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Awani
08-14-2017, 03:41 PM
Not sure if this has been posted. Found this nice pdf.

PDF here:

http://www.holybooks.com/wp-content/uploads/CodexSeraphinianus.pdf

:p

Illen A. Cluf
08-14-2017, 04:07 PM
Do you happen to know what language it was written in?

Thanks.

Illen A. Cluf
08-14-2017, 04:15 PM
Just found what I was asking about:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Seraphinianus

zoas23
08-14-2017, 04:22 PM
Do you happen to know what language it was written in?
Thanks.

After having many persons trying to decipher the "code" without any success, the author confessed that it's actually an asemic alphabet... so there is no "code" to decipher and it was written and illustrated as to provide a somehow surreal experience.

I have many friends who are into asemic languages (all of them artists with an interest in calligraphy).

If you enjoyed that book, you may like this artist, Łukasz Grochocki:
http://salonarcano.com.ar/galeria/contenidos/plastica/lucasz_grochocki/index2.html
His language is not asemic, but for the viewer / reader it's almost as if it was asemic... because it's an invented language and I think that he's the only one that knows it (I know he doesn't write "random letters", but he invented a language that only he can read). I like his works... it is not too far from the experience of the Seraphinianus (though according to the author of the Seraphinianus, it is 100% "random symbols" without any meaning, even for him).

Or you may enjoy the works by Isidore Isou, which are somewhere "in between" French and an asemic scripture:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wszduSvpAC4/U44QY5qfDvI/AAAAAAAAASo/B0Tju_s_an4/s1600/f3d07bf06a3d92f044004e194285fabb.gif

Brion Gysin did it too:
https://d32dm0rphc51dk.cloudfront.net/FEMRIILrEYs9Wct28TDLxQ/large.jpg

And I specially enjoy those who have taken the opposite path and attempted to created an iconographic language that could work as some sort of "instant esperanto" (Kircher tried to do it, but it was a failed experiment).

Illen A. Cluf
08-14-2017, 05:21 PM
Thanks, Zoas! Quite amazing and very creative. What was especially fascinating about the Seraphinius text were the amazing and detailed pictures. All these remind me a little of the mysterious Voynich manuscript:

http://ixoloxi.com/voynich/pdf/en/vms-quire1-en.pdf

zoas23
08-14-2017, 06:19 PM
Thanks, Zoas! Quit amazing and very creative. What was especially fascinating about the Seraphinius text were the amazing and detailed pictures. All these remind me a little of the mysterious Voynich manuscript:

http://ixoloxi.com/voynich/pdf/en/vms-quire1-en.pdf

:) No problem.
I'm not a huge fan of the Seraphinianus, but because I think it is the kind of book that was written as a nice "birthday gift" when you are lost about which present to give. It's not bad either, but hardly a fascination for me.

I have no doubts that the infamous Voynich doesn't simply come to your mind, but that it was the #1 "inspiration" for the Seraphinianus.

For some reason I like these "alternative languages" and there are many categories:
1) Asemic languages: Seraphinianus, Isidore Isou, Brion Gysin.
2) "Channeled" languages: the Lingua Ignota of Hildegard von Bingen, the Enochian of Dee and Kelley.
3) Cipher languages: Johannes Trithemius, Agrippa gives some examples too, many etceteras.
4) Iconographic Languages: Kircher and Leibniz worked a lot on them... trying to make a language that you can read without "having to learn how to read it".
5) Sound poetry / phonetic poetry: i.e, poetry made out of sounds without any logical meaning... the German Dadá artists were mostly the first ones I know who did such thing (Raoul Hausmann and Kurt Schwitters). Antonin Artaud also included some phonetic poems in the middle of some of his texts (i.e, "To have done with the judgement of God"), but in his case I believe that he considered that they had a magical value and were far from a "Dadá game".
6) Polyglot languages: James Joyce (specially in Finnegans Wake), the lesser known argentineans Xul Solar and Oliverio Girondo (in some of his poems).

This is not a complete list... and some other languages don't fit into any of these categories (i.e, the "Sigils" of Austin Spare).

... but for me it is interesting when we (humans) try to use language to transcend language and go further. It is somehow like trying to repair the "Babel Crisis".

Schmuldvich
08-14-2017, 06:58 PM
Or you may enjoy the works by Isidore Isou, which are somewhere "in between" French and an asemic scripture:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wszduSvpAC4/U44QY5qfDvI/AAAAAAAAASo/B0Tju_s_an4/s1600/f3d07bf06a3d92f044004e194285fabb.gif

Brion Gysin did it too:
https://d32dm0rphc51dk.cloudfront.net/FEMRIILrEYs9Wct28TDLxQ/large.jpg

For some reason I like these "alternative languages" and there are many categories:
1) Asemic languages: Seraphinianus, Isidore Isou, Brion Gysin.
2) "Channeled" languages: the Lingua Ignota of Hildegard von Bingen, the Enochian of Dee and Kelley.
3) Cipher languages: Johannes Trithemius, Agrippa gives some examples too, many etceteras.
4) Iconographic Languages: Kircher and Leibniz worked a lot on them... trying to make a language that you can read without "having to learn how to read it".
5) Sound poetry / phonetic poetry: i.e, poetry made out of sounds without any logical meaning... the German Dadá artists were mostly the first ones I know who did such thing (Raoul Hausmann and Kurt Schwitters). Antonin Artaud also included some phonetic poems in the middle of some of his texts (i.e, "To have done with the judgement of God"), but in his case I believe that he considered that they had a magical value and were far from a "Dadá game".
6) Polyglot languages: James Joyce (specially in Finnegans Wake), the lesser known argentineans Xul Solar and Oliverio Girondo (in some of his poems).

This is not a complete list... and some other languages don't fit into any of these categories (i.e, the "Sigils" of Austin Spare).

... but for me it is interesting when we (humans) try to use language to transcend language and go further. It is somehow like trying to repair the "Babel Crisis".

That's really neat, zoas! Thanks for sharing!


The "Codex Seraphinianus" is pretty cool too but doesn't hold my interest. I like how zoas put it...it's a nice "birthday gift".

Awani
08-14-2017, 08:59 PM
I like the images. I don't care about the messenger, if the "message" speaks to me. Sieg Heil etc.

:p

zoas23
08-14-2017, 09:27 PM
I like the images. I don't care about the messenger, if the "message" speaks to me. Sieg Heil etc.
:p

I think it was designed almost as an artist's book with the intention of providing an experience somehow similar to the one that the Voynich provides, though with a surreal twist.
LOL... I don't really know anyone who has a problem with Luigi Serafini... He is not exactly controversial. So the messenger is not truly problematic here.
As for the message... it is what it is. It's a nice book, I don't know anyone who would say that it's his favourite book... but it's a nice curiosity.
In some way it challenges the idea of what a book is (i.e, you can't read it in a literal way, but probably you can imagine what the text would say... and somehow project your own ideas there... so that's fine).

Hasta la victoria siempre, etc.