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Florius Frammel
02-07-2019, 02:04 PM
This guy was a doctor and obviously a member of the GuR.
He published or was somehow involved into some of the most interesting books of that period of time like:

Compass of the Wise

Hermes Trismegists true and natural path

Die sieben heiligen Grundsäulen der Ewigkeit und Zeit

Das hermetische A.B.C.

His Pseudonyms were:

Adam Melchior Birkholz
Adama(h) Booz
Michael Birchwood
ICH (according to some researches, though I doubt it)

The researches Ferguson, Knopp and/or Ferchel claimed he had published under the name "Philovite" as well.

That book they have in mind seems to be quite rare online but can be found here:


Die aus dem Hermetischen Brunnen hervorquellende Wahrheit : Oder: Die wahre Solarische und Lunarische Quintessenz; Der Wurzelbalsam alles Wesens, und Ursprung alles Lebens. Die Universallatwerge (https://digital.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/werkansicht?PPN=PPN1014319587&PHYSID=PHYS_0001&DMDID=)

However it is obviously said on the first page that the translator was AdaMa Booz and the original book was french by said Philovite -of course a frenchman and not identical with Birkholz.

The french original version can be found here:
La vérité sortant du puits hermétique ou La vraye quintessence solaire et ... (https://books.google.de/books?id=BfQTAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Cosmocole+Philovite%22&hl=de&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj9-tnh4qngAhVHM-wKHW0bCMIQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q&f=false)

vigilance
02-07-2019, 02:52 PM
I've never heard of him before, but I did a quick search on my harddrive:

The Rose Cross and the Age of Reason (Christopher Macintosh) has the following footnote re: Compass


23 Ketmia Vere ,Der Compass der Weisen (Berlin/Leipzig, Ringmacher, 1779). Wolfstieg (entry 42501) says that "Ketmia Vere" is a pseudonym for Adam Michael Birkholz. The book has also been attributed to the alchemist Jollifief.


I believe the "adama(h) booz" comes from a text I have as "Taschenbuch für Alchemisten Theosophen" or at least it's mentioned there:

http://i.imgur.com/G1QwvVp.jpg


"Philovite" I only have come up in, like you mention, Ferguson's Biblitheca Chemica, and the Innes Catalogue. The entry is mostly based on Ferguson, it would seem, but is slightly different.

Florius Frammel
02-07-2019, 03:25 PM
According to Frick, Ketmia Vere wasn't Birkholz, but Schleiss von Löwenfeld.

The author of the german quote you posted is uncertain about the authorship too.

vigilance
02-07-2019, 04:05 PM
According to Frick, Ketmia Vere wasn't Birkholz, but Schleiss von Löwenfeld.

The author of the german quote you posted is uncertain about the authorship too.

Now with those names, I have an old message thread from here (alchemyforums) saved, on the subject of the Compass of the Wise. It discusses a lot of this.

Everything I'm bringing up on this returns back to GuR. I'm mostly familiar with Fictuld and Heinrich von Ecker und Eckhoffen. I know based simply on the images (https://goo.gl/photos/V8Rjpn59LHXswUjH6) I looked for a translation of Freymäurerische Versammlungsreden der Gold- und Rosenkreutzer des alten Systems for awhile.

I remember I went down this rabbit hole for awhile, twice I think.. for Compass of the Wise and again for Secret Figures. I collected some information on the Asiatic Brethren and knights of.. the light? i think it was.

Unfortunately, there seems to be a wealth of information on these topics... if you read German. There's very little in english.

Florius Frammel
02-07-2019, 08:45 PM
I know based simply on the images I looked for a translation of Freymäurerische Versammlungsreden der Gold- und Rosenkreutzer des alten Systems for awhile.

Thanks Greg, I did not know this one before. Those GuR were a bunch of copycats. But quite amusing somehow:

https://pictures.abebooks.com/1047769/30027645833_5.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/M.Maier._Atalanta_Fugiens._1618._Emblem_XLII.JPG/440px-M.Maier._Atalanta_Fugiens._1618._Emblem_XLII.JPG

vigilance
02-07-2019, 09:21 PM
Where's the second one from? I was sure I recognized the man.. but with a bent knee resting on half a peg-leg. I thought for sure it was from a version of Valentine's Azoth, but that isn't panning out so far.

