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Thread: Why is Fulcanelli so popular?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illen A. Cluf View Post
    Interesting comment. I think that the reason why some refer to the past alchemists is that they regard them as the more legitimate source of alchemical understanding. In more recent times, these people (myself included) feel that alchemy has come off the tracks and has completely distorted what the past alchemists were trying to say. For the most part, alchemy doesn't modernize. It is a specific process that only works in a specific way. So alchemy doesn't really relate to past or modern trends. Thus, for these people, we revere the past and find the writings far more valid than the more modern writings.
    If we are talking about the quite famous contemporary authors who offer their $1000 dollars seminars (no need to offer names, we all know who they are)... then you are right.
    Other than that, some simply technologies probably improved the practice of alchemy (I assume that most of the "old" alchemists would have LOVED to have something as simple as a digital thermometer).
    But I don't agree with the idea of a "lost tradition"... I actually think that at all times there were persons doing something of worth and persons doing nonsense. I simply don't like the mentality of "how unlike I am! If only I had been born in the XIII century!"... this does not mean that I do not adore the classics (I do and this is not limited to alchemy).

    Quote Originally Posted by Illen A. Cluf View Post
    But for other things, I agree. We all seem to think that the past was better. Sure, things were more romantic then, and much more honorable, but today's society is so much better off than the past society. Health, education, science, medicine, technology, have all improved immensely. The only major things that have not changed for the better are politics and religion. Those are the two past Demons that we seem unable to ever improve upon.
    Yeah, I don't get the "Romantic vision" of the past... some people has different fetishes with different times (i.e, those who think that the classical Athens was like a paradise and do not realize that it was a society ruled by a small elite and based on slave work -I love Plato, but he was far from living in "Paradise").

    The hemlock is present at all times, it simply "mutates"... and there is always someone being forced to drink it under different shapes. No need to romanticize the past.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    If we are talking about the quite famous contemporary authors who offer their $1000 dollars seminars (no need to offer names, we all know who they are)... then you are right.
    Other than that, some simply technologies probably improved the practice of alchemy (I assume that most of the "old" alchemists would have LOVED to have something as simple as a digital thermometer).
    But I don't agree with the idea of a "lost tradition"... I actually think that at all times there were persons doing something of worth and persons doing nonsense. I simply don't like the mentality of "how unlike I am! If only I had been born in the XIII century!"... this does not mean that I do not adore the classics (I do and this is not limited to alchemy).
    That's why I said "for the most part". I do believe that some processes were improved, but that the basics remained the same. I actually DO believe that alchemy today is mostly a "lost tradition", and I wouldn't hesitate to say that there is nobody alive today that has actually made the true Philosophers Stone. I also STRONGLY believe that the majority - if not all - of the processes commonly talked about today are totally off the mark.



    Yeah, I don't get the "Romantic vision" of the past... some people has different fetishes with different times (i.e, those who think that the classical Athens was like a paradise and do not realize that it was a society ruled by a small elite and based on slave work -I love Plato, but he was far from living in "Paradise").
    Life in those days was certainly not as rosy as many seem to suggest. However, there were periods such as during the Renaissance, when the pursuit for knowledge was encouraged, and knightly honor, dignity and honesty was also highly encouraged and practiced. Today, honor, honesty and dignity has lost most of its meaning, and few practice it.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illen A. Cluf View Post
    That's why I said "for the most part". I do believe that some processes were improved, but that the basics remained the same. I actually DO believe that alchemy today is mostly a "lost tradition", and I wouldn't hesitate to say that there is nobody alive today that has actually made the true Philosophers Stone. I also STRONGLY believe that the majority - if not all - of the processes commonly talked about today are totally off the mark.
    I don't agree with the idea of a "lost tradition"... I think that the amount of people doing nonsense compared to the amount of people doing something of worth was more or less similar at all times.

