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View Full Version : Various Poisonous Plants (Nutmeg, Deadly Nightshade etc...)



Clayrn Darrow
02-14-2009, 05:09 PM
link to picture broken

This plant is extremely colorful, often used for ornamental purposes. It has berries which ripen to reveal a subtle, yet dangerous toxin. The green berries are the most toxic part of Lantana Camara. In Florida, it is especially dangerous because of it's wide use in landscaping. A few berries have a enough poison to kill a child. Be careful with this one.

Awani
02-15-2009, 11:09 AM
http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h18/deviadah/forum/muskot.jpg

In low doses, nutmeg produces no noticeable physiological or neurological response. Large doses of 60 g (~12 teaspoons) or more are dangerous, potentially inducing convulsions, palpitations, nausea, eventual dehydration, and generalized body pain.

In amounts of 10-40 g (~2-8 teaspoons) it is a mild to medium hallucinogen, producing visual distortions and a distinct euphoria. Nutmeg contains myristicin, a weak monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

Speculative comparisons between the effects of nutmeg intoxication and MDMA have been made. However, nutmeg contains no amphetamine derivatives nor are any formed in the body from the main chemical components of nutmeg.

Use of nutmeg as a recreational drug is unpopular due to its unpleasant taste and its side effects, including dizziness, flushes, dry mouth, accelerated heartbeat, temporary constipation, difficulty in urination, nausea, and panic. A user will not experience a peak until approximately six hours after ingestion, and effects can linger for up to three days afterwards.

A risk in any large-quantity (over 25 g, ~5 teaspoons) ingestion of nutmeg is the onset of 'nutmeg poisoning', an acute psychiatric disorder marked by thought disorder, a sense of impending doom/death, and agitation. Some cases have resulted in hospitalization.

Intravenous injection of nutmeg is extremely dangerous and can be fatal.

Nutmeg was once considered an abortifacient, but may be safe for culinary use during pregnancy. However, it inhibits prostaglandin production and contains hallucinogens that may affect the fetus if consumed in large quantities. - source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutmeg#Psychoactivity_and_Toxicity)

:cool:

This should really go in the practical alchemy forums (we should create one for plants/herbs)!

Edit: new sub-forum HERE (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=76)

Aleilius
02-15-2009, 12:48 PM
Yes, a new sub-section is great!

I'm a fan of the nightshades.

I've got a few of these growing in my backyard: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_americanum
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_americanum)



Source: http://texnat.tamu.edu/cmplants/toxic/plants/black-nightshade.html

Black nightshade, also called deadly nightshade, was known in the past as Solanum americanum or Solanum nigrum. This plant is a dark green, slender-branched, hairless annual growing as tall as 3 feet. The gently pointed oval leaves have smooth margins. White or purple- tinged flowers are about 0.25 inch in diameter. They give rise to small clusters of round, green fruit that turn black at maturity.

pic link broken

Clayrn Darrow
02-15-2009, 11:56 PM
Brilliant idea!

Clayrn Darrow
02-26-2009, 12:21 AM
picture link broken

I wish to explore Angel's Trumpet for a while, partially because I have encountered a crushed specimen on my way home today. We know, or shall observe, that this flower is of the Nightshade family and is appropriately known as Datura suaveolens. It is normally used as an ornamental plant, and for this reason one must take caution--It is an extremely poisonous plant!

Now, if you break one of the petals apart you will notice a light sweet musk-like smell akin to a body oil; reader take note: Datura suaveolens grown in the southeastern United States do not exhibit the same flowering properties as specimens grown elsewhere--Southern Angel's Trumpets do not bear fruit! This is important in identifying the plant.

The secretions from broken stems and petals are highly toxic . Even more harmful, are the black seeds that may be found on older specimens. I refer to one more skilled than I, the botanist Asa Gray--"(of the seeds of Datura variants in the Nightshade family)[†of the poisonous aspects] "..a marked variety which may be perpetuated from the seed.1887" In certain parts of the world, teas are created from the stewed leaves, however; I should advise against the consumption of this ..heheh---really please do not drink any Nightshade teas--even if they start serving them at Starbucks.

How you know for certain that you've been poisoned by Angel's Trumpet

Here are some of the symptoms(occurs within minutes of consuming any fluid secreted from the plant)
Intense thirst
blurred vision
High fever
Weak and rapid heartbeat

Convulsions, Coma and blindness-----or death.


NOTE: The consumption of seeds and/or uncooked leaves will not have an immediate affect upon the body. In such a case that one mistakenly consumes the seeds or leaves, symptoms may take hours to develop--ample time to get oneself to their local poison control center, or the neighborhood alchemist!


In Grace,
Clayrn Darrow
M.IV


Source: Experience and
The Elements of Botany--Asa Gray
Poisonous plants found in field and Garden--Wilma Roberts James

Rab
03-02-2009, 12:46 PM
Here is one that I see a lot of in Florida, near wet areas. The spotted water hemlock:

Link to picture HERE (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Cicutamaculata.jpg) (picture size too large! / deviadah (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/member.php?u=1))

The picture is of Cicuta maculata, which is the common species here. It is among the deadliest plants in North America. Unfortunately it is very close in appearance to wild carrots and a few other edible species, and so it kills foraging animals and sometimes people.

The roots are pale and exude a brown sap. It has a sweet taste. Ingesting even a miniscule quantity can cause death or permanent damage.

Interestingly, the water hemlocks are related to carrots (Family Apiaceae). Tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, etc are nightshades (Family Solanaceae). Isn't it interesting that some of our most toxic plants are in the same family with those that provide food?

