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Thread: The Celestial Agriculture

  1. #131
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    Another interesting tidbit on limestone:

    "The esoteric substance muppu is clouded in mystery. Literally, it means the “three salts,” i.e., pooneeru, kallupu, and vediyuppu, which correspond respectively to the sun, moon, and fire. Although their exact identification is an issue of much discussion, a reliable source explains that pooneeru is a certain kind of limestone composed of globules that are found underneath Fuller’s Earth. It is collected only on a full-moon night in April, when it is said to bubble out from the limestone, and is then purified with a special herb. Kallupu is hard salt or stone salt, i.e., rock salt, which is dug up from mines under the earth, or is obtained from saline deposits under the sea, or it can be gathered from the froth of sea water, which carries the undersea salt. It is considered to be useful in consolidating mercury and other metals. Finally, Vediyuppu is potassium nitrate, which is cleaned seven times and purified with alum."

    http://www.galathea3.dk/dk/Menu/Fors...Citta+Medicine
    http://serpentrioarquila.blogspot.com/

    "To conjure is nothing else than to observe anything rightly, to know and understand what it is." - Paracelsus

    "Why, then, don't you act when you see the danger of your conditioning? The answer is you don't see... seeing is acting." J. Krishnamurti

  2. #132
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    Some documents which refer to muppu:
    __________________________________________________


    Encyclopaedia of Indian medicine: historical perspective, Volume 1

    http://books.google.com/books?id=TY0...0muppu&f=false
    __________________________________________________

    Recipes for Immortality: Healing, Religion, and Community in South India

    http://books.google.com/books?id=ges...tality&f=false

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195335236
    __________________________________________________

    While tracing the history of this system, we encounter many difficulties in determining the origin or development of this remarkable tradition. The main hurdle in this query is the language, most of the works are in ancient Tamil and very few have ventured to make a critical study. The influence of Siddha system is very strong in South India and it is evident from the Sahasarayoga and other Keralite medical texts. The system accepts thriguna theory, tridosha concept and panchamahabhoota makeup of the physical world. The role of "muppu" is of special interest in this system. This is supposed to be a preparation peculiar to Tamil alchemy in making mercury pills of exceedingly high potency meant indeed to prolong life. Many consider this as an Indian version of the philosopher's stone. It has got a bifold employment.

    - Transmutation of base metals into gold

    - Rejuvenation of the human system

    Tamil literature mentions four kinds of Muppu:

    - Vaidya muppu or the medicinal one

    - Vada muppu - employed in South India alchemy

    - Yoga muppu - meant exclusively for spiritual aspirants

    - Jnana muppu - meant exclusively for spiritual aspirants

    As far as medicinal muppu or vaidhya muppu is concerned, three ingredients go into the preparation of this mixture of sodium carbonate (puniru), rock salt (kaluppu) and calcium carbonate (andakkal). This is obtained from nature. This makes the mercury attains its efficiency and therefore, it is described as "guru". Puniru (or water exuded from earth) is the important one; Muppu is effective in proportion to the quality of this puinru, which is a liquid, whitish in colour, and efflorescence from the soil. This is collected in the early hours of the morning from these places, for it is the result of the action of full moon on earth.

    Like other alchemy systems of the country, Tamil alchemy also works on the male - female (an - pen) principle. Puniru is the union of female and male. The full moon (male) acts on earth (female) at some places in a peculiar way to produce the fluid.
    __________________________________________________

    Muppu: Muppu has a distinct place in Siddha medicine. It is the combination of three rare salts which enhances the efficacy of any Siddha medicine. The preparation and ingredients are a closely guarded secret. It is also believed that ‘muppu’ also engender yogic concentration, a part of Siddha tradition.

    Kaya kalpa: This is similar to ‘Rasayana chikitsa’ of Ayurveda and ‘gerontology’ of modern medicine. The word ‘kalpa’ means ‘able, competent’. When it is connected with ‘kaya’ or body, the term means competency or ability of the body. While in Ayurveda, rasayana is different from ‘vajeekarana’, kaya kalpa does not treat vajeekarana or the science of aphrodisiacs separately. When kayakalpa treatment is undertaken, the vigor of body and mind are restored and so there is no need for separate attention to vajeekarana. Siddhars were more concerned about the ultimate goal of living and less with worldly pursuit of sex. However, kayakalpa is very much capable of achieving the ends of both rasayana and vajeekarana. The details of kayakalpa treatment are:

    1. Preservation of vital energy of the body by diverting the internal secretions to the circulation of blood by control of breathing through yoga
    2. Conservation of sperm by using it for regeneration.
    3. Use of universal salt ‘muppu’ for rejuvenation.
    4. Use of calcined powder prepared from metal and minerals such as mercury, gold,
    sulphur, mica, copper etc.
    5. Use of drugs prepared by certain rare Indian herbs.
    Transmutation of metals into medicinal ‘parpam’ and ‘chendooram’ (ashes) by ‘puta’ and ‘burning’ process

    http://en.netlog.com/suri119/blog

    http://agasthiaherbal.tripod.com/id2.html
    __________________________________________________

    What is Muppu?

