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Thread: Aspects of Alchemy

  1. #301
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    Hahahahaha another hilarious free gift from AlchemyForums. Cheers JDP. Its great when you can understand the meaning someone implys from a song. Hard to do and great to experience. Thanks again.
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  2. #302
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Because it is "fermented" with gold or silver. Platinum wasn't known to the ancients. Maybe it is actually possible to transmute base metals into other "noble" metals that were unknown to them. It would be a matter of "fermenting" the Stone with platinum, palladium, rhodium, etc. and seeing if it can also transmute into them.

    From my own "chymical" experiments, it seems to me that transmutation is a one-way street: it goes from the more active metals (or "baser" metals, in the parlance of older times) to the more inert metals (or "nobler" metals, in the parlance of older times.) You can make silver (more inert metal) from copper, lead, tin, bismuth, etc. (more active metals), and you can make gold (more inert metal) from silver (less inert metal), but not the other way around. There appears to be some type of "evolutionary" thing going on with metals, if we are permitted to use a biological analogy. It's as if metals seek the more "stable/inert" forms, if forced to radically change by either chymical or alchemical operations.
    That sounds a lot like one of those "fanciful theories" of the ancients to me! I guess, seeing what they and you saw, you just can't help coming up with such ideas.

  3. #303
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Sternbach View Post
    That sounds a lot like one of those "fanciful theories" of the ancients to me! I guess, seeing what they and you saw, you just can't help coming up with such ideas.
    The difference is that they saw it in terms of "perfection" or "nobility", which is a totally arbitrary human concept being imposed on observable phenomena, while I see it in terms of stability/inertness, which is based on empirical facts (base metals are more reactive than so-called noble metals)

  4. #304
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    The difference is that they saw it in terms of "perfection" or "nobility", which is a totally arbitrary human concept being imposed on observable phenomena, while I see it in terms of stability/inertness, which is based on empirical facts (base metals are more reactive than so-called noble metals)
    It was an analogy. Just like you have used analogies in the highlighted statements, when you talked about an "evolutionary thing going on with metals" and even suggested they have something akin to a will of their own.

    Isn't it remarkable that modern chemistry still talks about "noble metals", not to mention "noble gases"?

  5. #305
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Sternbach View Post
    It was an analogy. Just like you have used analogies in the highlighted statements, when you talked about an "evolutionary thing going on with metals" and even suggested they have something akin to a will of their own.
    So was mine regarding "evolution". I am not suggesting that metals are really "alive" and have a "will".

    Isn't it remarkable that modern chemistry still talks about "noble metals", not to mention "noble gases"?
    Old habits are hard to break.

  6. #306
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    So was mine regarding "evolution". I am not suggesting that metals are really "alive" and have a "will".
    Obviously not. And I think the ancients also could tell the difference between the growth of a plant and that of a metal vein.

    But life is a matter of definition. It wasn't defined rigorously until relatively late. And the modern definition still leaves us with cases that are ambiguous.

    Old habits are hard to break.
    Especially if they are ones that make sense. Mind works with analogies. And there are generally good reasons for that.

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