    Quote Originally Posted by Illen A. Cluf View Post
    Life in those days was certainly not as rosy as many seem to suggest. However, there were periods such as during the Renaissance, when the pursuit for knowledge was encouraged, and knightly honor, dignity and honesty was also highly encouraged and practiced. Today, honor, honesty and dignity has lost most of its meaning, and few practice it.
    I love a lot of Renaissance authors... but do you mean the times when the Americas were being raped in a greedy search for gold? The times in which the Church was selling indulgences of salvation and people were buying them as candy? The times in which the Medici family did both amazing things and the most corrupt things?

    The Golden Age is happening all the time... The worst time is also happening all the time.

    A quote that I love... by Wittgenstein:

    " If good or bad willing changes the world, it can only change the limits of the world, not the facts; not the things that can be expressed in language.
    In brief, the world must thereby become quite another. It must so to speak wax or wane as a whole. The world of the happy man is a different one from that of the unhappy man".

    Hahaha... I like it when conversations travel from subject to subject... but my dear Andro gets nervous when such thing happens.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post

    Hahaha... I like it when conversations travel from subject to subject... but my dear Andro gets nervous when such thing happens.
    Yes, I think we're down to opinions now, and we are definitely straying off course.

  5. #25
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    I appreciate Fulcanelli because he is unique, very well written, mysterious and complicated.

    If anyone has a spare copy of The Dwellings of the Philosophers lying around I'd love to have it!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    What concerns enigmatic statues carved in stone there are not much alternatives. Fulcanelli is one of the few who deals with it. I would love to read a book about Stephansdom cathedral in Vienna but there isn't such a book.
    I recognized interesting symbols on the Stephansdom too when I visited Vienna. For example, what I saw immediately was the Woman and the lion and she held the lion's head just like on the tarot card "La Force". It is above the main entrance on the right side.

    I am reading Fulcanellis Cathedrals these days and it has quite an effect on me. I like to think about those language of the birds thing and come up with some play on word by myself. Further, after having thought about the symbol of the old man finding the alcahest in the roots of a hollow oaktree and Fulcanelli referring to Maria as the Morningstar and "the root" I remembered that in my hometown until the 1920ies there was still a hollow oaktree called "Donarseiche" (Oak of Thor/Donar), where people put through small sick babies so that they get well again. The priest of course, should not have known anything about those things.
    Now very close to where this tree was standing, today there is still an ancient coppermill. It didn't really blew my mind, but this is a connection only I could discover, so it was quite fun. If it's any worth or not.

  7. #27
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    After reading Fulcanelli yet again i am more and more inclined to think that it was authored by few people. The reason being that some parts of the book contradict the other parts. The brilliant part of the book is how to read a cathedral like a book carved in stone (authored by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz) but the most important part, about practical alchemy was authored by Champagne.
    This explains why Canseliet was totally lacking the brilliance of Fulcanelli in his own works because he was only the pupil of Champagne but not of R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz!!

    The mystery of the cathedrals which bears encrypted insights into the practical alchemical opus, can be recognised as a fluid amalgam of

    (1) Schwaller’s material on the alchemical symbolique of the cathedrals;

    (2) numerous symbolic digressions on the ‘phonetic kabbalah’ adapted from the work of the deeply erudite classicist and Hermetic philosopher, Pierre Dujols (1862-1926); and

    (3) the overall synthesis and presentation of Champagne himself, who also furnished the illustrations.


    Great article about this matter:

    http://www.aaroncheak.com/call-of-fire/
    Formerly known as True Puffer

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    Great article about this matter:

    http://www.aaroncheak.com/call-of-fire/
    Aaron Cheak is likely the World's greatest authority on Rene Schwaller de Lubicz.

  9. #29
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    Oh lol so that's where Illen comes from. IllenACluf fulCAnellI

  10. #30
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    boo
    Last edited by Kibric; 08-31-2017 at 11:37 AM. Reason: silly to try and engage others in conversation

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