Any mention in the text of who the lady is? I recognize the "bow".. From Montfaucon's 'L'antiquité expliquée et representée en figures'. The prime suspects:

http://i.imgur.com/XbHMqMR.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/3itscyX.jpg

based on the bared breasts of the reproduction, I'd be leaning towards Ceres, who i'm sure has been used before:

https://i.imgur.com/0wDMmru.jpg

Although according to the Golden Ass they are all the same:


I am she that is the naturall mother of all things, mistresse and governesse of all the Elements, the initiall progeny of worlds, chiefe of powers divine, Queene of heaven! the principall of the Gods celestiall, the light of the goddesses: at my will the planets of the ayre, the wholesome winds of the Seas, and the silences of hell be diposed; my name, my divinity is adored throughout all the world in divers manners, in variable customes and in many names, for the Phrygians call me the mother of the Gods: the Athenians, Minerva: the Cyprians, Venus: the Candians, Diana: the Sicilians Proserpina: the Eleusians, Ceres: some Juno, other Bellona, other Hecate: and principally the Aethiopians which dwell in the Orient, and the Aegyptians which are excellent in all kind of ancient doctrine, and by their proper ceremonies accustome to worship mee, doe call mee Queene Isis.

Florius Frammel
02-07-2019, 09:34 PM
Where's the second one from?

It's from Michael Maier's Atalanta Fugiens.


I was sure I recognized the man.. but with a bent knee resting on half a peg-leg. I thought for sure it was from a version of Valentine's Azoth, but that isn't panning out so far.
I think you might refer/confuse it with the picture to B.V.'s first key:

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/images/ba_key01.jpg




Any mention in the text of who the lady is? I recognize the "bow".. From Montfaucon's 'L'antiquité expliquée et representée en figures'. The prime suspects:

The lady is obviously "nature". And the guys are alchemists trying to follow. A very typical symbol of alchemy. Of course a symbol can't be interpreted in just one single way. So imo your prime suspects count as well (see your last quote by Apuleius(?)).

vigilance
02-07-2019, 09:45 PM
Wow.. that's definitely the peg leg style I was talking about.. But he was walking in a forest, and I remember thinking.. "Is that the "vieillard" (old man) from the text? (Azoth).". But memory can be tricky.

On the typical title page for Azoth though, I see Senior is portrayed with a walking stick/cane too...

vigilance
02-07-2019, 10:08 PM
Okay, the man was in exactly this style from a different version of the first key:

http://i.imgur.com/5A8303I.png

And although I had given up, I found it. I was totally wrong. it was from Maier's Symbola avreae mensae dvodecim nationvm

http://i.imgur.com/1a86FbZ.png


Speaking of copying, I don't think Maier has a single original image. I'm pretty sure they are all taken from Valentine, Book of Lamspring, Rosarium, and maybe a couple of others.

My best version of the images of Valentine's 12 Keys actually come from a Maier re-print of the text. (in Tripus Aureus, i believe)

Florius Frammel
02-08-2019, 05:00 AM
Talking about copying, the Rosarium is quite old, though the printed version is younger. One of the original sources of alchemical pictures are the MS of the "Buch der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit".

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/images/Symbolism_Two_Hermaphrodites_Basle.jpg

A specialty here is, that it shows two hermaphrodites. A good and a bad one. That's quite unique, because one hermaphrodite alone would already allow such a symbolic interpretation. There are more very beautiful pictures, just try to google search.



It's a pre-lutherian work, maybe that's the reason, why it was forgotten/neglected by the protestant surrounding of the GuR. One MS belonged to the chymist Johann Conrad Creiling (an "official" and respected chemist of the 17th/18th century), who was also publishing books on alchemy under a pseudonym.

The Maier pics of Valentine's keys follow a certain interpretation. Even the original B.V. ones were included later and were not presented in the first version. Maier for example later placed the woman more towards saturn, to show it can be putrified as well. Whereas the gold is cleansed with antimony, silver is putrified with lead by means of cupellation. Therefore the king/gold - wolf/stibnite and queen/silver - vulcan/lead connection. At least that's the interpretation of Lawrence Principe. Others disagree, especially the author of "Le clef des douze clefs de B.V.", who definately was an 18/19th century author of the french Cyliani, Fulcanelli lineage.

Trivia: Both Christian Rosenkreuz and Johann Valentin Andreae were lame (like vulcan/saturn) too.

vigilance
02-08-2019, 01:52 PM
Thanks Greg, I did not know this one before. Those GuR were a bunch of copycats. But quite amusing somehow:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/M.Maier._Atalanta_Fugiens._1618._Emblem_XLII.JPG/440px-M.Maier._Atalanta_Fugiens._1618._Emblem_XLII.JPG

I've seen the most recent reply, I just wanted to get your opinion on this first before moving on..