    Muppu is the unique discovery of the ancient Siddhas. Muppu is a universal solvent made by the combination of three salts, representative of the 3 elements viz., Water, Air and Fire. It is useful for purposes like rejuvenation, consolidation of mercury into a pill etc. The Siddhas have classified different types of Muppu preparations. This is to say that the constituents of the universal solvents differ depending on the application of Muppu in medicinal preparation, external alchemy and internal alchemy. Fullers earth, Ammonium chloride and salt Petre are considered to be the three constituents of Vaidya Muppu (medicinal Elixir) by some group of healers. Some others feel that the fullers earth itself contains three salts, one having the Shiva Veerya or male energy, Shakthi Veerya or female energy and Shivasakthi Veerya, the combined energy. Muppu, apart from reducing minerals into white or red calcined powders also promotes the potency of the drug multifold. Muppu can also be used alone as a rejuvenative medicine. It keeps one young, strong and free from disease.

    http://www.achalasiddha.com/Faq/faq.htm
    __________________________________________________

    Siddha Kayakarpam

    The hallmark of Siddha system is KAYAKARPAM i.e., imparting immunity to diseases and counteracting the aging process. A deeper exploration in the areas of kayakarpam of the siddhars can fetch us break-through in combating various incurable diseases. Siddha medical science most distinctly emphasizes the practice of Kayakarpam and Kayakalpam to rejuvenate the body and mind, markedly slowing down the biological ageing. The therapy of Kayakarpam is attained through Karpa-aviztham (karpa-medicines) and karpayogam (regimens of life). The longevity of an organism clearly depends on its individual parts and their effective organization. The intercellular organization can be made effective with help of medicines, specially prepared for this purpose like Amuri, muppu etc and practicing special regimens like pranayama, yoga and meditation.

    Amuri, Muppu and Guru are highly acclaimed preparations in Tamil Siddha tradition. It is mentioned in the literature that without these, the preparation of any medicine, the efficacy of any drug or the accomplishment of Kaya Karpam is incomplete. Even amongst these three, Amuri is primordial in the preparation of Muppu itself. It is considered as a very basic drug. Because of its importance, Siddhars in their literature have used various synonyms in cryptic poetic language. In Kandar Nadi Vakiyam, an unpublished nadi literature, a reference is found that a specially prepared plantain juice (pj) is Amuri.

    Amuri is used i) during treatment (Vaidya Amuri) ii) as a base for processing metals/minerals (Vada Amuri) iii) to facilitate salvation (Gnana Amuri) iv) to rejuvenate and prolong life (Karpa Amuri).

    http://drjaiprakash.wordpress.com/20...ha-kayakarpam/

    http://en.netlog.com/go/out/url=http...bal.tripod.com

    http://www.siddhacure.com/

    [reference to muppu on perhaps the 12th page turn or so.]

    __________________________________________________

    Siddha medicine in Tamil Nadu

    http://www.natmus.dk/graphics/TRANKE...04,%202008.pdf

    The esoteric substance called muppu is particular to Siddha medicine and may be considered as Siddha’s equivalent of the "philosopher’s stone." Its preparation is hidden in secrecy, known only by the guru and taught only when the student is deemed qualified to accept it. It is generally thought to consist of three salts (mu-uppu) called puniru, kallupu, and vediyuppu, which correspond respectively to the sun, moon, and fire. Puniru is said to be a certain kind of limestone composed of globules that are found underneath a type of clay called Fuller’s Earth. It is collected only on the full-moon night in April, when it is said to bubble out from the limestone, and is then purified with the use of a special herb. Kallupu is hard salt or stone salt, i.e., rock salt, which is dug up from mines under the earth; or is obtained from saline deposits under the sea, or it can be gathered from the froth of sea water, which carries the undersea saline. It is considered to be useful in the consolidation of mercury and other metals. Finally, vediyuppu is potassium nitrate, which is cleaned seven times and purified with alum.

    This religio-medical form of therapy is the cornerstone of the Siddha medical practice and provides the basis for the rich variety of alchemical preparations that make up the pharmacopoeia of Siddha medicine…
    __________________________________________________

    Without entering into the details we may say that in Tamil Siddha literature we come across three methods by which the human body can be transmuted into immortality. First, there is the method of alchemic process (containing Siddha medicine) which, instead of being performed in the laboratory, takes place in the body and consciousness of the sadhaka. In Bogar 700, we find a reference to the method of preparation of the greatest of medicines -muppu-by advocating which, the body will turn into divya deha, an immortal golden body. The second is the method of kundalini yoga, which is the method adopted by all Tamil Siddhas. A third method that is suggested is what is called ulta sadhana "contrary practice" which states that the sex sentiment properly cultivated may lead man back to the very heart of reality. When sex energy is sublimated and transmuted the yogin rises aove the sense of identity with the physical body. This state is technically called urdhareta. Agastiyar Jnanam, Bogar's poems and Tirumantiram speak of the third process and assure us that there is no death for a man who adopts it perfectly. Following the footsteps of Bogar, this technique is taught, of converting sex energy into spiritual energy in the Kriya Yoga centers around the world. The way to overcome physical evil is to accept the Siddha doctrine of body. For, in acceptance there is transcendence.

    http://www.babajiskriyayoga.net/engl...-project-3.htm
    __________________________________________________

    Worth his Salt - and More

    Muthusamy, now 70, was just four when he was taught the Tamil alphabet by the traditional method of drawing them on sand. His teacher happened to be a siddha practitioner, who had a keen interest in plants. In one of the classes, the teacher had instructed the children to show love for lepers as Mahatma Gandhi had shown in his time. This instruction unsettled the young Muthusamy. He asked his teacher why could not leprosy be cured altogether and all humankind be loved instead? The teacher took this in his stride and replied that indeed nature had a cure and this was recorded in the ancient siddha texts.

    Muthusamy studied up to the fourth standard. Some time later, at the age of 13, he took the decision to leave home and move in the company of sages in the Himalayas. This experience exposed him to siddha literature in which he soon developed a profound interest. Soon he was decoding siddha scripts, which were written on palm leaves. To this day, his associates and contemporaries in the study of siddha have no qualms about handing over siddha palm
    scripts to him for the purpose of decoding.

    While he was working on decoding the scripts, he chanced upon a couplet from the holy book of the Yogagnana Thirattu that had relevance to the cure of leprosy. The couplet mentioned three salts that, it said, were useful in the formulation of a cure for leprosy. Muthusamy himself came to know that these salts could be collected from the earth and purified.

    Halts for Salts

    Once he had returned from his journey with the sages, he started out on a hunt to find the salts in Tamil Nadu. He naturally came across and identified a number of salts before he could narrow down his find to the three particular salts that were referred to in the Yogagnana Thirattu. The six salts that his efforts helped him find were: savuttuppu (sodium carbonate), sara-uppu (silicon nitrate), boom Nathan (calcium sulphate), pooneer (ammonium carbonate), antakkal (calcium carbonate) and attuppu (sodium chloride).

    His venture took him to a variety of places where he interacted with several communities. One such community consisted of washermen and washerwomen who used a particular kind of salt for the purpose of cleaning clothes. However, it was another commonly found salt, savattuppu, which the community was not making use of, that Muthusamy found useful for the purpose of finding a cure for leprosy. Two other communities that he came in touch with were those of the pottili naickers and the uppili naickers. In Tamil, uppu means salt and potilli refers to a loud sound usually made during festive occasions (the people of these communities use sara-uppu, which is collected from sand, to produce such a sound). After spending some time with them, he learnt the art of collecting this salt from sand. While on his quest for the salts, once the behaviour of birds led him to another salt. He observed several pigeons flocking to an open ground just before dawn to peck at something from the ground. He initially contended that they were feeding on grains of food, but he found their timing intriguing and decided to take a closer look at the object of their interest. On inspection he found that they were not feeding on grains but on the granules of a kind of salt. He later found that this salt provided the birds with the energy for long flights. He collected this salt, which was available only in the month of February, and identified it as boominathan. On another occasion he found the grazing animals of a certain area licking a kind of rock that grew out of the earth. On closer inspection, he found it to be attuppu.

    Another salt he found covered with short grass – pooneer. Once he came across stones that could easily catch anyone’s attention: they rattled! This happened because the outer layer of these stones hardened faster than the inner layer. These stones contained antakkal.

    Starting with basic experimentation, he found the first salt pungent, the second bitter and the third sour to the taste. When mixed with turmeric, the first two salts turned red while the colour of the third one remained unchanged. He discarded three salts out of the six: he found that savattuppu could be extracted from pooneer, antakkal could be extracted from sara-uppu and boom Nathan could be extracted from attuppu. He also learnt the art of using chloride, nitrate and sulphate ions to add potency to his herbal preparations used in the treatment of leprosy. He called the salts siva, sakthi and nandhi, which perhaps are the equivalent of proton, electron and neutron in an atom; in the language of siddha, they are pooram, veeram and thurisu.

    He also found that each salt lost its properties on being heated. He struggled for years to standardise a protocol for an ideal combination of these three salts. Finally he managed to develop the trine salt called muppu, meaning the absolute, without impacting the characteristics of the individual salts. This meant a holistic combination of siva, sakthi and nandhi. In
    siddha belief the concept of muppu is nothing but an understanding of the atom and the universe.
    __________________________________________________

    The Siddha quest for immortality

    http://indianmedicine.eldoc.ub.rug.n...lItemRecord=ON
    __________________________________________________

    A study of Siddha Vaidya Muppu

    http://indianmedicine.eldoc.ub.rug.n...lItemRecord=ON
    __________________________________________________
    Last edited by Albion; 01-14-2012 at 04:34 PM.

  3. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by solomon levi View Post
    It is collected only on a full-moon night in April, when it is said to bubble out from the limestone, and is then purified with a special herb.
    RogerC (and other followers of Fulcanelli) will go crazy over this one!

  4. #134
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    Thank you Albion. That's an amazing presentation.
    http://serpentrioarquila.blogspot.com/

    "To conjure is nothing else than to observe anything rightly, to know and understand what it is." - Paracelsus

    "Why, then, don't you act when you see the danger of your conditioning? The answer is you don't see... seeing is acting." J. Krishnamurti

  5. #135
    The esoteric substance called muppu is particular to Siddha medicine and may be considered as Siddha’s equivalent of the "philosopher’s stone." Its preparation is hidden in secrecy, known only by the guru and taught only when the student is deemed qualified to accept it. It is generally thought to consist of three salts (mu-uppu) called puniru, kallupu, and vediyuppu, which correspond respectively to the sun, moon, and fire. Puniru is said to be a certain kind of limestone composed of globules that are found underneath a type of clay called Fuller’s Earth. It is collected only on the full-moon night in April, when it is said to bubble out from the limestone, and is then purified with the use of a special herb. Kallupu is hard salt or stone salt, i.e., rock salt, which is dug up from mines under the earth; or is obtained from saline deposits under the sea, or it can be gathered from the froth of sea water, which carries the undersea saline. It is considered to be useful in the consolidation of mercury and other metals. Finally, vediyuppu is potassium nitrate, which is cleaned seven times and purified with alum.
    Fullers earth, Ammonium chloride and salt Petre are considered to be the three constituents of Vaidya Muppu (medicinal Elixir) by some group of healers. Some others feel that the fullers earth itself contains three salts, one having the Shiva Veerya or male energy, Shakthi Veerya or female energy and Shivasakthi Veerya, the combined energy. Muppu, apart from reducing minerals into white or red calcined powders also promotes the potency of the drug multifold. Muppu can also be used alone as a rejuvenative medicine. It keeps one young, strong and free from disease.
    Thanks for this Albion.....its nice to receive confirmation of this path in other culture's alchemical systems....especially mention once again of the three salts mentioned by Cyliani, Recreations Hermetiques and others and the collection of the froth of the moon in limestone. The whole thing fits rather well here, thank you for the contribution and research and thanks for the initial find and posting it Solomon.....it gives us more to look into.

