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Thread: The Solar Path

  1. #151
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    I imagine also, since this is a hermetic practise of sort's, that a properly prepared 'magic mirror' would also yeild slightly altered forms of this/these? substances.

    Hermetics. We want sunlight. What reflects that? The Moon? Which metals holds the energetic signature of the moon? Ect.. Ect... Unto the perfect day.
    If at first you don't succeed....

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aham View Post
    Also seems to me that we need to do this for ~6 hour so unless you have an automated sun tracking mount, you'll be tweaking with the manual mount every few minutes.

    With the 200mm, I'd worry about mirror distortion due to heat since they are generally expected to be used at night when it's somewhat cooler

    Will definitely want to see pics.
    Yes, it's a 700$ mount that I use for astrophotography. And distortion really isn't as big an issue as you would think. The mirror itself doesn't heat up all that much because the light is distributed, but I'll double check. The glass plate it's coated onto is about an inch thick. If nothing else, I can drop a fan underneath it. I use it for solar viewing frequently

    From what I've been reading, non-vacuum should produce a powder while vacuum produces a liquid? It'll be a fun experiment either way. Real question is if I have enough back-focus to put the focal point well beyond the glass wall of the flask. Either way, with a 1200mm focal length, the intense heat near the eyepiece without a filter is going to be dangerous. That's why we don't filter sunlight at the eyepiece, it's done by shielding in front of the primary optic

    In any case, it's a better mirror than anyone in the ancient world would have had. Telescope tech has mostly been developed in the last 300-400 years. That said, surface area means a lot, like car guys say "there's no replacement for displacement," same kind of thing. A parabolic mirror isn't that hard to make, and a four foot foil trap beats tiny an highly reflective any old day of the week. At least for "catching" the light. Like a giant shiny satellite dish with a flask at the focal point, haha.

  3. #153
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    Oh, side note. If you do decide on a DIY path, tracking mounts are simple enough. You won't get 2 hour exposures of the milky way, but a simple incline, facing directly toward the nearest celestial pole (south or north), a wee little motor, and some clever gearing and speed manipulating, and you've got a sun tracker. The principle is pretty simple. Tweak until it's lined up correctly, then click it on, check every 20-30 minutes to make small adjustments if needed.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    Yes, it's a 700$ mount that I use for astrophotography.
    Damn! $700 for a mount is a bit spendy but I'm sure it keeps the telescope stable as a rock while tracking with pinpoint accuracy. Definitely need that for astrophotography

    My 200mm was bought used a few years ago and I always wonder about the quality of optics. I like the fan idea quite a bit. Might have to try that myself but need an upgraded mount so the scope doesn't 'fly' all over the place. hahaha

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    Real question is if I have enough back-focus to put the focal point well beyond the glass wall of the flask. Either way, with a 1200mm focal length, the intense heat near the eyepiece without a filter is going to be dangerous.
    Fully agree! Maybe if the flask was small enough, the eyepiece could be inserted into the mouth of the flask but still unsure if the focus would end up in the spot we want. Many things would have to go right for that to work out... I think...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    A parabolic mirror isn't that hard to make, and a four foot foil trap beats tiny an highly reflective any old day of the week. At least for "catching" the light. Like a giant shiny satellite dish with a flask at the focal point, haha.
    Actually, that's pretty accurate. I've seen YouTube videos of guys using a parabolic satellite dish to capture sunlight but generally they have the parabolic dish on a single motor angling the dish on an E/W axis. For this to work, we'll need a dual axis sun tracker. For the DIYer, there are tons of options on eBay that do dual axis for about $150-$200.

