the crystals obtained, does a spirit to remove the salt and oil of gold.

Andro
01-15-2016, 01:05 AM
No, it's not secret at all. The same Borello published in an edition of 1711. Work with the dew of May to get a residual material substance that traps a sulphurous air that has great affinity with gold and dissolves with softness. It's a pretty classic recipe. It collects dew, strain, evaporates and exposes to the stars. From the crystals obtained, does a spirit to remove the salt and oil of gold.

This reminds me of another work by a French physician ("Jean de Saulx") from 1727. Maybe they're the same person, as the methods sounds very similar...


Experience of a new discovery of magnetism, attracting the universal spirit, the subtlest ethereal red liquid 'niter' from air.

In 1710 at the March equinox, I collected dew and rainwater; I passed these waters on an insipid earth; then I leaked this water several times through a filter, and so prepared it was clear and completely tasteless.

I then left it to evaporate on glass plates in the sun of May. [...]

After some phenomena I reached the end of it; it was a tiny ash powder and tasteless; it weighed no more than a grain of barley. I exposed this fine dust to the air on a piece of concave glass (I put it at my bedroom window exposed to the rising sun, with good weather and during dawn, i.e. half an hour before sunrise. Fifteen minutes later, I found the transparent glass filled with a red liquid that seemed to make the fingers oily.

The liquid's taste was penetrating, without any heat or acrimony; it tasted salty, nice and sweet without acidity or alkalinity; and it was unlike any other species of salt.

I poured the liquid into a pot of strong glass and then I exposed it to the air; and the fine dust, still wet, rather than attract new liquid, dried quickly; the sun having risen, called its son or the spirit back to itself.

Hellin Hermetist
01-15-2016, 01:41 AM
Special Solvent from the Eau du Mere du Salpeter
From Secrets et Remedes Eprouves of Abbe Rousseau (Cappucine de Louvre)
(All the treatise is excellent. Not translated to English except some parts by Bacstorm. The translation here is mine)


"I have done an interesting experiment using eau du mere du salpeter, after I had seperated it from all other salts, and after I had let it dissolve at the air, and had filtered and coaguated it so many times, that it left nothing to the filter. I have performed a similar experiment using the eau du mere of vitriol. There is this a difference between the experiment with salpeter and the one with vitriol, as the dead head of the eau du mere of salpeter, when distilled without any mixture, bowl, brick or clay, remains in mass under a metalline form, white as milk, from which one draws by leaching a very white Salt, fusible as the wax, which resolves to the humidity of the air much faster than does the Salt of tartar. I have therefore resolved, filtered & coagulated so many times this salt, that there remained no more earth on the filter. And then I cohobated its spirit over it, and distilled it using a graduated fire. I dissolved again in the air the remaining salt, coagulated it and I repeated that process so many times, that all my salt had passed with the spirit through the retort.

This spirit animated with its prepared salt, dissloves gold without violence and carries with itself through the alembic in a very moderate fire. And what is most remarkable, although the common spirit of niter dissolves easily and with violence metallic mercury but not metallic gold, this animated spirit doesnt dissolve mercury. But if we put it over mercury, it becomes in an instant black as the ink and swells at the bottom of the vessel, and mercury is reduced to dust without mixing itself with the dissolvant. Also in the non violent dissolution and volatilization of gold, which is performed with the same solvent, a small part of the gold stays back under the form of a white earth, which the solvent can not dissolve any more than mercury. The Philosophers have reflected over those facts, and every of them adopted the reasoning which pleased him most".

zoas23
01-15-2016, 02:18 AM
No, it's not secret at all. The same Borello published in an edition of 1711. Work with the dew of May to get a residual material substance that traps a sulphurous air that has great affinity with gold and dissolves with softness. It's a pretty classic recipe. It collects dew, strain, evaporates and exposes to the stars. From the crystals obtained, does a spirit to remove the salt and oil of gold.

Why May?

I am asking because of the usual references to the dew of May and the rain of May...

I live in the Southern Hemisphere. If you lived here, would "May" be important for you or would you adapt it to, say, first days of November?

pierre
01-15-2016, 02:23 AM
This reminds me of another work by a French physician ("Jean de Saulx") from 1727. Maybe they're the same person, as the methods sounds very similar...



Certainly, there is a common source among these authors. And I suspect that this source is Sendivogius....

pierre
01-15-2016, 02:32 AM
Why May?

I am asking because of the usual references to the dew of May and the rain of May...

I live in the Southern Hemisphere. If you lived here, would "May" be important for you or would you adapt it to, say, first days of November?

Hello Zoas23, I also live in the southern hemisphere. " Dew of May " is a term used by the classical authors, referring to its own hemisphere in relation to spring, I guess.

zoas23
01-15-2016, 02:56 AM
Hello Zoas23, I also live in the southern hemisphere. " Dew of May " is a term used by the classical authors, referring to its own hemisphere in relation to spring, I guess.

Thank you, I always try to understand if the reference is seasonal or astrological.
My guess was also that the reference may have astrological implications, but that it is mainly seasonal... thus "May" should be "November" for us.
(though a friend of mine who lives in my country insists that "May" is "May" everywhere... but never managed to explain me why).

alfr
01-15-2016, 06:35 AM
Hi Hellin Hermetist very interesting thread thanks

so please someone can give us also the reference title of book link etc where Samuel Cottereau Du Clos say he know of the experiment with one solvent for the gold made with manipulation of earth-marl

and also please someone can put the exact reference bibliographic of indication that Borello (petro borello : petrus borrelus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Borel ) published on the solvent made by dew may in the edition of the of him write of the 1711

very thants alfr