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Amon
03-20-2017, 05:15 PM
Greetings everyone,

I am currently undertaking a project which requires a little bit of glass cutting (open holes in glass bottles) and i was thinking if anyone knows of any methods that would be preferable to simply using a drill.

Kiorionis
03-20-2017, 06:10 PM
The only method I know of, without a glass furnace, is used to cut glass, but not drill a whole...

Aham
03-20-2017, 06:38 PM
Hi Amon,

I've used the following items with a drill:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ODSS5NO
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00269T4K0

Worked really well for me. Just have to be a little patient and not force the drill.

JDP
03-20-2017, 06:54 PM
Greetings everyone,

I am currently undertaking a project which requires a little bit of glass cutting (open holes in glass bottles) and i was thinking if anyone knows of any methods that would be preferable to simply using a drill.

Hydrofluoric acid dissolves glass, but is pretty dangerous to work with. Not recommended unless you have a well ventilated working space to use it.

theFool
03-20-2017, 09:36 PM
Monten alkalis dissolve glass (for example NaOH, it melts at low temperature)
There is also a method of opening hole by igniting a mix of sulfur and nitre on the glass but I'm not sure if it really works or if it breaks the glass.

If you find a way to open a hole successfully we would be interested to give us some feedback on the method.

Florius Frammel
03-26-2017, 08:16 PM
The operation to dissolve a stone (made of mostly SiO2) with NaOH (must be concentrated, dangerous!) is similar to what you describe. It was a favourite chemical reaction of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. What you get after doing this is a so called "Wasserglas (liquid glass)". With this stuff you can do pretty nice chemical gardens with all kinds of colourful salts like Coppersulfate and/or Potassium permanganate. Glauber was the first who did this I think. Or at least he was the one who has written it down and was famous enough.
Never would I work with hydrofluoric acid. It's pretty lethal.

JDP
03-26-2017, 09:47 PM
The operation to dissolve a stone (made of mostly SiO2) with NaOH (must be concentrated, dangerous!) is similar to what you describe. It was a favourite chemical reaction of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. What you get after doing this is a so called "Wasserglas (liquid glass)". With this stuff you can do pretty nice chemical gardens with all kinds of colourful salts like Coppersulfate and/or Potassium permanganate. Glauber was the first who did this I think. Or at least he was the one who has written it down and was famous enough.
Never would I work with hydrofluoric acid. It's pretty lethal.

Actually Glauber, Goethe and the like made the "liquid glass" by melting silica (like sand or crushed pebbles) with potassium or sodium carbonate. The operation is not dangerous. You only have to be careful that while the mixture is melting it does not "boil" over the crucible, as it bubbles a lot. This can be avoided by not loading all the mixture into the crucible at once, but only a spoonful at a time. First load the crucible with a spoonful of the mixture, put it in the furnace, and when it is red hot the smaller quantity of the mixture inside the crucible will melt and bubble. Wait until it settles down. Then add another spoonful of the mixture, wait a little bit for the reaction to settle down, then add another spoonful, wait a bit, and so forth until you run out of mixture or the crucible is too full of the molten "liquid glass" to continue the operation.

Ghislain
03-27-2017, 08:34 AM
You can dissolve silica with caustic soda. Don't get it on your ceramic hob...I made that mistake :(

Ghislain