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Vlad
02-06-2009, 06:51 PM
See the pictures.

It's an ormus precipitate I made from volcanic sand. While letting it settle, it arranged itself into the triangular shape seen on the photos. I took them with a webcam and while moving the beaker the shape tilted upwards a bit.

Vlad
02-06-2009, 06:54 PM
As to how I made this batch and how to make ORMUS from volcanic sand...

I took the sand and put it in aqua regia first. This step is unnecessary for extracting 'ormus' but I performed it on this batch that showed the shape so it might have mattered for getting the shape to form although I don't know-understand how it could have. I used a standard 1 part HNO3 3 parts HCl mix I think.
(I then ether extracted this and used the extract which I why I wanted to put it in aqua regia)

Then I dried the sand and made a strong NaOH solution (several spoonfulls per liter) in a stainless steel pot and boiled for a few hours. Depending on how much potential 'ormus' your source material contains, this can be a very short time boiling (half an hour) up to a long time. Usually I boil two hours. When all the sodium hydroxide is 'used up' for reacting with the sand to form potential ormus, the pot will 'bang'. It's not dangerous but if it happens you'll notice it. That's the sign to stop boiling.

Then after cooling (the next day I think) I filtered the solution through a cotton towel. The sand can sometimes (usually) be used a few times.

Then I lowered the pH with phosphoric acid (80 something%). Vinegar can also be used and so can HCl.
(I think the use of phosphoric acid may have mattered perhaps for/in the formation of the triangular shape)

When I approached neutral pH, a chunky white precipitate started to form and drop, along with very fine fluffy white precipitate, the ormus precipitate.

Then I let the solution stand for the mixed precipitates to settle and when I came back to check if the precipitates had settled I saw the shape on the lower layer.

Now what is interesting about it is that this precipitate probably did not contain monoatomic gold or ormus gold, because I put the sand in aqua regia first and I think most gold forms would have dissolved in the aqua regia. Rhodium and iridium and maybe platina present would not have dissolved in the cold aqua regia and maybe be the probable major components of the ormus precipitate.

Here is how I would have continued after the mixed precipitates had settled after filtering:

Decant the solution and 'wash' twice by adding distilled water, mixing up the precipitate, and let it settle again.

Then add some HCl, just enough to acidify and a bit more. The solution should turn faint yellowish-green.
The ormus precipitate dissolves, the dirty one doesn't. It's mostly silica sodium reaction products that don't dissolve in HCl.

Decant the solution and save it. Add distilled water to the remaining precipitate, mix up, and decant and save again until you feel you have everything. I don't remember if I used to filter through a towel instead of decanting to leave the unimportant precipitate behind, but this could also work though could cause contamination from the towel.

Then take the yellow greenish solution and adjust the pH near neutral with a NaOH solution or just by adding sodium bicarbonate powder (fast and easy). The white fluffy precipitate drops again near pH 7. Then let it settle and wash with distilled water three times or more if you want all the salt out.

theFool
02-07-2009, 09:31 PM
Pretty nice work. I would like to ask you some questions after reading refining process of your post:
Here is how I would have continued after the mixed precipitates had settled after filtering:

Decant the solution and 'wash' twice by adding distilled water, mixing up the precipitate, and let it settle again.

Then add some HCl, just enough to acidify and a bit more. The solution should turn faint yellowish-green.
The ormus precipitate dissolves, the dirty one doesn't. It's mostly silica sodium reaction products that don't dissolve in HCl.

Decant the solution and save it. Add distilled water to the remaining precipitate, mix up, and decant and save again until you feel you have everything. I don't remember if I used to filter through a towel instead of decanting to leave the unimportant precipitate behind, but this could also work though could cause contamination from the towel.

Then take the yellow greenish solution and adjust the pH near neutral with a NaOH solution or just by adding sodium bicarbonate powder (fast and easy). The white fluffy precipitate drops again near pH 7. Then let it settle and wash with distilled water three times or more if you want all the salt out.
After the NaOH burn and subsequent cooling at room temp, I usually throw away all the precipitate and keep only the NaOH solution. Then after adding HCl, a white precip forms which I suppose it is pure ormus. I know that this is a wastefull process but I need purity to run some tests. Do you think that any other substance (silica?) can stay in solution (14 ph) and then precipitate with the HCl, giving impurities in the final product?

Also, when I come across a white precip and want to test for purity, I throw it into strong NaOH solution and expect to dissolve without leaving any residue. I base this on the fact that most hydroxides are insoluble. Could this be a sound way to test for ormus purity?

Thanks for sharing and circulating the knowlege around...

Vlad
02-08-2009, 02:57 PM
Do you think that any other substance (silica?) can stay in solution (14 ph) and then precipitate with the HCl, giving impurities in the final product?

Silica gel precipitate is dissolvable in high pH. It doesn't dissolve in HCl though, so that's why I go back to acid pH with HCl and filter and use the filtered solution and throw away the precipitate that didn't dissolve; ie the silica gel.


Also, when I come across a white precip and want to test for purity, I throw it into strong NaOH solution and expect to dissolve without leaving any residue. I base this on the fact that most hydroxides are insoluble. Could this be a sound way to test for ormus purity?

Silica gel dissolves at high pH so it won't be pure ormus. And some metals might dissolve too. As a rule I think metal oxides and hydroxides don't dissolve unless in acid, but there could be exceptions to the rule.