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Thread: Robert Allen Bartlett - Real Alchemy

  1. #11
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    Bartlett, John Reid, Brian Cotnoir are great; Jack Glass and Russ House, I find their work to be well-rounded, and part of the original group of alchemists under the guidance of Frater Albertus. American alchemist Jack Glass is especially knowledgable on the vegetable realm. Mark Stavish, I find his approach quite refined, his explanations are richly layered in spirituality, as well as, he seems to have superior insight in simplifying (but not butchering) his approach to practical alchemy; he is well-versed in using kabbala-system as the framework.

    There's an alchemist in Toronto, Canada by the name of James Collins who's also quite experienced in both the vegetable and metal kingdoms. If you e-mail him, he'll be more than happy to help.

    Dubuis is in a league of his own.

    Roger Caro is a legend.

    I get the sense that those that actually made the Philosopher's Stone are very private; they prefer to blend into the crowd. For majority of the alchemical work (i.e., vegetable stone, etc.) resources are available. For more serious work, those that mastered it, prefer strict anonymity!
    Introitus apertus ad occlusum Regis palatium / Labore et coeli favore / Nosce te ipsum

  2. #12
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    I had not come across Jack Glass before. I will have a look. I plan to fork out the for the PON material.

    I agree James Collins very good. Sometimes the authors listed have different variations of processes, but I think Collins often has more detail. I think he studied the PON also
    http://alchymie.ca/aboutme.htm

  3. #13
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    thoth: I found American alchemist Jack Glass the most informative of the group that studied under Frater Albertus, in Parcelsus College. His explanations are also profound-yet-pratical, I believe he fully mastered the vegetable kingdom. He's also humourous. He regularly held workshops in the States, some parts of Canada; was hand-picked by the inner group of the Rosicrucian Order to teach alchemy. He has passed on. If you can get some video recordings, then you're a foretunate man.
    Introitus apertus ad occlusum Regis palatium / Labore et coeli favore / Nosce te ipsum

  4. #14
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    Thanks for the advice Krisztian, I will definitely try to get hold of his material. Frater Albertus was the first book on Alchemy which I got all those years ago

  5. #15
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    There is a 2 dvd set featuring Jack Glass and Russ House at triad-publishing dealing with the herbal path.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lapis Ignis View Post
    There is a 2 dvd set featuring Jack Glass and Russ House at triad-publishing dealing with the herbal path.
    I own that set by Triad Publishing. It's worth the purchase.

    There's some practical wisdom in-between their demonstrations and interactions with the audience. You know, thoth, some things you just can't learn from reading books. Public demonstrations, workshops, seminars, etc. sometimes have more to offer. Jack Glass is one of my favorite personage in the modern alchemy movement because he approaches the Royal Art with humour and wisdom.
    Introitus apertus ad occlusum Regis palatium / Labore et coeli favore / Nosce te ipsum

  7. #17
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    Yes, it can be such a serious subject at times, it's nice to have a bit of humour. I think it was Frater Albertus or was he quoting somone, that said you shouldn't keep your bow taught all the time

    I plan to get the Jack Glass videos when I'm back home.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by thoth View Post
    Yes, it can be such a serious subject at times, it's nice to have a bit of humour. I think it was Frater Albertus or was he quoting somone, that said you shouldn't keep your bow taught all the time
    Yes, that's a good one! I found that in my lab work if I don't have a sense of lightheartedness then I'll go crazy. I wouldn't be able to survive all of my failures. And, god only knows I've had more than my share. (A serious practitioner would never survive; would get consumed by his or her failures.)
    Introitus apertus ad occlusum Regis palatium / Labore et coeli favore / Nosce te ipsum

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    Have you read this book?

    I am mostly beginning with practical alchemy and I wanted to check if one of the more advanced ones has been following this book and if it is worthy to follow its instructions or not.

    My other option is John Reid's book.
    Zoas, 8 years have passed since this posting. This book has helped you advance ? Did you follow the experiments described there? A I ask you because I just started studying it and it's actually my first practical alchemy book

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiberius View Post
    Zoas, 8 years have passed since this posting. This book has helped you advance ? Did you follow the experiments described there? A I ask you because I just started studying it and it's actually my first practical alchemy book
    It's hard to answer that first question. I prefer to send you a message as to avoid being unfair.

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