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Dragon's Tail
01-06-2018, 03:44 AM
Parsley tops the list (per 100g):

https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/nutrients/report/nutrientsfrm?max=25&offset=0&totCount=0&nutrient1=306&nutrient2=&nutrient3=&subset=0&sort=c&measureby=g

Found this cool calculator on the USDA website. Tell it to sort by concentration and whatever you are looking for, you will find it. I'm a fan of parsley because my mother cooks my favorite dish with it, like, a LOT of it :) But I didn't suspect that it would show up for this particular search. If it's a high K2CO3 concentration that you are looking for in an herb (more yield from ashes), here you go.

Also Basil, lots of pepper-type plants, and thyme

elixirmixer
01-06-2018, 04:17 AM
I've heard that grapevine ashes are especially rich in K. Think I might have read that from Robert Bartlett.

Dragon's Tail
01-11-2018, 04:52 AM
Most hardwoods, from what I've always been told, are best for extracting lye, and I think they lean to the potassium side vs sodium, which is found in green leafies, especially aquatic plants. Since grape vines are deciduous, I would expect that you are correct in them being rich in the potassium ion when reduced to salt.

Florius Frammel
01-11-2018, 05:59 AM
Concerning trees, elms seem to have the highest content of K2CO3. Much more like for example oaks.

Dragon's Tail
01-11-2018, 03:42 PM
Concerning trees, elms seem to have the highest content of K2CO3. Much more like for example oaks.

Thanks kindly Florius. I have always heard oaks, but this is interesting if one has elm wood handy. Perhaps people only say oak because it is so common and easy to identify to most everyone (acorns)

Florius Frammel
01-11-2018, 04:19 PM
Or maybe because alchemical texts and pictures often refer to oaks. The K2CO3 content is not the reason. In my opinion.