  6. #136
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    Excerpts from: Recipes for Immortality by Richard S. Weiss

    http://www.amazon.com/Recipes-Immort...6590634&sr=8-1
    ____________________________________________


    The earliest available accounts of the origins of siddha medicine are found in texts long preserved on palm-leaf manuscripts, many of which are available today in cheap, printed editions. Agastya, the most prolific of the medical siddhars, describes the foundations of his teaching on the rejuvenative medicine muppu in his 100 Verses on the Regenerative Compound Muppu:

    Daily I did puja to the feet of Shakti, and I placed myself at the feet of Shiva, adorned with the crescent moon, before I proclaimed the method to prepare muppu. 35

    I sang many great texts, oh noble one. I gathered the appropriate parts on kaŸpam that were in those myriad texts, and I put them in this one without technical language ( paripāùai ) for the survival of the people of the world. . . . 36

    Holding the feet of Shakti in my mind, I saw the method to prepare muppu which is the means to immortality. While on the densely forested Potigai Mountain, many great siddhars came, ate kaŸpam, and asked me about this unique herb used to calcinate all types of minerals. I taught them, summarizing the chemical process. . . . I taught the method for preparing muppu. . . . No one else in the four directions knows this method. I will sing this openly to you. If you understand this correctly, you too will become a rishi-siddhar! I will tell you now about the wondrous muppu which is used to make centūram and paŸpa . 37

    Notice that I have condensed this knowledge in one hundred verses. Manonmani [Shakti] taught it to me, and I taught it in this text exactly like she did, without errors, for the benefit of the people of the Earth. 38
    _____________________________________________

    The characterization of the siddhars as investigating the natural world, doing their research in a considered way, and gaining knowledge through careful measurement, stands out as more specifically modern when we compare these twentieth century writings with premodern medical texts. In these texts, and similarly in the Tirumantiram , the siddhars are great devotees who gain their powers and their medical knowledge not through personal insight into the nature of things but through their devotion to Shiva and Shakti. Th us Bhogar, one of the most popular of the medical siddhars, writes of a devotee of Shakti: “Because he did puja and recited the mantra ‘Om,’ worshiping Shakti’s feet, he achieved extraordinary power ( citti , Sanskrit siddhi ). . . . He made a pill for bodily immortality ( kāyaccittam ).”

    Similarly, the text I quoted earlier states that Agastya gained knowledge of muppu through devotion. “Holding the feet of Shakti in my mind, I saw the method to prepare muppu which is the means to immortality.” The premodern texts do not hold that the siddhars discerned medical formulae through careful explorations of the natural world, but that they received this knowledge as a reward for their extraordinary devotion.

    Furthermore, according to these older texts, the siddhars’ extraordinary medicines were oft en the cause of their great powers, not the fruit of their insight into the natural world. In a text on “subtle muppu” ( cūñca muppu ), Agastya speaks of a medicine called vañcinˉ i , prepared by combining mercury, a salt called ām , and copper sulfate. On eating this, one can run all the way past the peak of the mythical Mount Meru and will even see the siddhars, and will there have the opportunity to serve them! As Agastya points out in another of his texts on muppu, “If you understand this [formula for muppu] correctly, you too will become a rishi-siddhar!” Another siddhar, Kailasa Sattamuni, holds that simply eating a plant called ceruppañai will put one in a deep meditative state of camāti (Sanskrit samādhi ), the highest goal of yoga. Rather than Tamil intuition or research penetrating the secrets of the physical cosmos, premodern medical texts posit that material nature itself, in the form of a mere creeper, stimulates the highest possibilities of human achievement.
    _____________________________________________

    The view voiced by many vaidyas that the siddhars initiated a rationalization of South Asian religion is unsustainable. The writings of the .ānˉasiddhars substitute for one hidden quantity, the material effi cacy of ritual and symbolic constructions, others such as the potential to gain knowledge through extraordinary means. Medical texts attributed to the siddhars do not criticize rituals oft en linked to brahmanic temple practices, such as puja or archana. For example, Uromarishi, in his Muppu Sutra 30 (Text on muppu in thirty verses) warns the vaidya not to forget to do puja in conjunction with formulating medicine. Although many vaidyas today reject this employment of ritual in formulating medicine, they continue to emphasize that the siddhars, and by extension their medicine, have a direct relationship to divinity. A pamphlet entitled “The Principles of Siddha Medicine” traces the “treasure” of the siddhars’ knowledge to their internal realization of divinity.

    With the sixth sense, siddhars have been successful in their attempts to attain the power which animates the world. . . Through their learning and experience, the siddhars have mastered great knowledge. So that ordinary people can obtain the permanent bliss that they achieved, they described in songs the way to acquire that power. All their verses are the invaluable treasure of the holy Tamil land ( tami×ttirunāñu ). The special characteristic of siddhars is that they have attained the divine state of permanent bliss. Realizing this divine state within themselves, the siddhars transcend institutional religion ( camayam ) and ritual.

    This transcendence is made possible by the dismissal of the physical technologies of worship, by the location of divinity within each individual self, and by the assertion that the method to acquire “great bliss” and the “power that moves the world” does not require “institutional religion” that involves the mediation of brahmans but is contained in the verses of the siddhars. Unlike much temple ritual performed in Sanskrit, the siddhars’ verses are in Tamil, the colloquial language of rickshaw drivers, street vendors, and other ordinary people who compose the primary audience
    of this rhetoric.
    ______________________________________________

    A look at some premodern Tamil medical texts sheds light on some of the meanings of secrecy in precolonial times. Here, the lines of secrecy were drawn in at least two different ways. One was drawn between types of beings, on one side the ordinary people of the world and on the other the extraordinary siddhars, the knowers, who concealed their knowledge from common people. Another line is that between hereditary medical lineages, which kept their knowledge secret from
    one another. Th e text Akastiya Munˉivar Aruëiya KaŸpa Muppu Kuru Nūl 100 (Agastya’s 100 verses on the regenerative compound muppu) narrates a typical story of Agastya’s initial redaction of medical knowledge in textual form, a redaction that other siddhars strongly resisted.

    I say this in clear language to all of the wise people of the world. This text is without equal among such texts. I collected information from many texts and recorded it in this one. If this text is not available to scholars, I previously gave a text called “205 verses,” which is the first text in healing and is the same as this one. . . . Knowing this, the siddhars, who were in a mountain cave, took this text and hid it in that cave. I called the siddhars who had hid it and I retrieved the text, telling them it is for the good people of the world. If those who know this clear text on muppu don’t reveal it to people who revile the guru, then they will become knowledgeable with the grace of the undivided Shiva-Shakti.

    I have given the complete formula of the restorative medicine ( kaŸpam ) which gives yogic powers ( citti ).

    The author of this text portrays the siddhars as a whole as selfishly protecting the knowledge that separates them from ordinary people. It is the acquisition of the yogic powers, the cittis, which distinguishes the siddhars. The correct preparation and consumption of muppu will make an ordinary person a siddhar: “No one in the four directions knows this method to prepare muppu. I will sing this openly to you. If you understand it with skill, you too will become a rishi-siddhar!” The siddhars, to protect their preeminence, do not wish ordinary people to have this knowledge, so they hide Agastya’s text.

    What are these other texts that Agastya collected? They are his own works, general medical texts that were not specifi cally on muppu, the most potent of kaŸpam or rejuvenative medicines. This work of 100 verses is thus a compilation of prior texts attributed to Agastya, indicating that it is more recent than other texts ascribed to the siddhars. “I sang many great texts, noble one. I gathered the appropriate parts on kaŸpam that were in those texts, and I put them in this text without technical language ( paripāùai ) for the immortal survival of the people of the world.”

    Agastya repeatedly contrasts his own openness and generosity to the jealousy of the other siddhars. In claiming that his text is free of paripāùai, he contends that his text is superior to other texts, whose meaning is obscured by paripāùai and which therefore cannot be properly understood. Indeed, Agastya claims to have facilitated the work of vaidyas who seek to manufacture muppu by assembling all the information about In narrating the attempt of other siddhars to hide this clear, direct text outlining the recipe of muppu, the author suggests the superiority of all knowledge attributed to Agastya.

    Accordingly, the other siddhars cannot be trusted because they do not want ordinary people to become siddhars—this is why they tried to hide Agastya’s text, and why they wrote their own texts in paripāùai. Paripāùai is generally attributed to the texts of other siddhars, not one’s own. Agastya claims, “I have not hidden the formula of muppu, but the other siddhars have hidden it in tens of millions of texts.” Other siddhars have hidden their knowledge so effectively that no one will be able to decipher the formula. The implication is that even if another lineage has a text on muppu, they will not understand it because it is riddled with impenetrable paripāùai. Agastya holds that “I have revealed fully all kinds of medicines. Those who have not studied this text don’t know what medicine is, or what kaŸpam is, but they speak as if they know. Those good people who know the meaning of this text will prepare the proper kaŸpam.
    ____________________________________________

    As we have seen, the siddhars generally celebrate their texts as being clear, without the paripāùai that obscures the texts of other siddhars. However, for the siddha vaidya today who tries to formulate the most powerful medicines, either rejuvenative or alchemical, none of the premodern texts seems clear. In his preface to his collection of Agastya’s texts on muppu (which as we have seen were themselves compilations of prior texts), S. P. Ramachandran speaks of the difficulty in understanding Agastya’s writings, and also of the great promise these writings possess.

    One of the reasons that the siddhars used technical language ( paripāùai ) is so that others could not understand, as each siddhar used his own coded words. It is also because of this that siddha medicine cannot be produced correctly by those who are not appropriate, and why it cannot be employed correctly, why there is confusion among people.

    However, we are astonished when we hear of the miraculous work that has been accomplished by a few siddha vaidyas. An amount of medicine equal to a grain of rice can cure leprosy. It can change wrinkles and gray hair, restore youthfulness, and liberate from the grip of death. All of this is not fantasy. We know that these things have truly occurred.

    According to vaidyas today who try to interpret the writings of the siddhars, paripāùai is the key that controls access to esoteric medical knowledge. In principle, only those who have the proper training, that is, those who have studied under a guru, will know the exact referents of paripāùai, assuming that each coded term has a precise and single correspondence to a specific substance. Ramachandran admits that the siddhars were so effective in their use of paripāùai that they have created much confusion. Yet he also affirms that “we” (the emphatic, inclusive nāmē ) hear of the miracles worked by some siddha vaidyas, joining himself and his audience in the conspiracy of being part of something beyond explanation. It is this sort of testimony of that sustains the hopes of siddha vaidyas that their medical premises and texts may one day bring them fame and fortune.

    There is oft en an assumption among vaidyas that that at some time in the past, the meanings of paripāùai were clearly known but have been lost with the passage of time. A formula given in a text, no matter how poorly understood at present, is material evidence for a fantastic medicine that has been formulated in the past and that might, perhaps, be produced in the future. Although it is impossible to demonstrate (and it is just this very impossibility that makes these claims of the miraculous appear feasible), I argue that much, but not all, paripāùai of the medical texts has never been known to anyone; that is, it has always been language that has no referent. If this is true, the secret has always been that which Agastya warned us with respect to other paramparais: that there is no secret, and that there are no miraculous medicines. The power of paripāùai, then, has never been that of concealing true medical formulae, but of concealing the fact that there are no true medical formulae, inserting an obstacle between the vaidyas’ comprehension and illusory substances that will produce gold out of mercury or cure all ills. The formulation of this illusory medicine, and all the wealth that it will bring, appear to be within the grasp of the vaidya if only the paripāùai can be deciphered. Paripāùai effects the proximity of the miraculous, tempting belief that it is only the proper interpretation of a single word that stands between ordinary vaidyas and extraordinary medicine.

    While obscure language makes comprehension impossible, and therefore appears to be the impediment to its formulation, it is the very same paripāùai which enables vaidyas to imagine that the recipe given in the text that they have in their hands, if understood properly, will indeed produce medicines of almost limitless potency.

    As an example of the use of paripāùai and its power to impart credence to the extraordinary, I will focus on the preparation called muppu. Muppu literally means “three salts.” B. V. Subbarayappa holds these three to be “ pūnīŸu (possibly a mixture of carbonates), kalluppu (rock salt) and aõñakkal (probably calcium carbonate).”

    He also notes that muppu is absent in Sanskrit alchemical texts, and most vaidyas I spoke with specified muppu as a distinguishing characteristic of siddha medicine.

    Kundrathur Ramamurthy spoke of an “original” muppu which could be used to transform copper into gold. The at same original muppu could be mixed with medicine to increase its potency, and when ingested, it rejuvenates the body and makes hair grow. He was skeptical that any vaidyas today are able to produce this original muppu, however. G. J. Parthasarathy spoke of alchemical ( vāta ) muppu and medical ( vaittiya ) muppu, but he did not discuss it further because he had been sworn to secrecy by a guru who taught him about it. Subbarayappa distinguishes four kinds of muppu: alchemical, medical, yoga, and wisdom ( ñānˉ a ). Vaidyas generally consider muppu to combine medical and alchemical qualities, so the same substance that will turn base metals into gold will also impart youth, strength, and vigor to the body.

    Muppu, all siddha vaidyas know, will cure all ills and bestow immortality, and so it is probably the most sought after of all medicines. Because it is shrouded in secrecy, however, its successful formulation is elusive. In the May 1972 issue of the medical periodical Nandhi, Dr. Venugopal writes, “In speaking of muppu, it will be a matter that ordinary people should not elaborate upon. It is a thing that one cannot easily grasp. . . . The siddhars have explained the elucidation of muppu in pāripāùai. . . . Thus, siddha practitioners have received the explanation either as a verbal account from generation to generation or by their individual tinkering fully in the path of the siddhars, and the situation is such that other people cannot understand it fully.” The formula for the preparation of muppu is a curious sort of secret, in that it is not clear that anyone today knows it.

    M. Shanmukavelu, a siddha practitioner attempting to formulate muppu based on Agastya’s texts, frustrated with his lack of success, disputes Agastya’s proclamation that he has openly revealed the formula for muppu against the wishes of the other siddhars. “Purposely he [Agastya] concealed these important points on muppu because he was afraid that his colleagues or co-Siddhas would fi nd fault with him or accuse him and get angry.” Andiappa Pillai, in an article written in connection with the World Tamil Conference held in 1983, concurs. “The Siddhars are unanimous in concealing the details of manufacture of the magic drug Muppu. Even those Siddhars who loudly proclaim that they would narrate everything about Muppu ultimately do not say anything significant about it.”

    The major difficulty in producing muppu is confusion around the substance called pūnīŸu, or “earth water.” M. Shanmukavelu calls it “the first ingredient of muppu,” and most texts on muppu mention it as a key ingredient. In Agastiyar Cūñca Muppu 32 (Agastya’s 32 verses on subtle muppu), we find the following description of pūnīŸu:

    Listen to the details of pūnīŸu. It sprouts above ground, and is very concentrated like lime. Don’t touch it with your hand, as the hand will become blistered. (15)

    Gather it with a margosa leaf and put it in a container. Go only to the place called Pōm. Th ere the stuff called ām [probably pūnīŸu] was graciously available to us there on a full-moon night, hanging densely in clusters, just as the love of Parvati hangs densely in clusters. Listen to the details of pūnīŸu which is called pūm. Oh pure one, I’ll tell you this for your [immortal] survival! (16)

    If one asks what are the names that others have used for pūnīŸu: curuïkānˉ a ravipījam [the condensed seed of the sun], pūnākam, pūminātam, civanˉ uppu, veõõīr, . . . [gives ten more names]. I only know these words, not the endless tens of millions of others. Oh, they have sung countless names! (17–18)

    These are the only details that Agastya gives as to how to locate pūnīŸu, before he moves on to describe its proper preparation, that is, it must be dissolved in pure water, and so on. The most specific reference is a place called Pōm, a place with no clear geographic reference.

    In his dictionary of the Tamil sciences, T. V. Sambasivam Pillai writes about pūnīŸu: “Efflorescence grows in clusters and bursts out into flower at new moon or full moon nights during dew seasons . . . on the soil of fuller’s earth. When the sun rises it turns to fine powder.” B. V. Subbarayappa calls it “a natural exudate from the soil which has Fuller’s earth. . . . It has a composition similar to that of Fuller’s earth (over 50% of silica, 13% of aluminum oxide, about 10% of iron (ferric) oxide, 5% of calcium oxide, 2% magnesium oxide, less than 2% of alkalis, and 18% of water).” Subbarayappa also notes that it is collected “ritualistically in certain places of Tamil Nadu by Siddha practitioners, specially on four full-moon nights in the months of Jan–April. . . . According to some Siddha practitioners who collect it, they should offer worship to the soil from which it emanates.”

    Elsewhere, Subbarayappa describes “tradition” as holding that there are thirty-five places in south India where pūnīŸu grows, and that it is formed when the rays of the moon, considered to be male, shine on particular types of soil, considered to be female, which then “gives birth” to the pūnīŸu. 44 M. Shanmugavelu writes, “There is a peculiar and seasonal influence between the Earth and Moon for the formation of Puneer [ pūnīŸu ] in certain selected areas fit for its growth. Puneer crops up ten days aft er New Moon (Amavaseii) or about the time of Paurnami (i.e., Full Moon). It crops up early in the morning and loses its life aft er sun-rise.” 4However, the author admits that it is difficult for ordinary people to fi nd pūnīŸu, that “we invariably fail to secure first rate puneer.” Such high-quality pūnīŸu can only be acquired by “Yogis and Sadhus.”

    Shanmukavelu concludes, “I must frankly admit that the success of muppu depends largely upon what quality of puneer we get,” a pessimistic estimation given the elusiveness of pūnīŸu. The conditions in which pūnīŸu might be acquired are numerous and ephemeral. The physical location is uncertain, but it is clear that pūnīŸu will only grow in a particular type of soil. The time is very specific, just between dawn and sunrise.

    Its appearance is of a somewhat extraordinary crystallization on the earth. Furthermore, there are hundreds of different names given for pūnīŸu in the premodern texts. The problem is both too little information and too much. If one searches the corpus of available siddhar texts and catalogues for the qualities of pūnīŸu in all its names, the list would be extremely long and certainly contradictory, effectively nullifying the possibility of gleaning precise knowledge. Here we find continuity between premodern and modern Tamil medical discourse, in that both posit the extraordinary just beyond the limits of knowledge and accessibility, whether on ancient island called Lemuria or in a unknown place called Pōm.

    This recognition of the difficulty of producing muppu, and the lack of any clear exposition of its manufacture, does not prevent many vaidyas from attempting to formulate it. In my interview with him in 2007, Kundrathur Ramamurthy, practicing on the outskirts of Chennai, blamed his failed efforts to produce muppu on the lack of sharing of knowledge among practitioners today. “I’ve put a lot of effort into preparing muppu. The problem is, those who have made it don’t show us.

    They keep it inside and we can’t do anything. Those who have done it should show us. If not, there’s no way to know. It’s a diffi cult process.” In his February 9, 1991, speech at a meeting of the Kerala Siddha Sangam, Dr. Edison spoke of the necessity of manufacturing muppu powder ( muppu cuõõam ), announcing: “I have planned a scheme for our preparing muppu cuõõam in our ashram. If everyone will share, we can prepare the muppu cuõõam required.” The potential that muppu might be prepared, and the promise off ered by its successful completion, overshadow the reality of failed attempts at production. Devasahayam, a siddha vaidya who runs a medical shop, states: “We have not prepared muppu. But we are not without the thought of doing preparation of muppu. Yes, we have made some attempts to prepare it. . . . If there is muppu, it is said that people will be without even gray hair and wrinkles. There will be no gray hair and wrinkles. No cancer. Now the AIDS which is here, they say that if there is muppu, treatment can be given to all.”

    Although no one seems to know how to make muppu, everyone knows what it can do. The absence of muppu, and the elusiveness of a precise recipe for its formulation, is balanced by its overwhelming presence in siddha medical discourse, and by a clear sense of all that it will offer.

    ___________________________________________

    Whereas the obscurity of paripāùai provides siddha vaidyas with the fantasy of extraordinary power, it is simply a frustrating and irrational aspect of traditional medicine to those who seek to unify disparate practices into a single system.

    Srinivasalu Naidu writes, It is contended by the followers of Siddha and Ayurveda systems of Medicine, that the textual matter or words are to be explained or annotated according to their context and the erudition of the scholar and no fixed value can ever be placed on a passage, unlike the very definite and unchangeable meaning of scientific or medical words or terms or passages. Such inconstancy of word meanings is unscientific and highly misleading. I had attended a meeting on “Muppu” (what exactly Muppu is no one knows) and about a dozen scholars spoke, arriving at no finality of the substance, one contending it to be derived from human urine, another from rock-salt, a third from submarine crystals on rocks, a fourth as common-salt and so ad galore. The personal factor of textual interpretation has first to be remedied for the universal acceptance of the textual matter of Ayurveda or Siddha.
    ___________________________________________

    Two Recipes, One for Immortality

    Dr. A. Shanmuga Velan, whose eulogy to siddha medicine we saw in the introduction, became interested in the possibility of significantly extending the human life span in his “college days,” and he established the Tirumular Siddha Medical Academy in Madras in 1959 to pursue knowledge of this “fundamental principle of siddha medicine.” He published the results of his research in 1963 in English, in a book entitled Siddhar’s Science of Longevity and Kalpa Medicine of India . He carried out this research with his own funding, as none was forthcoming from any government or private organization.

