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Thread: Spiritus Mundi

  1. #1071
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    I could not find the answer on this thread, but maybe it has been answered.

    Which one is the oldest reference to the term "Spiritus Mundi"?

    (Since history has given it different names, I should clarify that I am strictly talking about the expression "Spiritus Mundi", not alternative names).

    Thanks!
    According to the French historian of alchemy, Didier Kahn, the "Spiritus Mundi" concept was introduced into alchemy by Ficino and members of his circle, like the poet Augurelli:

    La doctrine ficinienne du spiritus mundi S'il est bien une innovation dans l'alchimie de la Renaissance qui exerça la plus grande influence, c'est l'identification par Marsile Ficin du «spiritus mundi, véhicule de l'âme du monde, avec la quintessence et l'élixir des alchimistes»...

    En identifiant ainsi l'élixir et la quintessence au spiritus mundi («esprit du monde», «esprit universel»), Ficin ouvrait la voie sans s'en rendre compte à une nouvelle doctrine alchimique promise à un prodigieux succès jusqu'au XVIIIe siècle, non seulement dans le domaine de l'alchimie, mais dans ceux de la médecine et de la philosophie naturelle.


    https://books.google.com/books?id=Hh...0ficin&f=false

    Augurelli se situe en effet dans la mouvance du cercle de Marsile Ficin. Un de ses élèves a été Pietro Bembo. Son poème allie le genre didactique à l'élégance de l'expression, fourmille de réminiscences antiques et, tout en s'appuyant sur un des traités d'alchimie les plus solides du Moyen Age, la Summa perfectionis du pseudo-Geber, il contribue à répandre dans la littérature alchimique le goût de la mythologie classique et y introduit la doctrine du spiritus mundi alchimique avancée par Ficin dans son De vita libri tres (1489), laquelle va exercer dans l'alchimie une influence considérable jusqu'au XVIIIe siècle.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=NB...0ficin&f=false
    Last edited by JDP; 02-26-2018 at 12:26 PM.

  2. #1072
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    Ficino was the one who translated and commented Platos texts first. Newer researches point to him when it comes to the explantion of the origins of the Tarot de Marseille too. The card Le Chariot for example seems to be definately related to a certain passage of Platos Timaios and Ficinos commentary. Boticelli seem to belong to his circle too, as there seem to be similarities of the card "Temperance" and his paintings.

    Ficino can be regarded as the "inventor" of neo-platonism.

  3. #1073
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    According to the French historian of alchemy, Didier Kahn, the "Spiritus Mundi" concept was introduced into alchemy by Ficino and members of his circle, like the poet Augurelli:

    La doctrine ficinienne du spiritus mundi S'il est bien une innovation dans l'alchimie de la Renaissance qui exerça la plus grande influence, c'est l'identification par Marsile Ficin du «spiritus mundi, véhicule de l'âme du monde, avec la quintessence et l'élixir des alchimistes»...

    En identifiant ainsi l'élixir et la quintessence au spiritus mundi («esprit du monde», «esprit universel»), Ficin ouvrait la voie sans s'en rendre compte à une nouvelle doctrine alchimique promise à un prodigieux succès jusqu'au XVIIIe siècle, non seulement dans le domaine de l'alchimie, mais dans ceux de la médecine et de la philosophie naturelle.


    https://books.google.com/books?id=Hh...0ficin&f=false

    Augurelli se situe en effet dans la mouvance du cercle de Marsile Ficin. Un de ses élèves a été Pietro Bembo. Son poème allie le genre didactique à l'élégance de l'expression, fourmille de réminiscences antiques et, tout en s'appuyant sur un des traités d'alchimie les plus solides du Moyen Age, la Summa perfectionis du pseudo-Geber, il contribue à répandre dans la littérature alchimique le goût de la mythologie classique et y introduit la doctrine du spiritus mundi alchimique avancée par Ficin dans son De vita libri tres (1489), laquelle va exercer dans l'alchimie une influence considérable jusqu'au XVIIIe siècle.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=NB...0ficin&f=false
    Thank you, JDP!!!! It is very funny for me that the answer is "Ficino", for he is among my favourite writers and I've read his books many many times. I seems I should re-read his third book of the three books on life. Though, of course, Ficino was not exactly writing about alchemy, but it is interesting. He strictly followed the fourfold division of Plotinus (Hen, Nous, Psyche, Hyle). Since the Book on Life are strongly based on the Timaeus, then my guess is that he was talking about the psuchè kósmou (the third level of Plotinus if we count from "above" to "below").

