Patrons of the Sacred Art

Can't log in? Contact Us

OPEN TO REGISTER: Click HERE if you want to join Alchemy Forums!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Results 71 to 77 of 77

Thread: Longevity

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by black View Post
    Hi Tannur



    Did you prepare a spagyric or alchemic preparation of the Lemon Balm ?

    The Carmelites and Paracelsus most probably did.
    Hi black

    No, that is another one of my mistakes. You are right that they probably prepared a tincture or similar. But I have not personally had any problems testing the effect of herbs on the body just by preparing a strong tea.

    A few more things I have noticed about lemon balm:
    -Has a definite joy-promoting effect
    -Purifies the lungs/eases breathing
    -Very calming - mixed it with coffee and it completely blunted the anxiety effect leaving me with a nice, calm focus. But almost too calming on its own I believe. When I first tried it I had it on its own and I wasn't really able to be as productive as usual. This probably isn't helped by its joy-promoting effect. You sort of just want to relax and take it easy if taken on its own, at least in my experience. (I am talking about instant coffee by the way - I am aware that actual coffee itself has a calming effect in the beginning.)
    -Again, no noticeable specific effect on the brain. I am not sure why it earned the title of "Scholar's herb" in the medieval times. Maybe someone else can advise?

    Anyway, so after trying the coffee+balm thing, I have noticed that it is similar to green tea, but much less cooling. Or maybe the less cooling quality is due to the seasons getting warmer - I haven't taken green tea for a while now. Given that I always had a problem with green tea + coffee being too "cold" I am glad to have discovered lemon balm.

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    5
    A facet of longevity that I think it is very useful to understand, esp. in relation to the value of fasting, is the physiological process known as autophagy. A Nobel Prize was awarded in 2016 for research on the subject. A good overview is on the Nobel Prize website.

    https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/me...press-release/

    Since resveratrol was mentioned at the start of the thread, I should add that there is research indicating that resveratrol can be an inducer of autophagy, which may well be one of the main sources of its value for health:

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32012692/

    Regarding fasting, and longevity in general, I think Dr. Valter Longo is an excellent resource:

    https://www.valterlongo.com/

    By "excellent", though, I don't mean "perfect." I think it is possible to eat more protein than he recommends and get better results if the protein is largely plant-based (it's possible he'd agree with that). Also I don't see any way that his recommendations for eating fish are sustainable if everyone in a global population of seven billion plus were to try to follow them, and there are a few more minor problems. Nonetheless I think there are good reasons why he is as widely respected as he is.
    Last edited by Longmen Pai; 3 Weeks Ago at 05:30 PM. Reason: clarification

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    71
    Thanks for the useful info Longmen Pai.

    Just an update regarding my last post: I can confirm the cool aftereffect of lemon balm. Very cool indeed, just like peppermint. I am not the only one who thinks peppermint is hot then cold afterwards (the couple who authored "Hedgerow medicine" agree). I am not surprised given it is in the same herb family, but the fact that peppermint and balm are almost identical is surprising somewhat. For now I can't even tell the difference between the two except the taste (peppermint has that sharp minty flavour and smell whereas balm is softer and has a nice lemony scent to it). Might have to check some herbals regarding the difference but any input from users here would be appreciated!

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Bridger Mountains
    Posts
    2,353
    Blog Entries
    4
    From my experience Mint works more on the liver and blood and digestive system, and Lemon Balm more on the nervous system. I have always known lemon balm to go by the name “Heart’s Delight”.

    I have my interests in the Mint family. Salvia Divinorum is said to be a cross between a Mint species and a Sage species, both classified under Lamiaceae (but this is just a story, as the origin or nativity of S. Divinorum is uncertain).

    Then there is also Thyme, Rosemary, Hyssop, Catnip and other aromatic and medicinal plants in Lamiaceae. Catnip is infamous for the effects it has on cats.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    From my experience Mint works more on the liver and blood and digestive system, and Lemon Balm more on the nervous system. I have always known lemon balm to go by the name “Heart’s Delight”.

    I have my interests in the Mint family. Salvia Divinorum is said to be a cross between a Mint species and a Sage species, both classified under Lamiaceae (but this is just a story, as the origin or nativity of S. Divinorum is uncertain).

    Then there is also Thyme, Rosemary, Hyssop, Catnip and other aromatic and medicinal plants in Lamiaceae. Catnip is infamous for the effects it has on cats.
    Thanks for the information Kioronis.

    One question: How does one tell when a herb is working on their liver or blood?

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Bridger Mountains
    Posts
    2,353
    Blog Entries
    4
    That’s a good question!

    For me it’s about meditating on the plant after ingestion. Trying to follow the taste and flavor of the herb as it moves through the body and perceiving what takes place.

    It’s much easier to experience these things after fasting for 10 hours or so.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    That’s a good question!

    For me it’s about meditating on the plant after ingestion. Trying to follow the taste and flavor of the herb as it moves through the body and perceiving what takes place.

    It’s much easier to experience these things after fasting for 10 hours or so.
    Nice! Do you know of any books which talk about this aspect of Herbalism? (How to test herbs on your own.) I've never really found it discussed in herbal books, then again I haven't read that much. Someone at Inner Garden told me it was traditionally done by fasting (in agreement with your method), going on a very bland diet, then taking a concentrated version of the herb (tincture or strong tea) and observing the effect. Basil Valentine touches on this topic in Triumphal Chariot if I remember correctly.

    Personally I have found another method which I think is useful as it immediately tells one of the practical application of the herb. You simply take it at different times and after different meals etc and observe the effect. E.g. by doing this I found that licorice is very good at maintaining blood sugar levels when you fast or otherwise. Another example is lemon balm: taking it before bed is a sure way to secure good sleep I have found.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts