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elixirmixer
02-19-2017, 01:12 PM
If I were to say, take a fresh plant, chop it up and put it in a flask, then put it on a gentle heat, allowed for radical humidity to escape, and then attempted to induce putrefaction and blackness, would this be considered alchemical?

Awani
02-19-2017, 01:38 PM
Please don't create threads called "alchemy" or "alchemical" only. It makes it hard to understand what it is + all threads are about this regardless. Can you re-title this please.

:cool:

Kiorionis
02-19-2017, 01:39 PM
Why ever would you want to lose your radical humidity?

elixirmixer
02-19-2017, 01:49 PM
Please don't create threads called "alchemy" or "alchemical" only. It makes it hard to understand what it is + all threads are about this regardless. Can you re-title this please.

:cool:

How do I do that?


Why ever would you want to lose your radical humidity?

... Well.... I thought that you have to remove Radical Humidity in order from death to take place in the form of putrefaction....

Andro
02-19-2017, 01:53 PM
Please don't create threads called "alchemy" or "alchemical" only. It makes it hard to understand what it is + all threads are about this regardless. Can you re-title this please.

I've just re-titled it.

Also, elixirmixer, please refrain from 'flooding' the forums (too much).

It's difficult enough to keep track of ever-changing topics and lines of thought on single threads, and even more so on multiple threads.

Andro
02-19-2017, 01:59 PM
A question to consider in this context:

What do we usually do if we want to PREVENT plant matter from putrefying? Or, more generally, to prevent food from spoiling?

Kiorionis
02-19-2017, 02:45 PM
... Well.... I thought that you have to remove Radical Humidity in order from death to take place in the form of putrefaction....

I believe it's more common to remove the superfluous humidity. The superfluous Radical Humidity, practically, is kept in a separate flask in case it's needed to re-moisturize the work further along.

Andro
02-19-2017, 02:52 PM
The superfluous Radical Humidity

First time ever in my life that I see the words 'superfluous' and 'Radical Humidity' written side by side :)

Well, you're only a virgin once :p

Kiorionis
02-19-2017, 02:58 PM
But I'm a perpetual virgin (being a Virgo) ;)

I was trying to describe a process of distillation and cohobation/circulation (which apparently I did poorly at ha); I specifically remember reading that having enough radical humidity in the first place is one of the many challenges to lab work, and it's preservation is essential to success.

Andro
02-19-2017, 03:09 PM
having enough radical humidity in the first place is one of the many challenges to lab work, and it's preservation is essential to success.

Quite so, my dear Virgo :)

That's why there's no such thing (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6FBfAQ-NDE&feature=youtu.be&t=106) as 'superfluous' Radical Humidity...

And as far as the 'accidental' humidity is concerned... Off with its ugly head!

elixirmixer
02-26-2017, 08:37 AM
I am trying a different path of Spagyrics, this one, I believe, is called 'alchemy'

I have taken about 200grams of fresh organic garlic, roughly crushed it and sealed it in a 1 litre round bottom flask.

The goal here, is to raise up it's humidity, decend again, and then sneak in some I the moonlight and air once things settle down a bit.

Then, once putrefaction kicks in, I will be waiting patiently. I am new to these ancient methods, but the goal is to basically turn this entire mass of crushed garlic, into a fully conjoined tincture, using nothing but it's own juices.

I'm worried and excited. If anyone has attempted something like this, or if they know of authors who have written about this process, please shed some light for me, as I am basically running off intuition alone right now.

One Flask - One Fire - Heaps of Garlic

z0 K
02-26-2017, 03:43 PM
I am trying a different path of Spagyrics, this one, I believe, is called 'alchemy'

I have taken about 200grams of fresh organic garlic, roughly crushed it and sealed it in a 1 litre round bottom flask.

The goal here, is to raise up it's humidity, decend again, and then sneak in some I the moonlight and air once things settle down a bit.

Then, once putrefaction kicks in, I will be waiting patiently. I am new to these ancient methods, but the goal is to basically turn this entire mass of crushed garlic, into a fully conjoined tincture, using nothing but it's own juices.

I'm worried and excited. If anyone has attempted something like this, or if they know of authors who have written about this process, please shed some light for me, as I am basically running off intuition alone right now.

One Flask - One Fire - Heaps of Garlic

That is a helter skelter knee-jerk approach not alchemy. I suggest you get a basic microbiology text and read it. Also if your goal is to turn the garlic into a quintessence using nothing but its own juices I suggest you read Hollandus vegetable operas and and see if you can understand how to proceed.

Kiorionis
02-26-2017, 07:38 PM
If anyone has attempted something like this, or if they know of authors who have written about this process, please shed some light for me, as I am basically running off intuition alone right now.

I worked with some Melissa officinalis in a similar way and the only thing I got out of it was a nicely coloured and hairy fungus which wasn't good for anything but to look at.

I would recommend adding an appropriate amount of alcohol -- not so much to drown it out, but enough to sterilize the work. Not specifically how I would go about it, but it will be interesting to see what you do with it afterwards.

JDP
02-26-2017, 08:09 PM
"Alchemy" involves the use of a certain peculiar secret solvent, or "water", or "mercury", or whatever you want to call it, which preparation the alchemists have enshrouded in a thick veil of mystery, half-truths/half-lies and contradictions in order to make it particularly bothersome and difficult to discover how to make, and therefore discourage and frustrate the majority of seekers (whom the alchemists considered "unworthy" of knowing their trade; yes, the alchemists were not really a very "egalitarian" bunch but rather the opposite: elitists.) No secret solvent = NO alchemy. Period. No "ifs", "maybes" or "buts".

Andro
02-26-2017, 08:12 PM
Elixitmixer has already made his position quite clear when it comes to reading recommendations from members of this forum (see quote below).

So the best advice (IMO, of course) is to 'follow his intuition' and maybe learn something of value, through trial & error.

Who knows, he might even arrive at some interesting understandings or outcomes...


the vast majority of members on this forum have failed, showing that their GREAT PHILOSOPHICAL UNDERSTANDING is just silly theories, that they copied from old dead guys, after they read their books.

[...]

and also, to observe nature, and not a whole bunch of dead philosophers.

So what is it exactly that I don't know that you guys do? How to bathe in decades of reading? I've done all the same reading (although maybe not so much) as the rest of you. I understand the same principals as the rest of you, while you have 'believed' that I am in error because of my loose definition of the word Alchemy.

For all of my STUDENTS: HOW TO MAKE THE PHILOSOPHERS STONE (A brief un-detailed epistle) [...]

Schmuldvich
02-26-2017, 08:46 PM
"Alchemy" involves the use of a certain peculiar secret solvent, or "water", or "mercury", or whatever you want to call it, which preparation the alchemists have enshrouded in a thick veil of mystery, half-truths/half-lies and contradictions in order to make it particularly bothersome and difficult to discover how to make, and therefore discourage and frustrate the majority of seekers (whom the alchemists considered "unworthy" of knowing their trade; yes, the alchemists were not really a very "egalitarian" bunch but rather the opposite: elitists.) No secret solvent = NO alchemy. Period. No "ifs", "maybes" or "buts".



I, as a lover of truth and the natural arts and for many years an assiduous investigator and researcher into hidden secrets, have been able to peruse many writings of the Philosophers indeed as many as I, poor fellow that I am, have been able to do and have pondered and assimilated their parables, and have sometimes also (for reasons of expense) practised and worked hard at Vulcanism and have searched through the materials relating to the subject and have (praise be to God!) finally succeeded, to the extent that the Arcanum of the Art and of the tree of knowledge of Good and Evil has been made known and manifest to me, which is something that is indeed visible to all men even if they are not aware of it, and which is also a key and a tool of all the secret things to help bring them into the light and make them manifest. And so I found that this Arcanum should and must be the very beginning of the Philosophical Work as well as of all other particulars, because it is only through this Arcanum and medium in the laboratory that the fiery spirit that engages in fellowship with minerals and metals brings forth from those things their hidden secrets, instils a new life into dead bodies, and unexpectedly reveals itself in a clear, transparent and apprehensible body has making itself manifest.

-De Naturae Secretis Quibusdam Ad Vulcani, 1618

Quarrox
02-26-2017, 08:47 PM
You could try the Dr. Emoto - Rice Experiment (interesting man, i visited a presentation of him several years ago). Many times repeated by youtubers, though most of them worked with a variation. They took cooked rice and placed a portion of it in 3 disinfected glass jars and sealed them. One was labeled with "i love you" and the like, the other one with "i hate you", and the third one was ignored. Every day they talked lovely to jar 1 and thought about love and the alike, the second one was ranted at and thought with negative, hateful thoughts at. The third one, as stated, was ignored for the whole duration of the experiment, let's say 30 days.

Most reported, that rice 1 remained white and clean, while the rice in jar 2 and 3 was covered in mold and black, rotten liquid. The idea behind it is, that water has a memory and can transport emotions. Is it alchemy or not? I cannot judge it. Would be nice if someone would be ready to repeat the experiment.

elixirmixer
03-01-2017, 10:11 PM
So I began this garlic experiment, but, unfortunatly, I'll have to start again. I did not seal the flask, and it was floating in a warm water bath, and at some stage, probably due to has build up, it popped open and the garlic juices went all trough the dirty water.

I'll try again, but the results I was getting looked very interested. After three days in flask (no air) it was turning a pink colour. There is promise behind this, and in fact, I'm extremely excited right now because this failed experiment has given me a HUGE lesson in philosophical understandings.

Avatar
09-13-2017, 05:07 PM
I have a similar experiment I will be starting soon.
It takes dirt as the start.
Initially taking green plant. Composting it quickly until on its own it reaches 130-160F.
Then letting it fall into the 70-100 range of decimposition to digest for a while, giving it time to decompose the tougher fibers.
In this bacteria and fungi are killed off by the high heat before digestion, both being first done by natural means.