I feel kind of silly asking you about the source when I had just referred to different images from Atalanta...

http://i.imgur.com/y8ZaKS0.jpg

So this brings up a question.. I wonder if this is a callback to Khunrath's owl?? It would depend on how good the translation I have for it is, I'm guessing:

"What good are torches, light or glasses, if people do not want to see."

http://i.imgur.com/ofysgzA.png

vigilance
02-08-2019, 03:14 PM
Talking about copying, the Rosarium is quite old, though the printed version is younger. One of the original sources of alchemical pictures are the MS of the "Buch der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit".

A specialty here is, that it shows two hermaphrodites. A good and a bad one. That's quite unique, because one hermaphrodite alone would already allow such a symbolic interpretation. There are more very beautiful pictures, just try to google search.

Well, you've really opened PANDORA's box with this one. ;) I've been all over the imagery of Buch der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit, from the earliest manuscripts I could find (a few hand written pages) to Reusner's Pandora (and John Micheal Faust's reprint)

http://i.imgur.com/xGTJpCj.jpg

I had been collecting information off and on for years, but (based on file dates, I often don't remember when I've worked on what) it seems I got serious about tracking the changes in the imagery around the end of 2017. I mainly work in a vacuum, as an "island unto myself", and have never had any one/reason to share this. I screenshot this "layer" specifically for the hermaphrodite:

http://i.imgur.com/kuGjzSM.jpg

Comparing how some of the images aren't carried over to later versions:

http://i.imgur.com/yVDjFxj.jpg

and how some of the images in that section of Pandora are products of only the later versions:

http://i.imgur.com/MRyir4r.jpg

I was also curious about the first half of Pandora, the sequence of flask images. (I seem to have started a comparison on those, too). In the publications of Pandora, there's a foreword by Reusner, and then the title Pandora, and between that when the images start appearing, there seems to be no other titles. (remembering I don't read German)

I found it again when I was (randomly) extracting images from Cod. Guelf. 23.19 Aug:

http://i.imgur.com/LV17Kgk.jpg

So referring back to the title page I got my answer:

http://i.imgur.com/kRpJWvs.jpg

And armed with this new information, of course I found all kinds of material on Pretiosissimum Donum Dei. I had information (and an english translation) saved from the old Levity site (now seems to be dead?). They attribute it to George Aurach. That name rings a bell as the presumed author of a collection of texts, De alchimia opuscula complura veterum philosophorum (the title page of which, bringing this back to the beginning, features the hermaphrodite from Dreifaltigkeit.

However, this manuscript (dated vaguely as 14th or 15th century) clearly attributes it to Raymond Lully. And curiously, the text AFTER is attributed to George Aurach:


f. 130–138'. Raymundi Lulli liber intitulatus Pretiosissimum donum Dei, premissa epistola autoris, magistri Raymundi de insula Maioricarum, accurtationis lapidis benedicti. Schlussschrift: Explicit liber qui intitulatur preciosissimum donum Dei sub anno Domini 1500 in octava apostolorum Petri et Pauli.

f. 139–142'. Liber intitulatus (H)ortus divitiarum de secretissima et occulta scientia et arte sacre Chemiae, auctore Georgio Aurach Argentinensi. Schlussschrift: Explicit liber ortus divitiarum intitulatus compositus per Georgium Aurach de Argentina. Scriptus anno Domini 1500 alia die divisionis apostolorum.

Badly translated:


f. 130 - 138 '. Raymund Lull book entitled God's most precious gift , the letter author, teacher Raymond of the island Maioricarum, accurtationis of a john. Schlussschrift, ends the book entitled God's most precious gift in the year of 1500 to the eighth day of St. Peter and Paul.

f. 139 - 142. A book entitled (ii) of riches rise from the most secret and hidden from science and art chemistry, George Aurach Strasbourg. Schlussschrift, ends the match by George Aurach entitled riches rise from Argentina. Written one day in the year of 1500 the division above.

I don't know if this constitutes "original" research on my behalf or not.


It's a pre-lutherian work, maybe that's the reason, why it was forgotten/neglected by the protestant surrounding of the GuR. One MS belonged to the chymist Johann Conrad Creiling (an "official" and respected chemist of the 17th/18th century), who was also publishing books on alchemy under a pseudonym.

