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Thread: what seperation methods work in the wet method

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigwamman View Post
    this happent to me as well ...
    Yes, confirmation. The most probable answer to this observation is that we have calcium chloride, which is deiquescent. But calcium should have been dissolved in the previous step, at pH 5. ..

  2. #22
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    A positive flame test for calcium ion should give a "brick red" flame, like this:

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flame_test

  3. #23
    you can maby react it with some h2So4 this would drop the calcium out as calcium sulphate, this will not dissolve in hcl, and is slightly water soluble (0.24g/100ml) in this way you can test is the calcium sulphate will look very white and is very fine, (you can rub it in your skin)

    it also is not soluble "or to a small extend" in acetone (the calcium chloride) and ethanol and m-gold chloride is so thats a other test you can do
    although im not sure on the acetone part that the gold is soluble in it,

    with love...
    Last edited by Wigwamman; 11-23-2013 at 11:54 PM.

  4. #24
    maby somting to think about..

    in the book the alchemist, they mention the color of the stone witch was pale yellow and was warped in wax the elixir was a transparent colorless liquid,

    well this is the same color stone that i made witch was also pale yellow and very hard but bridle, it dissolved because of its hydrocopic nature, but maby thats ware the wax was for to not let it dissolve, this is a chlorine stone and maby there are other acids to do the same thing but have a other color and a non hydroscopic properties, because there is allot of talk around the red color maby phosphoric acid or h2so4...


    with love...

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigwamman View Post
    you can maby react it with some h2So4 this would drop the calcium out as calcium sulphate, this will not dissolve in hcl, and is slightly water soluble (0.24g/100ml) in this way you can test is the calcium sulphate will look very white and is very fine, (you can rub it in your skin)
    That's correct, nice idea! I tried this test for calcium by dissolving some of the deliquescent salt in distilled water added battery acid, and no precipitation formed (its been two days now without any precipitation). I'll try it again later with bigger quantities of the salt.

  6. #26
    That's correct, nice idea! I tried this test for calcium by dissolving some of the deliquescent salt in distilled water added battery acid, and no precipitation formed (its been two days now without any precipitation). I'll try it again later with bigger quantities of the salt.
    ok this looks like it is not calsium then because that stuff likes to fall out almost instant,

    i believe that some of it is still magnesium... but maybe you can test that by dissolving it in some acetone or dry ethanol,

    i was going to try something to see what would happen when you have pure ormus and would add some H2so4 to see what kind of salt i would get. something like ormus sulfate or something, and see what the color would be and what the melting temperature may be, i would like to do that with phosphoric acid as well,

    with love....

  7. #27
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    The Fool,
    I have recently done this calcium chloride to calcium sulfate precipitation by adding sulfuric acid, when the solution is cold, it is crystal clear and stays clear indefinately.
    For me, the calcium sulfate precipitate only forms when the solution is heated to near boiling.

    So if you might want to redo your test with the battery acid and then apply some heat and see.

    G Alchemist

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghetto alchemist View Post
    The Fool,
    I have recently done this calcium chloride to calcium sulfate precipitation by adding sulfuric acid, when the solution is cold, it is crystal clear and stays clear indefinately.
    For me, the calcium sulfate precipitate only forms when the solution is heated to near boiling.

    So if you might want to redo your test with the battery acid and then apply some heat and see.

    G Alchemist
    Thanks for your input.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigwamman View Post
    i believe that some of it is still magnesium... but maybe you can test that by dissolving it in some acetone or dry ethanol,
    Ok, I dissolved some of it in alcohol (95%). So, part of it is soluble in alcohol. Wikipedia says that magnesium chloride is soluble in alcohol. So, probably this white precipitate is a mixture of calcium chloride (deliquescence) and magnesium chloride (alcohol solubility). I will try to see if the soluble salt is deliquescent too.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by theFool View Post
    Ok, I dissolved some of it in alcohol (95%). So, part of it is soluble in alcohol. Wikipedia says that magnesium chloride is soluble in alcohol. So, probably this white precipitate is a mixture of calcium chloride (deliquescence) and magnesium chloride (alcohol solubility). I will try to see if the soluble salt is deliquescent too.
    This salt that was dissolved in alcohol, was coagulated by evaporating the alcohol. Then, left out in the cold for one night, it got deliquescent by the morning. I tried again to see if it is calcium chloride by dissolving in distilled water and adding battery acid (also heated it this time!) but no precipitate formed. So .. it seems that this salt is a deliquescent magnesium chloride, from a chemical viewpoint.

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