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Dragon's Tail
11-01-2017, 03:28 AM
Other than the more complicated setup and cleaning, does the mass that remains on the heat retain all of the qualities of preparing a salt or earth by any other method? Will I still end up with the mineral content roughly the same as ordinary calcining?

I've extracted about all I can out of the beebalm experiment, and the last alcohol solution is tinted but still clear enough to see through. I'm making preparations to calcine the feces and just wondering if first dry-distilling them would "ruin" them in any kind of way. Looking at this from a chemical standpoint, of course. I've been thinking about how to use the ash for a special kind of circulation with the fully darkened portion of the tincture.

Kiorionis
11-01-2017, 01:00 PM
The difference is that a dry distillation in a closed system is a process of pyrolysis, which occurs without oxygen and other atmospheric compounds.

What changes that makes to the mineral content, I'm not sure.

Dragon's Tail
11-01-2017, 01:16 PM
Right. I'm thinking that most plant ash is carbonates, but curious if those carbonates are already formed in the plant material, or if they come as a result of "cooking" in air. I've made ashes before without the material going to flame, by heating fresh plant material carefully in a pot, and it sure smelled like a dry distillation product (from a distance, I wasn't brave/silly enough to sniff the fumes). I even noted 3 phases at different temperatures, the water, the white smoke, and the yellow smoke. But enough oxygen may have gotten in to reduce the ash as carbonates. I'm not sure.

elixirmixer
11-02-2017, 04:02 AM
Kiorionis is right. Closed system, no oxygen or at least very little. I doubt its going to effect the ashes negatively, however im not 100% sure. It certainly makes a big difference to the other compounds! That white smoke which distills over as a yellow tar, is the way it is because of a lack of oxygen. As soon as the air gets to it, putrifaction sets in and it goes black.

It doesnt matter if you made carbonates or not. what matters is that the salts are water soluable and contain the essential minerals you desire, which they will. A carbonate is just a functional group, it is a gateway for other things to interact with your Potassium/Sodium/Iodine ect... Your not losing anything of value I assure you.

Dragon's Tail
11-02-2017, 04:07 AM
Thanks elixirmixir. I think you are right. The important stuff is still in the mash, but it still makes me curious to wonder if some of the metallic ions might distill over with the other products. Then again, most distillation bi-products seem to be hydrocarbons of one type or another.

elixirmixer
11-02-2017, 05:01 AM
Very unlikely that any metallic ions will distill over.

Example: Dry distillation of Lead acetate at 600 degrees, NO lead is found in the recieving flask. Like less than 5 parts per billion; untraceable.

Obviously every scenario is different and you can never guarantee, however, im pretty confident that you wont be getting metals going over, especially at the temperatures your working with.

JDP
11-02-2017, 12:33 PM
Very unlikely that any metallic ions will distill over.

Example: Dry distillation of Lead acetate at 600 degrees, NO lead is found in the recieving flask. Like less than 5 parts per billion; untraceable.

Obviously every scenario is different and you can never guarantee, however, im pretty confident that you wont be getting metals going over, especially at the temperatures your working with.

On the other hand, if you try it with zinc acetate, which unlike lead it does form volatile zinc compounds during its thermal decomposition, you will find the presence of this metal in the receiver, condenser and stillhead.

elixirmixer
11-02-2017, 09:44 PM
Ah yes I remember you saying JDP.

Thanks for the reminder. Are these comlunds toxic?

Dragon's Tail
11-02-2017, 11:18 PM
You guys are a wealth of knowledge. Next step is to find out if dry distillation of the plant matter is even feasible with my limited setup. Not sure how much I can get out of my little hotplate, and also worried about the possibility of busting glass. And it's getting a bit too cold to take it outside especially considering how long it might take to distill everything. Still a lot to consider, but thanks for all of the great information.

elixirmixer
11-02-2017, 11:46 PM
If your glass is from china it will most likely crack. I go through flasks faster than condoms.

Dragon's Tail
11-03-2017, 12:35 AM
If your glass is from china it will most likely crack. I go through flasks faster than condoms.

:D
Good to know. Seems like I wouldn't want to use good glass like quartz though, unless I was certain that I needed to do it. Might pass on the beebalm dry-distilling and construct a metal contraption for such things. If I manage to dissolve a little copper, meh, no bigs. I'll be redistilling the biproducts anyway at some point. The other thing too is that it's such a fiddling small amount (about 1/8th of a mason jar as a fine powder) that it might not be worth it at this point. Let me break out my pot real quick and fire this sucker up.

I also learned that bee-balm tincture is frickin delicious. Six drops makes tea or beer or anything taste wonderful, leaves a minty aftertaste, and knocked me right out when I laid down last night. But I'll talk more about that when I do the next write-up on the experiment.