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Thread: Speculum Sophicum Rhodostauroticum

  1. #11
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    The "Spiritus Mundi" doesn't have a "counterpart"... and that's somehow a problem.

    Which is why I think that I prefer the idea of "parergon" and "ergon".

    I know you will agree with the idea that it does not have a name... so it's simply an issue of semantics. BUT I think it is useful to have "words" that make a difference between different states of its evolution or manifestation... as to avoid confusions.

    The names are arbitrary... but don't you think that it makes some sense to "divide it" in "phases" and give them useful names?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    What I specially like about this text is the two concepts of Parergon and Ergon...
    It became "fashionable" to talk about the "Spiritus Mundi", but I am not very much in love with that term because it leads to some confusion (it is my opinion that the famous "Spiritus Mundi" that we get is "Parergon" when we get it -unless someone is using a different method that gives him "Ergon" directly).
    How would you explain, in your own words, the difference between 'Ergon' and 'Paraergon'? The pair has some resemblance to 'Hyle & Cohyle'

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andro View Post
    How would you explain, in your own words, the difference between 'Ergon' and 'Paraergon'? The pair has some resemblance to 'Hyle & Cohyle'
    It's the same than Hyle and Cohyle... Yes, the names are somehow "arbitrary".

    Parergon = the water that wets not the hands.

    Ergon = what you MAY get if you know how to work with it and "evolve" it, or "exalt" it.

    The text I am talking about is quite clear... it invites the reader to find the Parergon and explains that it has SOME value, but that it is simply what he needs to arrive to the Ergon. The Ergon is what you want, but to get it, you need the Parergon first.

    So it's really a semantic issue, but at least for me it makes things by far more clear.

  4. #14
    Would not Anima Mundi the counterpart of Spiritus Mundi? These two terms were already somewhat confused by the time Schweighardt wrote...

    Etymologically, Ergon and Parergon would be "Work" and "Before work."

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3+O( View Post
    Would not Anima Mundi the counterpart of Spiritus Mundi? These two terms were already somewhat confused by the time Schweighardt wrote...

    Etymologically, Ergon and Parergon would be "Work" and "Before work."
    Very few things are more confused than "Spirit" and "Soul"... because different authors (not just in alchemy) use the terms to mean different things. What ones calls "Spirit", the other calls it "Soul" and viceversa. LOL... I love the simplicity of Greek in which it is impossible to get confused with "Psyche" and "Nous"....

    Ergon is work... But quite often it means something a bit different than the English word "work". The 12 works of Herakles are 12 "Erga" (plural or Ergon)...
    And this page shows many examples of how "Ergon" is used in the Bible: http://biblehub.com/greek/2041.htm

    Parergon is not "before work", but rather "side-work", "secondary work".... A classical example of a "Parergon" (unrelated to alchemy) would be the second work of Herakles: He has to kill the Hydra... but before fighting with the Hydra he has to fight with a giant crab.

    Killing the crab was NOT part of his "task" or "mission", he simply had to do it because it was on the way. So it's not exactly "before work", but something secondary that you have to do to reach your main goal.

    As a silly practical example, if you are a guitar player and you want to play a song and that's your "Ergon"... but you find that the guitar is out of tune, then you have to tune it first (unless you are a punk rocker!)... so tuning the guitar would be a "Parergon".

    The sense that this text and others have given to these two words is a bit "forced"... but it does the trick... You need the water that wets not the hands (Parergon) to arrive to something of a higher nature (Ergon)... Thus this water that wets not the hands is not really your aim, it's more or less like the crab that Herakles has to fight with as to be able to arrive to the Hydra and kill it.

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