Clayrn Darrow
03-23-2009, 03:23 PM
Here is one that I see a lot of in Florida, near wet areas. The spotted water hemlock:

Link to picture HERE (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Cicutamaculata.jpg) (picture size too large! / deviadah (http://forum.alchemyforums.com/member.php?u=1))

The picture is of Cicuta maculata, which is the common species here. It is among the deadliest plants in North America. Unfortunately it is very close in appearance to wild carrots and a few other edible species, and so it kills foraging animals and sometimes people.

The roots are pale and exude a brown sap. It has a sweet taste. Ingesting even a miniscule quantity can cause death or permanent damage.

Interestingly, the water hemlocks are related to carrots (Family Apiaceae). Tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, etc are nightshades (Family Solanaceae). Isn't it interesting that some of our most toxic plants are in the same family with those that provide food?

I have seen this plant type around town--used for decorative purposes.

rockfate1111
09-29-2009, 09:01 PM
Yes, a new sub-section is great!

I'm a fan of the nightshades.

I've got a few of these growing in my backyard: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_americanum
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanum_americanum)



Wow, I used to smash these berries in my fingers all the time when I was a young... nightshade grew behind the shed in the backyard. I did not know thats what those were till I saw the picture just now. Glad I never ate any!


Peace,

solomon levi
09-29-2009, 10:16 PM
I really love the nightshades too.
I was just thinking about them last night.
I know some parks where there is lots of bittersweet nightshade
and poison oak. For some reason I was thinking of making a tincture
of the combination of the two.

Ab Roek
09-30-2009, 05:27 AM
I have some experience with using nutmeg for inner exploration.

First of all, it was hard getting down the amount necessary for significant altered states of mind. Using gelcaps proved essentially impractical because of the number needed. Myself and a friend ended up just forcing down many spoonfuls of powdered nutmeg with some juice and water. Gagging was frequent, the impulse to vomit had to be fought. Over a decade later now, I still cannot stand even a hint of nutmeg in food because of the instinctive revulsion it provokes.

If you can get past these hurdles, and you are an unusually level-headed person, you may want to consider it. I recommend that you have someone with you who isn't under the influence.

My friend and I did roughly the same dose at the same time, probably 8-10 heaping teaspoons, and we did this while we had a few days to camp in the woods. The setting was ideal, but two people together under the influence of this substance, without a grounding presence, was not ideal. After an hour or so we began to notice a psychic connection with the living things around us, particularly the trees. We also began to experience a close psychic attunement with one another. We had some pretty valuable direct insights about the life force. The effects began to peak after about 5 or 6 hours (we kept notes for as long as we were coherent). The peak itself was quite lasting, continuing for around 6-8 hours. Meanwhile, the perception of time was greatly altered. After an hour or so of peaking, we were swallowed up in a semi-eternity, with some small connection to the physical world. We became increasingly incoherent. The experience was overall quite pleasant and instructive, on many levels, however when night fell, we did not have enough wits left to stay in our tent. We began to wander in the forest, and became lost for several hours. Eventually a friendly hunting dog found us (an actual physical dog, I think it was a bloodhound). The dog led us back to a hiking trail and we were able to find our way back to camp, the dog guiding all the while. We thanked the dog profusely, and as we were exhausted mentally and physically, tried to sleep, while still quite inebriated. We did end up getting a little sleep at last, and when we woke up we pieced together the experience. We were glad that we had undertaken it, SNAFUs aside.

WCH
10-01-2009, 05:48 PM
I wonder if there's a good (safe) way to do an extraction of nutmeg.

I guess the basic spagyric technique of soaking in alcohol for two weeks, straining and washing the strained matter repeatedly and then evaporating the solution would probably at least remove some of the extraneous plant matter and make it easier to ingest... but I can't say for sure, and it could be dangerous.

solomon levi
10-13-2009, 05:28 PM
I wonder if there's a good (safe) way to do an extraction of nutmeg.

I guess the basic spagyric technique of soaking in alcohol for two weeks, straining and washing the strained matter repeatedly and then evaporating the solution would probably at least remove some of the extraneous plant matter and make it easier to ingest... but I can't say for sure, and it could be dangerous.

From what I've read, people seem to think the properties are in the oil.
If so, a cool acetone maceration (cool because acetone evaporates easily)
for one week should cause the oil of any herb to float on top. Pour the mixture
in a narrow tall glass and you should be able to remove the oil with a dropper.

This could be dangerous due to the potency, so one should consider how many
grams of material one started with, and then your body weight, and divide the
amount of oil recovered accordingly. Still, could be really dangerous. If you try it,
start with just a couple drops and see if anything happens.

I have not tried this myself.

:)

MarkostheGnostic
12-07-2009, 05:01 AM
http://forum.alchemyforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=186&stc=1&d=1260161602

Against the far fence. It's clones are in 5 other locations on my property. I like the look, scent and mystique. It was growing around the hot tub (not shown) until the tree-removal guys smashed that one. It has begun to grow back.

This 'Devil's Weed,' an "ally" in the early Casteneda Don Juan Matus books, I have unfortunately had dealings with as an addictions counselor in Miami. I remember it being a problem in Maryland s well for inquisitive but ignorant adolescents. It used to be the ingredient in a smokable medicine (for kids even!) called 'Asthmador' - for asthmatics. I had an acquaintance who put himself in the hospital with 'true hallucinations' and who had to be restrained. Belledonna and the like are referred to as "nightmare alkaloids."