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Thread: Why is Fulcanelli so popular?

  1. #1
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    Why is Fulcanelli so popular?

    Why is Fulcanelli so popular?

    That's a big question mark for me. At least in the Spanish speaking world, he is definitely considered the #1 alchemist.

    If you go to a *normal* bookstore, you won't find ANY books about alchemy... with the exception of one of the two books by Fulcanelly... which are quite likely to be there.

    If you ask a person who only has a minor interest in alchemy to name a famous alchemist, in most of the cases you'll hear "Fulcanelli".

    We currently have another thread about him: http://forum.alchemyforums.com/showt...ith-Fulcanelli!

    But this one has the intention of being more "relaxed"... so only 2 questions:

    1) Is Fulcanelli extremely relevant for you? Why?

    2) Why do you think that he became the "most popular" or even "mainstream" alchemist when his books are not really the most "user-friendly" books on the subject?

  2. #2
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    Because he is one of few better known contemporary alchemists. He is even believed to have reached the highest heights of the art. According to Canseliet, he could rejuvenate himself, became an immortal, and ascended to a higher plane of existence.

    That he is so mysterious and intangible contributes to his myth. Some kind of Doctor Who, really!

    My own introduction to Fulcanelli (in fact, to alchemy) was by The Morning of the Magicians, a book I read with great interest as a teenager.

    What does he mean to me now? Well, I still find the legend around him inspiring, whether it's based on facts or not. And I read what he has written with interest, but I don't necessarily consider him more reliable than other authors. At the moment, I tend more towards Medieval alchemists like Geber, Lull, Arnald, but I consider that, in practical alchemy, it's important to keep an open mind.

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    I wrote some comments for the other thread but did not post because those folks are discussing processes. Fulcanelli has no process. It is just entertainment. That’s why Fulcanelli is so popular.

    Fulcanelli is not relevant to lab work for me. It did fascinate me with the historical perspective on the Cathedrals and the curious alchemical emblems found there and in some dwellings. That material was the most interesting but it was plagiarized.

    Fulcanelli was not an alchemist nor was he a contemporary of anyone, just a composite character like Harry Potter invented to serve a purpose and that was entertainment.

    Morning of the Magicians was a very popular book full of the best enticing lore from alchemy and other mysterious subjects. It inspired many to investigate alchemy further. So did Harry Potter and Full Metal Alchemist cartoons.

    Since Fulcanelli was an invented character why would anyone want to study the lab work of his apprentice. It is all the folly of those creators of Fulcanelli believing in their creation.

    This Fulcanelli phenomenon reminds me of the Mandela Effect discussed in another thread. People still see Elvis in Burger King and Jesus in a ham sandwich. Alchemists still try to put together some lab experiments based on Fulcanelli’s writings even though it is fairly common knowledge on internet alchemy forums that Fulcanelli was an invention of possibly three people.

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    What concerns enigmatic statues carved in stone there are not much alternatives. Fulcanelli is one of the few who deals with it. I would love to read a book about Stephansdom cathedral in Vienna but there isn't such a book.
    Formerly known as True Puffer

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    Interesting perspectives.

    Fulcanelli and Canseliet (specially Canselit) have been a BIG influence for me, but mostly their ways of making comparisons between alchemy and art in their own peculiar ways (I prefer Canseliet in that sense). Though I am still surprised by the popularity of Fulcanelli... probably one of the least "user-friendly" alchemists I could mention.

    Your vision, z0 K, is very interesting for me... the idea that the "process of Fulcanelli" doesn't exist. I can't give my opinion on the subject, but I can say that if there is one, then it's for sure one of the most complicated ones ever imagined (or at least his way of explaining it).

  6. #6
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    In a few words, I think the myth of Fulcanelli touches some archetype of our unconscious, which makes us identify with him.
    The mysterious and unfashionable character, follower of a tradition invaluable and almost lost, possessed of an ancient wisdom, are irresistible engaging elements.
    Come on, who does not like being Fulcanelli?
    Clearly, we are psychologically projected on him. At least I believe so...

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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    At least in the Spanish speaking world, he is definitely considered the #1 alchemist.
    Strange. Thought it would be Llull.

    I think Paracelsus, Roger Bacon, John Dee, Count de Saint Germain, Cagliostro and Basil Valentinus would be - in general - the most famous names.


    Don’t let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dev View Post
    Strange. Thought it would be Llull.
    I think Paracelsus, Roger Bacon, John Dee, Count de Saint Germain, Cagliostro and Basil Valentinus would be - in general - the most famous names.
    Hahaha... no, not at all. Though there is an area of fame for Llull:the Island of Mallorca in Spain... but mostly because he is the local hero.
    In the rest of the Spanish speaking world... the levels of popularity would be:
    Paracelsus: similar to Woody Allen... who hasn't watched a film by him?

    Roger Bacon: Parajanov

    John Dee: Stan Brakhage

    Saint Germain: a weird case... he is famous among the followers of a very widespread school of Spiritism (Kardec) that follows the teachings received in alleged channelings by Cony Mendez and Rubén Cedeño... though both of them and their disciples constantly write books by "Saint Germain", who somehow replaced "Jesus" in their Religion... commonly known as the Religion of "I am" (or "Yo soy" in Spanish... a phrase that "Saint Germain" told Cony Mendez during a channeling, obviously taken from the Hebrew AHYH and the episode of Moses when he received the laws).
    So the "Saint Germain" that is popular is mostly Cony Mendez's Saint Germain... unrelated to Alchemy and actually unrelated to Saint Germain. Some books of this weird trend:




    The titles of these books by "Saint Germain" are, following the order in which I showed them:
    -"The Practice of the Flames (I am the resurrection and the life. I am the light, the path and the truth)"
    -The Violets of love
    -Conversations about "I am"
    -Knowledge of the Being in depth.

    So THIS Saint Germain is somehow "famous", but unrelated to alchemy and unrelated to the real Saint-Germain.

    Cagliostro: Derek Jarman

    Basil Velentine: Dziga Vertov

    (There is however a school of Kardecian spiritism, the "competence" of Cony Mendez, called "Basil Valentine"... but they don't relate this name to the Alchemist, but a spirit that used that name and is NOT the alchemist).

    ____________________________________________

    Fulcanelli is definitely the "most popular" in the Spanish speaking countries. I wouldn't be able to say who is the "second most famous", but the second is miles away from Fulcanelli.

    ____________________________________________

    Of course, I assumed that the situation was identical all over the word. Those who aren't shy about where they live:

    Where do you live and who is the most popular alchemist in your country?

  9. #9
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    I live in Switzerland, and the most famous alchemist here is Paracelsus. Quite recently, I visited the pharmacy museum in Basel which is located in a house frequently visited by Theophrastus, because a rich long term patient of his was living there. Besides loads of pharmaceutical preparations, you can see two restored alchemical laboratories there. Those of you who visit Switzerland, don't miss the opportunity to visit this inspiring exhibition (and do drop me a message in advance ).

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    Most popular in Scandinavia are Strindberg and Swedenborg.


    Don’t let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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