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Thread: Where to Begin?

  1. #21
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    My personal (and obviously subjective) suggestion for the aspiring (laboratory) Alchemist is to stay away from the more 'modern' authors.
    I can't speak about all of them, only those I've read and followed (for a short while) - but I would sincerely recommend to especially stay away from Bartlett's books (who are mostly either clueless OR deliberately misleading, especially in the more Advanced Works, but nice for 'tea making', as in simple tinctures) and I also do not recommend the teachings of Albertus - some people still follow his teachings and are still stuck after decades... again, pretty clueless about the Advanced aspects of Alchemy (IMO, of course - everyone should follow what feels right for them).

    There is IMU a quite pronounced difference between common Spagyrics/Plant/Tincture making and High Alchemy, which is an Art of Generation and Accelerated Evolution (as opposed to common extractions and separating/purifying/recombining of what is already available at hand). So maybe it's also a good idea to see for oneself what 'kind' of Alchemist one wishes to be.

    I would also recommend not to hurry before spending time/money/energy on various tools, be they altars, crystals, wall posters and of course glassware.
    The need for some (or all) of these may arise, but I personally think it's better to wait before spending on various tools that may not really be of great use in the relatively near future.
    That's why I'm suggesting (again) to first have a relatively good mental concept of what is to be researched/studied/accomplished, before getting into all sorts of expenses.
    We often realize that we actually needed much less than what we started out with - but then again, maybe there's an important lesson in rendering past tools no longer relevant

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDuncan View Post
    . . . I have a few books, but alot of the stuff in them seems.... off. I am wondering if people have any suggestions for GOOD alchemy books, as well as a small list of equipment i should acquire. . . . I am currently looking for a Suribachi to use. Aside from that what else should i get? . . . . Thank you again for your time in helping a complete newbie.
    In Old Times, the inspiring initiate sought out an initiated alchemist.

    Alchemy is an oral, living tradition. While books can be helpful, it is the experience that holds the key to the nature of this living tradition.

    Quote Originally Posted by JDuncan View Post
    I have Very little intrest in Metals, . . . .
    Humility is the first key.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Androgynus View Post
    ...but I would sincerely recommend to especially stay away from Bartlett's books (who are mostly either clueless OR deliberately misleading, especially in the more Advanced Works, but nice for 'tea making', as in simple tinctures) and I also do not recommend the teachings of Albertus - some people still follow his teachings and are still stuck after decades...
    If I'm not mistaken I believe Bartlett said in his book "Practical Alchemy" that he studied under Albertus, and he [Albertus] was greatly influential in Bartlett's work.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
    If I'm not mistaken I believe Bartlett said in his book "Practical Alchemy" that he studied under Albertus, and he [Albertus] was greatly influential in Bartlett's work.
    Related:

    False Paths (Blog Section)

    Advice on Alchemy Schools & Courses

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Androgynus View Post
    My personal (and obviously subjective) suggestion for the aspiring (laboratory) Alchemist is to stay away from the more 'modern' authors.
    I can't speak about all of them, only those I've read and followed (for a short while) - but I would sincerely recommend to especially stay away from Bartlett's books (who are mostly either clueless OR deliberately misleading, especially in the more Advanced Works, but nice for 'tea making', as in simple tinctures) and I also do not recommend the teachings of Albertus - some people still follow his teachings and are still stuck after decades... again, pretty clueless about the Advanced aspects of Alchemy (IMO, of course - everyone should follow what feels right for them).

    ............l
    Hmmm.... what about the modern author Jean Dubuis (PON)? Is he a useful source?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axismundi000 View Post
    Hmmm.... what about the modern author Jean Dubuis (PON)? Is he a useful source?
    Never got into his materials, so I can't say.

    Quote Originally Posted by Androgynus View Post
    I can't speak about all of them, only those I've read and followed.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
    If I'm not mistaken I believe Bartlett said in his book "Practical Alchemy" that he studied under Albertus, . . .
    What's given on the outside, is not what's established in the inner circles. That is to be true for all egregore and understreams in Initiatory circles.

    Bartlett was probably asked to write book. Didn't want to betray Albertus' Tradition, so hid aspects of the works listed.

    Such things are true today as was in Old Times.

    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
    . . . . and he [Albertus] was greatly influential in Bartlett's work.
    True traditions don't teach to follow. They teach to align with, connect with, your Higher Self (or, whatever synonym one wants to apply).

  8. #28
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    Androgynus ...

    Good points in your longer post, particularly about Higher Alchemy.

    I may be a bit unusual (but complimentary to your point) in my approach based on my history. One thing I'm seeing, both historically and current, is that Alchemy can be followed/utilized as a primary (or initial) path to Enlightenment.

    In my case, I've sought Enlightenment elsewhere, meaning outside the lab, for a number of decades. But having been in the lab at an early age, I'm now cycling back to it to deepen my Experience. I now seek to see how Alchemical laboratory processes may parallel what I have learned elsewhere, in both physical terms and esoterically.

    Elsewhere in the forum I have alluded (<--- finally used correctly) to the fact that Life is a sophisticated amusement park ride. Expanding on that thought, another thing I have said [elsewhere] is that we are born into Ignorance -- a Profound and Sacred Ignorance -- and are challenged to find our way to Enlightenment.

    With my explorations outside the lab I have developed observations about this [sacred, profound] Experience, but now seek to understand the actual, factual, mechanical but Universal Processes of Manifestation that actually occur on the various Planes of Existence I have come to understand (or do not yet understand). And that "Existence" can be outside the five-senses four-dimensional vibrational plane (four-dimensional plane defined as height, width, depth and time).

    The point being that manifestations that may take place in the lab may have parallels to manifestations that are observable through other lenses ... and my use of the word "may" implying that all of this is taking place from my personal point of observation. What may be factual and actual has yet to be observed and experienced by me, personally ... which defines the process as my own Path to Enlightenment.

    This also supports the idea that no two paths are the same, nor can they be. The only thing that can unite them is the "end state" of Enlightenment.

    The Universe "is."

    It's up to each of us, individually, to discover what that "is" is, regardless of how long, painful, tedious, contradictory, convoluted, complimentary or joyful the Journey might be.
    Last edited by DonSweet; 04-10-2014 at 04:27 PM.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSweet View Post
    The Universe "is."
    The Universe simultaneously "is" and "isn't".

    I consider this to be a major (internal, but possibly also externally triggered) realization/revelation concerning the Prime Paradox of Genesis, and important in the Great Work.

    I may/will further expand briefly on this topic, in the short presentation I am currently working on.

  10. #30
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    Oh, I completely agree.

    Could be termed as The Greatest Paradox.

    Or.

    Sacred Duality.

    Or.

    The Eternal Cycle.

    Or.

    The Unity of Opposites.

    Take your pick.
    Last edited by DonSweet; 04-10-2014 at 06:02 PM.

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