    In this book, Shanmuga Velan reveals details of the production of muppu. It is made of three salts, “pooneeru,” kalluppu,” and “vediyuppu.” Pooneeru is born from fuller’s earth deposits, kalluppu refers to either mined rock salt or sea salt, and vediyuppu is potassium nitrate. Following a text of the siddhar Yugi Muni, Shanmuga Velan gives the following instructions for preparation. These three salts are purified with the juice of a few of the 108 kalpa or longevity plants, and also with amuri , usually urine but what Velan describes as the “quintessence of all the waters of Seven Seas which has no taste of salt . . . the genuine magna mater.” These salts are purified with nitric acid and then calcinated. Mercury, sulphur, arsenic, and other inorganic substances are purified with “suitable medicinal plants and rendered as non-volatile substances.” These are then calcinated, and the resultant powder is mixed with the calcinated three salts to complete the formulation of muppu. This muppu has the power “to conquer everything and can penetrate every solid.” It is used to prepare medicines that can “be used as a panacea for degenerative diseases like cancer, etc.” This muppu is “highly regarded as the Elixir of life which can be safely administered to the system to rejuvenate the degenerated cellular organisms for living a longer and useful life.” 3Shanmuga Velan goes on to announce the formulation of a medicine he calls “Anti-Cancer Elixir Guru ,” and he gives a number of kalpa plants that prolong life, such as “Sarkarai vembu— Sweet margosa” and “Kodi nelli—Creeper goose-berry.”
    ____________________________________________

    [ Siddhar’s Science of Longevity and Kalpa Medicine of India Dr. A. Shanmuga Velan http://www.dkagencies.com/doc/from/1...1/details.html ]
    Last edited by Albion; 01-15-2012 at 01:55 AM.

  7. #137
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    Potentially another related tidbit for limestone:

    For us, the uninitiated vulgar masses wanting to penetrate the secrets of Alchemy, I always think that finding the idiot sons of the initiates is a good place to start our research.

    Berenger Sauniere of Rennes Le Chateau fame is one of these idiots, and he is as good as it's ever going to get.

    A couple of years before he started flaunting his wealth, the villagers noticed strange behavior from him. What was interesting was that he would go on long walks throughout the region and would bring back rocks, which he later used to make a grotto in his garden.

    Later he began to do construction works including installing a secret room in the church and set up his library. I imagine that his secret room was where he would have performed his lab work.

    After considering this, I became rather interested in the minerals of the surrounding area to get some clues about what rocks he may have been collecting. Particularly to prove or disprove my theory about quartz and iron oxide.
    It turns out that there is quartz crystal in the area, in fact there is an old quartz crystal mine formerly used by the romans on the very same hill as Rennes Le Chateau. You can read about it here:http://benhammott.com/crystal-cave.html

    There is a basalt deposit nearby called le roc noir (Black Rock) curiously also a site of a former temple knights stronghold. Therefore any streams below the black rock should have black magnetite sand, eg black iron oxide.

    It all seemed pretty solid to me, except for one small detail which I couldn't resolve at the time. And which is why I am posting this on this thread. The grotto that sauniere bilt in his garden, stood for quite a long time, apparently it did eventually fall apart and has since been reconstructed from the original rocks. Those rocks are made of Tufa, which as many of you already know is a rather pure form of limestone. I couldn't really rationalise why sauniere would want limestone, my best guess at the time was that maybe it was his tailings from his excavations of rock crystal ore. To be honest though I really couldn't explain it to my own satisfaction.
    This is what the grotto looks like today:


    Also, when Sauniere lay on his death bed, Abbé Jean Rivière came to see him and spoke to Sauniere in private. Rivière left Sauniere apparently quite upset and having refused to grant the last rites to Sauniere.
    What bothered me is that Sauniere likely clued him into some important secret, and then Rivière later went on to build his own limestone grotto inside his own church in Espéraza.
    You can read abut it here:http://www.rlcresearch.com/2007/11/11/espraza-grotto/
    And this is what it looks like:


    These grottos make me uncomfortable, because I have to concede they are significant, but I just can't explain them. So I mention it here because it is a point in favour of limestone.

    Regards
    Ghetto Alchemist
    Last edited by ghetto alchemist; 01-15-2012 at 04:30 PM.

  8. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghetto alchemist View Post
    For us, the uninitiated vulgar masses wanting to penetrate the secrets of Alchemy, I always think that finding the idiot sons of the initiates is a good place to start our research.
    great! i like these types of approaches!!! im pondering 4 some time a thread analysing adepts socializing & stone using & etc. ...

  9. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghetto alchemist View Post
    These grottos make me uncomfortable, because I have to concede they are significant, but I just can't explain them. So I mention it here because it is a point in favour of limestone.

    Regards
    Ghetto Alchemist
    The Alchemists of old times had no choice but to prepare their Chemicals all by themselves. The story of an Indian Adept (posted by Albion) searching for 3 salts by observing signs in Nature is a good example.
    Grotto made of Limestone was chosen as the fit birth place for the coagulated Spiritus Mundi, Monarch of the World and King of Salts as it was called in the past, today we call it simply Nitre (KNO3).
    This salt for it's physical manifestation needs a magnet like Limestone, moisture and protection from direct Sunlight so that bacteria can fix Spiritus Mundi into this Salt.

    It is usually found as an efflorescence on the walls of the Grottos and it was collected there. The chemical analysis of such efflorescence was following:

    Analysis of the saltpeter brush:

    Insoluble 9.2 %
    Water 1.8 % H2O

    Water soluble:
    Potassium 37.4 % K
    Calcium 0.47 % Ca
    Magnesium 0.50 % Mg
    Silica 0.035 % SiO2
    Nitrate 58.4 % NO3
    Nitrite 0.0018 % NO2
    Ammonium 0.051 % NH4
    ortho-Phospate 0.0035 % PO4
    Sulfate 0.02 % SO4
    Chloride 0.4 % Cl
    Carbonate 2.3 % CO3
    T o t a l 99.6 % .

    Fig. 2: This analysis proves, natural saltpeter brushes contain 95.1% KNO3 (saltpeter)
    The "insoluble" consists of sandy particles scratched off the wall.

    Source:
    http://www.musketeer.ch/blackpowder/saltpeter.html
    Last edited by True Initiate; 01-15-2012 at 06:39 PM.

  10. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Puffer View Post
    It is usually found as an efflorescence on the walls of the Grottos and it was collected there.
    Possibly related: Kalksalpeter

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