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Thread: Copper ORMEs

  1. #1

    Copper ORMEs

    This is a work I attempted about a year ago. I used pure copper powder. This was added to a solution of HCl + H2O2. This was boiled, and copper chloride resulted. This normal copper chloride was then used in the next steps.

    First three pictures show boil-down.








    Water was added to the previous concentrated solution, and then boiled down once more.








    An excess of NaCl was added after the previous boil-down.




    The previous concentrated green solution with salt was then diluted with water, and boiled down once more.






    I stopped taking pictures at this point. After the first boil-down with NaCl the solution was added to a larger flask with more water. I then proceeded to boil it down again, but unfortunately it super-boiled, the contents erupted from the flask, and all my work was lost.

    I've noticed superboiling becomes more and more pronounced with these materials. I've had it happen a number of times, and I've found it to be out of the ordinary.
    Last edited by Aleilius; 02-17-2011 at 12:26 AM.

  2. #2
    Take note of the color change in the last image of the second boil-down with sodium chloride. Notice how it's much different than the color of the first boil-down without salt. There's much more color here!

    Reference these two images:




  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Copper chloride changes color depending on the concentration of the solution. When completely dry, it may be brown colored. When it absorbs a bit moisture becomes green. With more water, blue ciel as your pictures indicate here. About the last to pictures and the diferrence in coloration, what can I say, maybe the excess of chloride ions (due to the existence of sodium chloride) make the copper ions to behave like they are in a concentrated solution and so produce green color.

    About the superboiling problems, yes it is common especially in high concentrated solutions. I use 2-3 pieces of broken glass inside th flask (I dont have boiling stone) they work well.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by theFool View Post
    Copper chloride changes color depending on the concentration of the solution. When completely dry, it may be brown colored. When it absorbs a bit moisture becomes green. With more water, blue ciel as your pictures indicate here. About the last to pictures and the diferrence in coloration, what can I say, maybe the excess of chloride ions (due to the existence of sodium chloride) make the copper ions to behave like they are in a concentrated solution and so produce green color.
    Yeah, that's probably most likely the case. I'm trying to follow a variation of the process listed by Hudson in his ORMEs patent. It seems easy on paper, but in practice it's a bit more difficult.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    What is this used for ? I believe the m-state of copper is green right? Why couldn't you eat it. I heard chlorophyl is m state copper, thats how plants split h2o into h and o, and uses the hydrogen to rise to the sun. Any comments.

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