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    Oh, side note. If you do decide on a DIY path, tracking mounts are simple enough. You won't get 2 hour exposures of the milky way, but a simple incline, facing directly toward the nearest celestial pole (south or north), a wee little motor, and some clever gearing and speed manipulating, and you've got a sun tracker. The principle is pretty simple. Tweak until it's lined up correctly, then click it on, check every 20-30 minutes to make small adjustments if needed.
    What he said

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aham View Post
    What he said
    Truly, if you have a place to set it up where it won't be bothered, after you get everything dialed in you shouldn't every have to touch it again. The angle off the horizon and the azimuth to true north are important. That's all my mount really does, the motor is just accurate out of the box so that part is easy. This is why fork mounts are awesome and built for the heaviest scopes. They're the simplest designs in the world but rather bulky. A couple searches should pull up plans. There are a lot of guys that will set up their Dobson telescopes like this for easy celestial tracking without an expensive mount.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aham View Post
    Damn! $700 for a mount is a bit spendy but I'm sure it keeps the telescope stable as a rock while tracking with pinpoint accuracy. Definitely need that for astrophotography

    My 200mm was bought used a few years ago and I always wonder about the quality of optics. I like the fan idea quite a bit. Might have to try that myself but need an upgraded mount so the scope doesn't 'fly' all over the place. hahaha



    Fully agree! Maybe if the flask was small enough, the eyepiece could be inserted into the mouth of the flask but still unsure if the focus would end up in the spot we want. Many things would have to go right for that to work out... I think...



    Actually, that's pretty accurate. I've seen YouTube videos of guys using a parabolic satellite dish to capture sunlight but generally they have the parabolic dish on a single motor angling the dish on an E/W axis. For this to work, we'll need a dual axis sun tracker. For the DIYer, there are tons of options on eBay that do dual axis for about $150-$200.
    I was thinking more remove the eyepiece (they won't stand up to the heating) and insert flask, lol. Or attach the flask beyond that spot. If I really wanted to get retarted I would try the satellite dish idea though. It's simple and effective. Even wrapping the bottom half of a flask in foil would focus quite a bit of light if you aim with the neck. Spheres mimic a parabolic shape pretty effectively for the bottom part of the curve, so you would end up with a high concentration wherever you calculate the focal point, and a sort of tapered flare from there. Imagine a tube of light rather than a pinpoint focus, brighter at one end, from the neck to the bottom of the flask.

    EDIT: f=R/2. f is the focal point (distance from the bottom of the flask), R= the radius of the globe/flask (I think around 10cm for my 1liters), or in general if you wrap the bottom of you flask in foil or coat it with silver or whatever, your focal point with the neck pointed at the sun would be halfway from the bottom of the flask to the center. ... you're welcome.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by elixirmixer View Post
    I imagine also, since this is a hermetic practise of sort's, that a properly prepared 'magic mirror' would also yeild slightly altered forms of this/these? substances.

    Hermetics. We want sunlight. What reflects that? The Moon? Which metals holds the energetic signature of the moon? Ect.. Ect... Unto the perfect day.
    EM, that's a yet another amazing insight, similar to the one you had about using the light/energy of the planets via a telescope.

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    I was thinking more remove the eyepiece (they won't stand up to the heating) and insert flask, lol.
    Even better plus the light from the 2nd mirror is fairly narrowly focused so having the neck of the flask replace the eyepiece would would allow the focal point to be close(r) to the bottom of the flask.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    If I really wanted to get retarted I would try the satellite dish idea though. It's simple and effective.
    That's what Macgyver would do

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    f=R/2. f is the focal point (distance from the bottom of the flask), R= the radius of the globe/flask (I think around 10cm for my 1liters), or in general if you wrap the bottom of you flask in foil or coat it with silver or whatever, your focal point with the neck pointed at the sun would be halfway from the bottom of the flask to the center. ... you're welcome.
    Close(r) but no cigar. Presumably the focal point needs to be 1-2 cm from the bottom of the flask

  10. #160
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    Interesting image, we see a shaft of light coming from the Sun reflecting off the moon at which point the wind or air is added then finally the shaft of light goes through a lens and into a container. The Sun is its father, the Moon is its mother, the wind carries it in its belly, the Earth is its nurse!


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