The Maier pics of Valentine's keys follow a certain interpretation. Even the original B.V. ones were included later and were not presented in the first version. Maier for example later placed the woman more towards saturn, to show it can be cleansed with antimony (the grey wolf) (or was it lead? JDP would know that for sure) as well. At least that's the interpretation of Lawrence Principe. Others disagree, especially the author of "Le clef des douze clefs de B.V.", who definately was an 18/19th century author of the french Cyliani, Fulcanelli lineage.

There's another name I haven't heard before (Creiling). I have books on Maier I've never read, so I'm being lazy just asking.. Is there any evidence that Maier was ever a "practicing" alchemist?

Florius Frammel
02-08-2019, 04:14 PM
So this brings up a question.. I wonder if this is a callback to Khunrath's owl?? It would depend on how good the translation I have for it is, I'm guessing:

"What good are torches, light or glasses, if people do not want to see."

I have nothing to improve on your translation.

Imo it is quite impossible to tell who was first, or who copied from who. Especially if you compare Kunrath and Maier, who lived during almost the same period of time. If you have eyes to see, there are connections and similarities everywhere. Some belive for example that Jacob Böhme possessed a volume of the "Buch der hl. Dreifaltigkeit" as well, as there are many similarities. On the other hand there are similarities between quietism and Zen-Buddism. With some the connections are more or less obvious, with others you may think it's almost impossible that there exists a connection at all. But the similarities are there. It's a rabbit-hole in itself.



There's another name I haven't heard before (Creiling).

He was a chemistry professor at the university of Tübingen (the "birthplace" of the first(?) R+C (16th/17th century)). As an anonymus he wrote the book "Ehrenrettung der Alchemie" ("Defending the Honor of Alchemy"). Somehow I get more and more the impression that those "chymists" knew more than they revealed openly/officially. The reasons for them doing so would be very intersting imo.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Conrad_Creiling


I have books on Maier I've never read, so I'm being lazy just asking.. Is there any evidence that Maier was ever a "practicing" alchemist?

I guess some would say yes, when they read his texts and look at his images.

To come back to the topic, the Kunrath owl is included in the book "Die 7 heiligen Grundsäulen..", published by Birkholz and from which I published some translation work here recently, as well:

https://books.google.de/books?id=X-ufaeSpvjYC&pg=PA7&dq=die+sieben+heiligen+grunds%C3%A4ulen&hl=de&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjg993wwKzgAhXSwMQBHfZRCQYQ6AEIKDAA#v=on epage&q=was%20helfen%20fackeln&f=false

It's at the introduction of the part called: "Brunnen der Weisheit und Erkenntnis der Natur" by Anonymum von Schwarfuss

"Fountain of Wisdom and Knowledge of Nature" by Anonymous of Blackfoot (must be a native american indian ;) )

vigilance
02-08-2019, 04:27 PM
Others disagree, especially the author of "Le clef des douze clefs de B.V.", who definately was an 18/19th century author of the french Cyliani, Fulcanelli lineage.


Sorry, are you referring to a specific version of 12 keys? My earliest french versions date to 1624? In general I was under the impression that the french translations of Valentine were pretty legitimate.

We spoke of languages.. French is actually something I can handle pretty well. I have a bilingual francophone wife. I have quite a few texts in french that I want to translate eventually.

vigilance
02-08-2019, 04:46 PM
To come back to the topic, the Kunrath owl is included in the book "Die 7 heiligen Grundsäulen..", published by Birkholz and from which I published some translation work here recently, as well:

It's at the introduction of the part called: "Brunnen der Weisheit und Erkenntnis der Natur" by Anonymum von Schwarfuss

"Fountain of Wisdom and Knowledge of Nature" by Anonymous of Blackfoot (must be a native american indian ;) )

There's the AdaMah Booz name again. Have you translated the passage under the owl?

Could I bother you for your opinion of this translation? I used the image in another thread, with just my translation and not the original text. I know that particularly the ending is not very good.

http://i.imgur.com/FCX8vsJ.jpg


'This is to observe that everything that Master/Magician [Artifex] learns or wants to start in this high art. Let the Balance, the right-hand line [right angle, the square in his left hand], and the circle [compass in his right hand] be well observed; so there is nothing unequal, nothing crooked, nothing except the cube, that is, everything is to be brought into one, from one.'

Florius Frammel
02-08-2019, 07:10 PM
There's the AdaMah Booz name again. Have you translated the passage under the owl?


AdaMah Booz = Adam Michael Birkholz

No, I translated this:

http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?5932-Die-7-heiligen-Grunds%E4ulen..



