PDA

View Full Version : sand



solomon levi
06-21-2009, 01:04 AM
This is a weird connection, but I was thinking about the Gur sand which
comes from putrefying water, and then there's sand on the beach which
occurs where water is or has been, and thirdly, there's sand in one's eyes
after sleeping and also salt water - could this be animal gur? I think it is.

Aleilius
06-21-2009, 08:01 AM
the Gur sand which comes from putrefying water
I think the Gur from putrefying water contains a moderate percentage of diatoms. These are a type of unicellular algae composed of unique silica based cell walls.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatom

There are more than 200 genera of living diatoms, and it is estimated that there are approximately 100,000 extant species.[1][2] Diatoms are a widespread group and can be found in the oceans, in freshwater, in soils and on damp surfaces. Most live pelagically in open water, although some live as surface films at the water-sediment interface (benthic), or even under damp atmospheric conditions. They are especially important in oceans, where they are estimated to contribute up to 45% of the total oceanic primary production.[3] Although usually microscopic, some species of diatoms can reach up to 2 millimetres in length.

...

Diatom cells are contained within a unique silicate (silicic acid) cell wall comprising two separate valves (or shells).

...

Decomposition and decay of diatoms leads to organic and inorganic (in the form of silicates) sediment

...

Living diatoms are often found clinging in great numbers to filamentous algae, or forming gelatinous masses on various submerged plants. Cladophora is frequently covered with Cocconeis, an elliptically shaped diatom; Vaucheria is often covered with small forms. Diatoms are frequently present as a brown, slippery coating on submerged stones and sticks, and may be seen to "stream" with river current.

The surface mud of a pond, ditch, or lagoon will almost always yield some diatoms. They can be made to emerge by filling a jar with water and mud, wrapping it in black paper and letting direct sunlight fall on the surface of the water. Within a day, the diatoms will come to the top in a scum and can be isolated.

Aleilius
06-21-2009, 08:13 AM
there's sand in one's eyes after sleeping and also salt water - could this be animal gur?
I think animal Gur might actually be something like blood cells. If blood is left out for a time, a natural separation will occur. Two layers will begin to form. The upper layer is mostly blood plasma (yellow oil), and the lower layer (a red precipitate) will contain hemoglobin & any other cellular material.

I think this is very similar to the Gur experiments.

solomon levi
06-21-2009, 09:55 AM
Thanks Aleilius.
That's interesting about the diatoms. I didn't think it would actually be
silicate matter, but it is!

That reminds me of something I once heard about humans possibly
meant to evolve into silica based beings instead of carbon based.

Aleilius
06-21-2009, 01:32 PM
That's interesting about the diatoms. I didn't think it would actually be silicate matter, but it is!
I was also surprised when I first learned about them. I'm really amazed by the wonderful geometry some of these diatoms possess!


That reminds me of something I once heard about humans possibly meant to evolve into silica based beings instead of carbon based.
I think this is highly possible. I've heard of silicon based life existing on one of the moons of Jupiter, but I can't remember which moon (Titan, Calisto?). Silicon is right below carbon on the periodic table. So in theory it could work, but the metabolic physics will be all out of wack. These diatoms seem to be carbon based life forms, but somehow they've evolved to use silicon. It should be of no surprise though. These cell walls are very strong compared to carbon based cell walls. It wouldn't surprise me to find these throughout the solar system. Most definitely on mars, and maybe a few moons. These are probably even found on our moon, but you won't hear NASA mention it.

solomon levi
07-03-2009, 07:35 PM
This interesting, from the book "Getting Gold" on genesis of metals
and this particular part with oil of sand (silicate of potash):

"But what about the metals? Whence came the metallic gold of our reefs and drifts? What was it originally--a metal or a metallic salt, and if the latter, what was its nature?--chloride, sulphide, or silicate, one, or all three? I incline to the latter hypothesis. All three are known, and the chemical conditions of the period were favorable for their natural production. Assuming that they did exist, the task of accounting for the mode of occurrence of our auriferous quartz lodes is comparatively simple. Chloride of gold is at present day contained in sea water and in some mineral waters, and would have been likely to be more abundant during the Azoic and early Paleozoic period.

Sulphide of gold would have been produced by the action of sulphuretted hydrogen; hence probably our auriferous pyrites lodes, while silicate of gold might have resulted from a combination of gold chlorides with silicic acid, and thus the frequent presence of gold in quartz is accounted for.

A highly interesting and instructive experiment, showing how gold might be, and probably was, deposited in quartz veins, was carried out by Professor Bischof some years ago. He, having prepared a solution of chloride of gold, added thereto a solution of silicate of potash, whereupon, as he states, the yellow colour of the chloride disappeared, and in half an hour the fluid turned blue, and a gelatinous dark-blue precipitate appeared and adhered to the sides of the vessel. In a few days moss-like forms were seen on the surface of the precipitate, presumably approximating to what we know as dendroidal gold--that is, having the appearance of moss, fern, or twigs. After allowing the precipitate to remain undisturbed under water for a month or two a decomposition took place, and in the silicate of gold specks of metallic gold appeared. From this, the Professor argues, and with good show of reason, that as we know now that the origin of our quartz lodes was the silicates contained in certain rocks, it is probable that a natural silicate of gold may be combined with these silicates. If this can be demonstrated, the reason for the almost universal occurrence of gold in quartz is made clear."


Quartz as the ore of gold could be related to a prima materia.
There's the mention of the quartz vase by Schwaller, and then his acquaintance Fulcanelli often refers us to the oak (Quercus).