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Thread: Plant Putrefaction w/o Radical Humidity?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    US. Missouri.
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    138
    Kiorionis.
    The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?

    As to working with garlic.
    I would suggest crushing and drying the garlic slowly. That way you can add and control the moisture level.
    Formerly known as Avaar186.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    162
    I had been thinking of a similar experiment. You should encourage rotting, let it rot until it can rot no more and in this way all that is perishable has been consumed and what remains is the imperishable.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    US. Missouri.
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    Luxus.
    Yes yes!
    That is why I wish to encourage the internal rotting which thrives at 130-160F.
    In order to self sterilize while preserving the rotting process.
    Then I will let it drop to 70-100, thus it will rot slower.

    There are 4 decomposing bacteria that thrive off carbon and nitrogen. Each of the 4 thrives in a different heat range.
    The hottest decomposes quickly like a raging fire.
    The coolest is like a warm bath.

    I presume if I can so call sterilize it with its own heat, then I can play with the temperature ranges with less fear of contaminates.
    I will be using a water bath.
    Going above 160F will kill the rotting process I believe.
    Sunlight (UV) will also kill it.

    Interesting topic.
    Look up mulch fires.
    It's dirt that self ignited due to too much heat.
    Formerly known as Avaar186.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avatar View Post
    Kiorionis.
    The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?
    I would imagine so. But it was still interesting to see in a naturally developed way.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    162
    When something has rotted until it can rot no more it has self sterilised itself in its own natural fire. No bacteria can live in it because no sustenance can be had from what remains, no fungus can live in it for the same reason. What remains after the test of putrefaction has withstood the test of nature and triumphed, It has stood the test of time!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Avatar View Post
    Kiorionis.
    The red grass is simply oil of lawn clippings is it not?
    Most grass mix includes creeping red fescue for several reasons - tolerates poor soil and cool weather, among other things.

    Likely what is happening is the heat of decomposition + moisture in the pile is causing some of the red pigments to be extracted.

    You could find purple oil, which would come from the perennial rye grass - which is also often part of grass mix.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    US. Missouri.
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    138
    I will experiment soon.
    Many green plants sweat red.

    It is an interesting fact. Anyone who has lived in a hot desert has seen it. Burned plants.
    When a leaf is half white, then back then red then green.
    Not all plants are meant to be grown in the desert, yet we do force it.

    Pine trees are the only plant I had issue bleaching white with the sun.

    I am a poor ascetic. A simple drunkard.
    So, what is a common plant with a unique oil color?
    A green plant with a color other than red.
    Yes the plant must be green.
    Formerly known as Avaar186.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    USA
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    153
    I've been working with a lot of red-cedar(Juniperus Virginiana) and the plant will dry from green to brown, but if the green sprigs are put in a sealed container, it will putrefy, and it seems quite impervious to infections, even the white molds that will show up on pieces that are not submerged.

    I add some distilled water or rainwater to aid the process, as the needles are kind of dry to begin with, and I've never had luck without adding something. If left to circulate, you will most definitely end up with a thick red soup in your glass. This was my whole setup, left outside to putrefy, I posted it somewhere else on the forum too. I was a giant pickle jar with a martini glass inserted into the mouth. It wasn't hermetically sealed, and it was left outside where it could be warmed by the sun during the day. I think the whole process took a month or two before I stopped it, and ashened the starting material.

    As for colors other than red... I can't say, at least by this process. But I do see a lot of plants (weeds) that have purple veins and stuff, especially when they are "scorched" a bit by getting too much sunlight. One is a mint that I can't positively identify yet, the locals call it horse mint, and it's smell is similar to bee balm. I think nettles exhibit this kind of behavior as well. I haven't tried, but they might make a purple soup.

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