Could I bother you for

Sure. My version:

This is especially to observe, that in everything that the Artifex wants to learn, or begin in this high art, he has to well observe the balance, the proper line and the circle/dividers. That means that there is nothing unequal, nothing crooked, nothing out of the circle. That means that everything out of one thing should be put into one thing, like it is sufficiently shown in this cabalistic figure. And that the highest must simply be put into the meanest and the meanest put into the lowest and therefore linked and connected to each other & e contrà.

Florius Frammel
02-08-2019, 07:15 PM
Sorry, are you referring to a specific version of 12 keys? My earliest french versions date to 1624? In general I was under the impression that the french translations of Valentine were pretty legitimate.

We spoke of languages.. French is actually something I can handle pretty well. I have a bilingual francophone wife. I have quite a few texts in french that I want to translate eventually.

I mean this comment on the 12 keys by a french anonymous:

http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showthread.php?5794-La-Clef-des-douze-Clefs&highlight=Douze+clefs

vigilance
02-08-2019, 08:48 PM
I had checked out the link and understood what part you had posted. I was just hoping. :D



This is especially to observe, that in everything that the Artifex wants to learn, or begin in this high art, he has to well observe the balance, the proper line and the circle/dividers. That means that there is nothing unequal, nothing crooked, nothing out of the circle. That means that everything out of one thing should be put into one thing, like it is sufficiently shown in this cabalistic figure. And that the highest must simply be put into the meanest and the meanest put into the lowest and therefore linked and connected to each other & e contrà.

Thanks for this (and for clarifying the 12 Keys reference), I only have one small follow up question.. Where did the "cube" go in your translation? Or perhaps more appropriately, where did I ever get "cube" from? It's pretty significant in terms of the geometry, but I don't what to be guilty of inserting it where it didn't exist. In terms of twisting it to what I want it to be.

I ask because the image is obviously related to these (specifically the left, but the two are related) (the cube in the second picture has the perfect points of the geometric construction):

http://i.imgur.com/BGT8hz5.jpg

The image i had posted with german text this time is from 'Cabalae Verior Descriptio', attributed to Johann Grasshoff but published in 1761, well after his death. Google Books shows an unviewable entry dated 1680, but according to WorldCat, 1761 is the date. I've seen the image before (without the german text) in Cabala chymica (1606). (some of the information I have saved on Grasshoff attributes Cabala Chymica to him and not Franz Kieser for some reason). Otherwise I have very little information about Cabalae Verior Descriptio. all my searches end up back at the same few sources.

The earlier date pushes it (the picture) back to basically being contemporary with the earliest publications of Valentine's image sequences, so I'd hestitate to say for sure the cabalistic figure is based on the images from Valentine (although I think it is), but they are definitely related. (I also realize publishers often reused existing images in other texts)

(in relation to Materia Prima, I just came across this again today, from the introduction to Michelspacher's Cabala: 'Spiegel Der Kunst und Natur':)


To the reader of this Art

He who reads without understanding
Is like a shadow on the wall.
He who sees a l o t with his eyes,
Yet understands none of it,
Is poorer than the blind man
Who does not see yet understands.
Thus: turn round the mirror,
And you see the whole
Of what there is to be seen in it.
This path will not lead you astray,
For it is as straight as a ruler
And runs through the whole circle.
So you will find the Three standing in the Four
And through the One going into the centre.
And out of the centre will emerge the Three
By virtue of the Four in the circle.
Now you have got a complete mirror,

Florius Frammel
02-08-2019, 09:42 PM
I don't know where you got the cube from. It's certainly not in the text.

The VITRIOL picture was imo first included in a book by Basil Valentine, yes. It was reused quite often. For example in "Hermes Trismegists true and natural path". A link to a free english version of this quite interesting book can be found somewhere in the forum I think.

I found this pic, where the connection of Kaiser and Grasshof is explained. It's spanish, but if you read a little bit french, it should be no problem to understand.

https://www.arsgravis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/caalq.lola5_.jpg

Some say Johann Grasshof was some kind of free-rider of B.V. but is best known (and quite famous) for his two very influential treatises "Der kleine Bauer" (1618) and "Der große Bauer" (later).
At least the kleine Bauer was translated into French as "le petit paysan". An english version can be found here:

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/Text_Allegory_Grasshof.html

I don't know anything about images attributed to him. If you like especially the images in the alchemy books, I can recommend you this book that contains a lot of high quality pictures (but it is in german):

https://www.amazon.de/Alchemie-Königliche-Kunst-Jörg-Völlnagel/dp/3777460710/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?__mk_de_DE=ÅMÅZÕÑ&qid=1549661594&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=jörg+vollnagel&dpPl=1&dpID=613iO0NC6FL&ref=plSrch

vigilance
02-08-2019, 11:06 PM
I don't know where you got the cube from. It's certainly not in the text.