Anyway. This is my starting point. From here I have at least 5 or more variable directions to go in.

Most likely will use the six keys of eudoxus as practical reference and inspiration.

I suppose the hardest operation will be initial cultivation of thermophilic bacteria in my compost before any fungi or other organisms thrive.

Also. Dryness is that which preserves and stops putrification.
Too much water drowns and putrification becomes anaerobic (without oxygen).

If you moisten without drowning, an your vessel is open, you will get aerobic putrification (with oxygen).

If your putrification is foul smelling, it is due to high nitrogen low carbon. If it is sweet smelling, you have reached the g spot of putrification.
You can look up the C:N ratio in many substances.
Sometimes yah gatta wing it.

I do apologize if my post seems rushed.

Kiorionis
09-13-2017, 06:25 PM
I have a similar experiment I will be starting soon.
It takes dirt as the start.
Initially taking green plant. Composting it quickly until on its own it reaches 130-160F.


I like this experiment.

Awhile ago my dad kept all his grass clippings in a huge pile, probably ended up sitting for a few years and reached a good 6 feet high.

I was there when he finally decided to dig it up and get rid of it. The top most layer was a dark green. From there, as we dug into the center of the pile, the colors changed from dark green to light green to a dried-grass yellow and at the very center was an incredible red.

Now I wish I would have saved all the red grass. Would have been interesting to work with

Avatar
09-14-2017, 03:14 PM
Kiorionis.
The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?

As to working with garlic.
I would suggest crushing and drying the garlic slowly. That way you can add and control the moisture level.

Luxus
09-14-2017, 03:25 PM
I had been thinking of a similar experiment. You should encourage rotting, let it rot until it can rot no more and in this way all that is perishable has been consumed and what remains is the imperishable.

Avatar
09-14-2017, 04:52 PM
Luxus.
Yes yes!
That is why I wish to encourage the internal rotting which thrives at 130-160F.
In order to self sterilize while preserving the rotting process.
Then I will let it drop to 70-100, thus it will rot slower.

There are 4 decomposing bacteria that thrive off carbon and nitrogen. Each of the 4 thrives in a different heat range.
The hottest decomposes quickly like a raging fire.
The coolest is like a warm bath.

I presume if I can so call sterilize it with its own heat, then I can play with the temperature ranges with less fear of contaminates.
I will be using a water bath.
Going above 160F will kill the rotting process I believe.
Sunlight (UV) will also kill it.

Interesting topic.
Look up mulch fires.
It's dirt that self ignited due to too much heat.

Kiorionis
09-14-2017, 09:06 PM
Kiorionis.
The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?

I would imagine so. But it was still interesting to see in a naturally developed way.

Luxus
09-15-2017, 02:30 PM
When something has rotted until it can rot no more it has self sterilised itself in its own natural fire. No bacteria can live in it because no sustenance can be had from what remains, no fungus can live in it for the same reason. What remains after the test of putrefaction has withstood the test of nature and triumphed, It has stood the test of time!

Lux Natura
09-15-2017, 04:36 PM
Kiorionis.
The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?


Most grass mix includes creeping red fescue for several reasons - tolerates poor soil and cool weather, among other things.

Likely what is happening is the heat of decomposition + moisture in the pile is causing some of the red pigments to be extracted.

You could find purple oil, which would come from the perennial rye grass - which is also often part of grass mix.

Avatar
09-22-2017, 06:48 AM
I will experiment soon.
Many green plants sweat red.

It is an interesting fact. Anyone who has lived in a hot desert has seen it. Burned plants.
When a leaf is half white, then back then red then green.
Not all plants are meant to be grown in the desert, yet we do force it.

Pine trees are the only plant I had issue bleaching white with the sun.

I am a poor ascetic. A simple drunkard.
So, what is a common plant with a unique oil color?
A green plant with a color other than red.
Yes the plant must be green.

Dragon's Tail
09-22-2017, 01:47 PM
I've been working with a lot of red-cedar(Juniperus Virginiana) and the plant will dry from green to brown, but if the green sprigs are put in a sealed container, it will putrefy, and it seems quite impervious to infections, even the white molds that will show up on pieces that are not submerged.

I add some distilled water or rainwater to aid the process, as the needles are kind of dry to begin with, and I've never had luck without adding something. If left to circulate, you will most definitely end up with a thick red soup in your glass. This was my whole setup, left outside to putrefy, I posted it somewhere else on the forum too. I was a giant pickle jar with a martini glass inserted into the mouth. It wasn't hermetically sealed, and it was left outside where it could be warmed by the sun during the day. I think the whole process took a month or two before I stopped it, and ashened the starting material.

As for colors other than red... I can't say, at least by this process. But I do see a lot of plants (weeds) that have purple veins and stuff, especially when they are "scorched" a bit by getting too much sunlight. One is a mint that I can't positively identify yet, the locals call it horse mint, and it's smell is similar to bee balm. I think nettles exhibit this kind of behavior as well. I haven't tried, but they might make a purple soup.