    I have never read Augurelli, but now I will. Thanks a lot. I simply asked because I like knowing the etymology of the ideas.Thanks a lot, I do not know how to underline the thank you even more.

    I am still curious about which strictly alchemical text "imported" the notion first... but it seems to be this one, by Augurelli https://archive.org/details/ioannisaurelijau00augu (The Chrysopoeia and the Golden Fleece, by Augurelli... which was written in 1515, not 1639 -which seems to be the publication date of the copy they have at archive.org).

    A QUICK glimpse (because my eyes are bringing me troubles due to a conjunctivitis) didn't show me the expression "Spiritus Mundi", but several mentions to a spirit that unites the soul (anima) to the elements and this same spirit can separate them as to work alchemically with the soul itself [That's a very QUICK reading, for my eyes are a mess right now].

    It seems that only a German translation exists. I may translate it to Spanish eventually.

    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    Ficino was the one who translated and commented Platos texts first. Newer researches point to him when it comes to the explantion of the origins of the Tarot de Marseille too. The card Le Chariot for example seems to be definately related to a certain passage of Platos Timaios and Ficinos commentary. Boticelli seem to belong to his circle too, as there seem to be similarities of the card "Temperance" and his paintings.

    Ficino can be regarded as the "inventor" of neo-platonism.
    Somehow yes.
    Gemistus Pletho travelled to the Council of Ferrara/Florence as a secular representative of the Orthodox Church (the council was an attempt to unite the Catholic Church with the Orthodox church, but such thing was not achieved). During his stay, he was hired by Cosimo de Medici to give some seminars on Plato and Aristotle, which strongly favoured Plato. Pletho was confused about the proper dating of some texts, so he assumed that Plato was strongly influenced by Hermes Trismegistus and the Chaldean Oracles (when the truth is exactly the opposite). Cosimo bought a lot of his books and several years later asked Ficino to translate them. Ficino received the whole "combo" and made the same mistake, assuming that Plato was influenced by Hermeticism, but also his ideas were strongly influenced by the first neo-platonism (Plotinus, Porphyry, etc). So he translated Plato, Porphyry, Iamblichus and the "Corpus Hermeticum"., uniting all these sources as "one thing". He also wrote his own books promoting this "new philosophy" and creating the third-wave of neo-platonism (i.e, the first one would be Plotinus, the second would be the medieval neo-platonism, the third one is clearly by Ficino).
    One of his students, Pico della Mirandola went further with a book called 900 Theses in which he was mostly saying that Plato, Hermeticism, Greek Paganism, Qabalah, Christianity, etc were saying EXACTLY the same thing, that God has to be understood by uniting all these sources and it was foolish to reject some of them... thus creating a syncretism that was very influential in Renaissance painting (especially the interchangeability of Christian figures for Pagan figures -i.e, it was typical to understand that Venus and the Virgin Mary were somehow "the same thing"). The ideas of Pico, even more than those of Ficino, were VERY influential for the young Botticelli (though later he got "repented" and the old Botticelli didn't like this influence at al and decided to stick strictly to Christian iconography without mixing it with Pagan iconography).

    The three of them (Pletho, Ficino and Pico are really worth reading)... and JDP added Augurelli, a new find for me. I'm glad that I've asked.

  4. #1074
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    Look, look... somebody replicated Bacstrom's experiment very well. I wonder how did it go?



    Formerly known as True Puffer

  5. #1075
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    If there is two reciever flasks, it is because it operates a separation.

    The heavier spirit will fall in the first and is mostly flegm.

    The subtler, will go at the end of the apparatus. Rich enough in spiritus.

    This path is interesting only if you know what you get... Otherwise you'll mess.

    Also, the fire is too strong. Don't exceed 40°C.
    Salazius

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    "I want to transmute everywhere" ~ The Spirit of Alchemy.

  6. #1076
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    Very interesting, thanks. One needs to try before one suceeds.
    Formerly known as True Puffer

  7. #1077
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    Where they've put the board; while a correct representation of the image; i think the image is implying that the set up is inside the house while the opening is outside exposed to the fresh air. But whatever works right!

    Edit: btw; this is the same.set-up that i intend to use. Hope it works! True Initiate; where did you find this pic?
    Last edited by elixirmixer; 02-27-2018 at 10:37 PM.
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  8. #1078
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    On Andros website.

    https://hermeticvision.com/
    Formerly known as True Puffer

  9. #1079
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    I see in the receiver there’s a fair amount of liquid, or is that an optical illusion?
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  10. #1080
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    No, i think this is genuine homemade Spiritus Mundi.
    Formerly known as True Puffer

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