Ug. that's not good. If you are at all interested in Cabalae Verior Descriptio, one of the few sources I found on it is a transcription of the german.. Its up on alchemysite too. (pops on with the first results when googling verior descriptio).


I found this pic, where the connection of Kaiser and Grasshof is explained. It's spanish, but if you read a little bit french, it should be no problem to understand.

That definitely answered my question. I wonder if that means its based on a previous diagram, or Grasshoff's writings were the inspiration.


Some say Johann Grasshof was some kind of free-rider of B.V. but is best known (and quite famous) for his two very influential treatises "Der kleine Bauer" (1618) and "Der große Bauer" (later).
At least the kleine Bauer was translated into French as "le petit paysan". An english version can be found here:

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/Text_Allegory_Grasshof.html

I'm pretty sure this is the first time I've seen anything by Grasshoff translated to english.



I don't know anything about images attributed to him. If you like especially the images in the alchemy books, I can recommend you this book that contains a lot of high quality pictures (but it is in german):

Thats my whole thing though.. When I find something that looks interesting, my next step is to scour the internet finding the best quality digitization I can find, and then I extract the images. If it's really interesting, then I'll try to find a translation, and start googling information about the author and text, and possible other works by the same. It started when I found Manly P Hall's library online, and then I found Jung's, and by now I've developed quite a collection of digitalization project resources..which I have often pillaged by "category" and sorted through later.

If you're interested in Grasshoff, during one of these pillagings I found a manuscript that has Grasshoff listed as the creator. A series of flasks and other images, I've noticed references to Pandora in the text, and theres references to other manuscripts at the end.

https://i.imgur.com/2wsDjMe.jpg

It's Mellon Ms. 50 at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library (https://brbl-dl.library.yale.edu/vufind/Record/3441269)

Kibric
02-09-2019, 06:22 AM
I read recently BV was a publisher called jennis ? or lennis, something
anyone heard this before ?

Florius Frammel
02-09-2019, 07:42 AM
I read recently BV was a publisher called jennis ? or lennis, something
anyone heard this before ?

No. Lucas Jennis was merely (but very influential) a publisher and editor.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucas_Jennis

I have seen it quite often that the Verleger (publisher) was confused with the author.

The Verleger of B.V. was Johann Thölde, who some see as the true author of his work.

https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Thölde

The publisher/author problem occurs quite often in alchemical treatises. It is discussed for example when dealing with the Golden Chain of Homer, Compass of the Wise, I.C.H. treatises and many more.

Kibric
02-09-2019, 10:48 PM
Thanks Florius.
Who do you think BV is ?, i don't believe its Johann Tholde,
the engraver matthaeus merian ?

Florius Frammel
02-10-2019, 06:12 AM
Thanks Florius.
Who do you think BV is ?, i don't believe its Johann Tholde,
the engraver matthaeus merian ?

It's impossible that Matthaeus Merian was BV. Unless he started writing his first book right after his birth. He was born 1593 in Switzerland. The printed(!) version of "Vom großen Stein der Uralten" was published 1599 by Thölde in Eisleben, Germany.

All the people and historians up until the 19th century believed BV was a Benedictine monk of the 15th century who lived before Paracelsus in the monastery of the Peterskirche in Erfurt.

The problem is that no monk with this name can be found in the list of monks of that time. And no MS can be found that predates the first printed book of 1599.

Another problem is, that though his writings are in some cases quite similar to those of Paracelsus, the two men never quote each other. I even read one opinion that BV might have been Paracelsus.

Others tend to believe that his works were a compilation by Thölde and written by him (and/or others).

You asked me what I think who he was. I think it is common practice of Alchemists to not openly tell their name and part of the game. Some have written as anonymouses, others used famous names to cover (and sell). It was on purpose and planned to not find out his real name.

Fulcanelli knew that as well for example and did the same thing even in the 20th century. Or others did it for him. According to one foreword by Canseliet, Fulcanelli saw BV as his master. No wonder he was so fond of the veiling tactics like his big idol.

But I like legends too. Maybe he really was a monk of the 15th century.