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Thread: Symbolism of the Latin letters

  1. #11
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    Thanks zoas23, I wish you well.

    What do you think of the saying, "Actions speak louder than words"?

    Ghislain

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghislain View Post
    Thanks zoas23, I wish you well.

    What do you think of the saying, "Actions speak louder than words"?

    Ghislain
    This thread is going places! Hahaha... I like it. My flu is going places too.

    I don't think the phrase makes a lot of sense because of a lot of reasons. Speaking, Writing, Thinking... such things are actions too.

    And if we go to the most complex actions, they are very much defined by our language. I mean, their sense.

    So... I think the phrase makes sense ONLY when it is related to a context in which a person SAYS something, but DOES the opposite... Like in this video from the French TV about the hypocrites of Monsanto, who made the Country where I live their Lab and we became their rats (with the kind help of our government, which allowed Monsanto to practice such monstrosity here).



    So... in this kind of context... yes, Actions speak louder than words (but don't we need words as to get why this murderer is a murderer?).

  3. #13
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    I've asked many friends to help me with this issue... so far none of them knew anything on the subject, but one of them who became an expert on the subject due to his obsession with Hebrew, Greek and Latin Calligraphy (both its practice and its history) used google and found something... in Wikipedia:

    Gaius Julius Hyginus, who recorded much Roman mythology, mentions in Fab. 277 the legend that it was Carmenta, the Cimmerian Sibyl, who altered fifteen letters of the Greek alphabet to become the Latin alphabet, which her son Evander introduced into Latium, supposedly 60 years before the Trojan War, but there is no historically sound basis to this tale.

    "The Parcae, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos invented seven Greek letters — A B H T I Y. Others say that Mercury invented them from the flight of cranes, which, when they fly, form letters. Palamedes, too, son of Nauplius, invented eleven letters; Simonides, too, invented four letters — Ó E Z PH; Epicharmus of Sicily, two — P and PS. The Greek letters Mercury is said to have brought to Egypt, and from Egypt Cadmus took them to Greece. Cadmus in exile from Arcadia, took them to Italy, and his mother Carmenta changed them to Latin to the number of 15. Apollo on the lyre added the rest."
    Quite far from what I'm trying to find, but still a *myth* about the origin of the letters.

    He also told me that this lack of a well defined myth is probably due to the Roman lack of interest in "esotericism" and that the haruspicia (an intuitive divination system based on "reading" the disposition of the internal organs of a sacrificed animal) was probably the only "magic" practiced in the Roman civilization... whilst other esoteric practices existed among the Romans (like the mystery cults to Kubelé, Mithras or Isis), but with the knowledge that they were "imported" rites and unrelated to the Latin alphabet.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    He also told me that this lack of a well defined myth is probably due to the Roman lack of interest in "esotericism"
    Curious. Maybe this was around the time when the West switched from Mythological thinking to Philosophic thinking?

    I would imagine that the "myths" transmuted themselves into more logical expressions... Just my thoughts. At least, I think they're my thoughts (Descartes)
    Last edited by Kiorionis; 05-06-2016 at 05:20 AM.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    Curious. Maybe this was around the time when the West switched from Mythological thinking to Philosophic thinking?

    I would imagine that the "myths" transmuted themselves into more logical expressions... Just my thoughts. At least, I think they're my thoughts (Descartes)
    ... Don't forget that Philosophy began as a praxis to ascend the Soul! (Pythagoras, Plato)...

    I'm not very much into the theories of the "ages" of Mankind, because they have a tendency to overlap.

    I was thinking about something else, or another theory: myths.

    The two examples I had in mind (Greeks and Hebrews) have something in common: a creational myth that made them "special"... a creational myth that mostly said: "God (or the Gods) created mankind, but mostly He (or them) created US".

    The Romans were incredibly different... a virgin who was not allowed to have children has twins, Rhea Silvia, of course... her origins are Trojan. The father of the twins is a God (Mars)... but she had to throw her Children into a river because the King (who was her father) feared that they may coup him. They are saved from the river by a she-wolf and later adopted by a Shepherd and his wife... and finally one of the twins murder the other one (Romulus murders Remus) to become the king of Rome... and, then he has to kidnap the Sabine women due to the lack of women in his kingdom.

    [t's hardly surprising that the Roman Empire adopted the Christian religion... their myth of how they existed has many things in common with the Old and New Testament -a Virgin who has sons, a shepherd who becomes the "adoptive father" of a King, a "special person" being thrown into a river as to save him from an angry King... a brother that murders his brother!]

    This myth that explained the Romans why they existed was very *cosmopolitan* and did not give the Romans a privileged position among the different *tribes*, but actually made them think of themselves as a multicultural society with a diversity of origins. Probably this myth completely clashed against the idea of a God or a group of Gods creating "The Romans" in Latin... and the Military "success" of the Roman Empire probably has a lot to do with this myth (assimilation of the "enemy")...

    I was thinking about my favorite Roman writer, Apuleius... and he was a Berber (from the zone of the current Country of Algeria), but also a Roman who spoke Latin.

    I even took the issue to modern times and thought of Italian Fascism and the ORIGINAL notion of "race" that Italian Fascism had (before they had to come to terms with Hitler) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Fascism#Race ... which mostly consisted on the idea that everyone had to be Italianized... but they were very far from having the ethnic racist tone of Nazism [such thing doesn't make me like Fascism... I completely reject it, but I was thinking about its relations with the "Roman myth"].

    Could this one be the reason that made the Romans not feel interested in developing theories about their own alphabet? Maybe they thought that there wasn't something *special* in it?

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