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Thread: The Mineral Identification Key

  1. #21
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    That one was from "Mysteries of the Cathedrals".
    Formerly known as True Puffer

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    Maybe this one?

    What kind of mineral is this? It indeed looks like a book.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    What kind of mineral is this? It indeed looks like a book.
    I believe it is Zinnwaldite.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinnwaldite

  4. #24
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    I think you are correct, i think this was it.
    Of course i don't know exactly which mineral Fulcanelli had in mind but until now i found these to match Fulcanellis descriptions:

    1. Graphite including Anthracite coal
    2. Biotite or Black Mica
    3. Muscovite
    4. Zinnwaldite

    Guys if you find other minerals that match Fulcanelli's description please share it in my thread.
    Formerly known as True Puffer

  5. #25
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    Look at this beauty. This is Muscovite with garnet intrusion.



    Again Muscovite books:

    Formerly known as True Puffer

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    I think you are correct, i think this was it.
    Of course i don't know exactly which mineral Fulcanelli had in mind but until now i found these to match Fulcanellis descriptions:

    1. Graphite including Anthracite coal
    2. Biotite or Black Mica
    3. Muscovite
    4. Zinnwaldite

    Guys if you find other minerals that match Fulcanelli's description please share it in my thread.
    Pyrrhotite can also crystallize in such "leafy" or laminar structures:



    There's a number of minerals that can form in such shapes.

  7. #27
    All so called layer silicates (clay earth) show similar properties or layers. Layer silicates stand for its own class of minerals.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by True Initiate View Post
    Look at this beauty. This is Muscovite with garnet intrusion.
    Again, don't forget that is must be "very common", and "found everywhere".

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illen A. Cluf View Post
    Again, don't forget that (Starting Matter) this must be "very common", and "found everywhere".
    YES!!!

    And also not a mineral(!!!)

    Do we not know How To Read Alchemy Texts?

    Our Matter has the attributes and characteristics of a mineral but is not a mineral.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmuldvich View Post

    Our Matter has the attributes and characteristics of a mineral but is not a mineral.
    Or - a mineral in a very "confused" state.

    Mineral

    noun
    1. any of a class of substances occurring in nature, usually comprising inorganic substances, as quartz or feldspar, of definite chemical composition and usually of definite crystal structure, but sometimes also including rocks formed by these substances as well as certain natural products of organic origin, as asphalt or coal.
    2. a substance obtained by mining, as ore.
    3. (loosely) any substance that is neither animal nor vegetable.


    Actually, substances such as coal are sometimes considered NOT to be a mineral. Here's a better list of criteria:

    To be a mineral a substance must meet five requirements:

    1. naturally occurring (not made by humans)
    2. inorganic (not produced by an organism)
    3. solid
    4. a limited range of chemical compositions
    5. ordered atomic structure



    Here's something interesting. Water is liquid, not solid, so it is not a mineral. BUT a snowflake is solid, is produced naturally, and meets all the criteria. So, guess what? It's a mineral!

    See:
    https://geology.com/articles/water-mineral/
    Last edited by Illen A. Cluf; 01-29-2018 at 09:06 PM.

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