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Thread: brachion - forearm

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    brachion - forearm

    Fulcanelli focussed so much on the greek cabala, I often feel he misses so much
    of the hebrew.

    "The Castle of Dampierre VI (Panel 3) --- Lying on the altar of sacrifice, a forearm is consumed by fire. The sign of this fiery emblem holds in two words: .FELIX.INFORTUNIUM. Happy unhappiness! Although the topic seems a priori quite obscure and without equivalent in the hermetic literature and iconography, yet it yields to analysis and perfectly agrees with the Great Work's technique.

    The human forearm, which the Greeks simply called the arm (brachion), is the hieroglyph for the short, abridged way (ars brevis). As a matter of fact, our Adept, toying with words as the learned cabalist he is, hides under the substantive brachion, arm, a comparative of brachus, written in the same fashion. The latter means short, brief, of short duration, and forms several compounds, including brachutes, brevity. Thus the comparative brachion, meaning brief, the homonym of brachion, arm, takes on the specific meaning of brief technique, ars brevis."

    The forearm has an entirely different significance which is related to alchemy.
    The forearm was the ancient measure of the cubit or ell.


    ½, 1, 1½, 2 and 3½ Cubits Light LifeTM Rings.

    http://www.slimspurling.com/
    http://serpentrioarquila.blogspot.com/

    "To conjure is nothing else than to observe anything rightly, to know and understand what it is." - Paracelsus

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    "Felix infortunum" is the key in this hyroglyph that hides the two necessary compounds for the ars brevis. Namely the (f)-ELIX or the "sharp" and the (in)FORTU(num) or "strong". Which when looking at historic writing... does comply.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephælios View Post
    "Felix infortunum" is the key in this hyroglyph that hides the two necessary compounds for the ars brevis. Namely the (f)-ELIX or the "sharp" and the (in)FORTU(num) or "strong". Which when looking at historic writing... does comply.
    thanks hephailos. i think i get your meaning.
    http://serpentrioarquila.blogspot.com/

    "To conjure is nothing else than to observe anything rightly, to know and understand what it is." - Paracelsus

    "Why, then, don't you act when you see the danger of your conditioning? The answer is you don't see... seeing is acting." J. Krishnamurti

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