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Thread: EM's Equipment Recommendations and Reviews

  1. #21
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    Mar 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    I spent $500 on my electric kiln, used mostly for cupellation & scorification operations, and before I bought it I actually spoke to some people who had electric kilns and used them for similar purposes
    What is the brand/model of your kiln?

    I know electric is good for cuppeling, but do you recommend a propane furnace for the first melting step of an assay? The only reason I could think of to not use propane for the initial reduction melting would be the lack of precise temp control like that of a thermostatically controlled electric kiln.

    I ask because I would like to get a smaller electric kiln than my big ceramic one, for better efficiency in cuppeling. I'm wondering if I should just do the large crucible melts in my propane crucible furnace, then get a smaller/cheaper electric kiln just for cupels.

    Or should I try to get a big enough electric kiln to also fit my size K crucible melts?

  2. #22
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    Aug 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dendritic Xylem View Post
    What is the brand/model of your kiln?
    http://www.paragonweb.com/Q11A.cfm

    Bought it about 4 or so years ago. Best investment I made regarding scorification & cupellation operations. It will fit cupels and scorifiers as big as 4 to 5 inches in diameter.

    I know electric is good for cuppeling, but do you recommend a propane furnace for the first melting step of an assay? The only reason I could think of to not use propane for the initial reduction melting would be the lack of precise temp control like that of a thermostatically controlled electric kiln.
    Yes, absolutely, use propane for meltings, and electricity for scorifying & cupelling. Meltings do not have to be very precise. You can judge the approximate temperatures by the glow of the combustion chamber and crucible:



    I ask because I would like to get a smaller electric kiln than my big ceramic one, for better efficiency in cuppeling. I'm wondering if I should just do the large crucible melts in my propane crucible furnace, then get a smaller/cheaper electric kiln just for cupels.
    Yes, for smaller scale operations. No need to fire up a big kiln just to cupel some sample. You want a smaller kiln for that.

    Or should I try to get a big enough electric kiln to also fit my size K crucible melts?
    It depends on what is cheaper in your area: electricity or gas? If gas is cheaper, use it for melting and other types of operations that require heat, other than scorification/cupellation (these are always more conveniently carried out by electricity since they need oxidizing atmospheres.) If electricity is cheaper, then you might want to get several electric kilns/furnaces for various purposes to economize on gas in the long run.

  3. #23
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    Thank you!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Yes, at that higher voltage it is possible. Other countries, like the United States, use 110-120v which would make it difficult to be able to power a larger kiln that can reach such a temperature.
    I own a small kiln, 8 8 8 inches, and it runs on 120 volt outlet. It's pretty sweet for plant works. Haven't tried to use it for metal things.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #25
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    Mar 2010
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    Anyone looking to buy a kiln should try out craigslist or other classifieds.
    Just yesterday I purchased the following kiln used, but in excellent condition, for $280...

    http://jenkenkilns.com/gs-beadannealer.aspx

    It's marketed as a bead annealer but goes up to 2000f so should work ok for calcinations, cupellations, and melting silver.

  6. #26
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    The rapid fire pro works well and is very suitable for plant calcinations. The control is only in farenheight, which is stupid, but it is a USA product after all.

    I had the whole system turn a black on the inside from the oils in my plant ashes, however, when I cranked up the heat, this all seemed to disappear.

    Seems to work okay but the control and settings are just stupid. You can't turn it on, set a temp and walk away, you have to dick around with how much rising time, and it's just a shit to set up really. We are in 2017 and I suppose I was just expecting a bit more user friendly interface.

    Never mind, it gets the job done.

    I'm very sad today because I had my first perfectly white ashes explode on the stove while I was evaporating off the water. Very, very upset.
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  7. #27
    I have a small electric kiln. To avoid carbonising the interior I will heat the material using a cooker hob to burn off as much as I can before it goes to the kiln. A crucible lid is also helpful.

  8. #28
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    Useful advice, what is a cooker hob? Crucibles are in the waterworks, right now im just using half a broken crucible.
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  9. #29
    A cooker hob is a phrase used in the UK for the gas or electric ring used to heat saucepans when cooking food. For outdoor calcination I have a cast iron Gas hob which I connect to a propane cylinder and calcinate the material.

    This one is virtually identical to mine.
    https://thegascentre.co.uk/cast-iron...SABEgIqrfD_BwE

    Then when the material is not smoking anymore I use the kiln if I need a higher temperature also using a lid on the crucible.

    Here is one I used to use but the little gas cartridges are more expensive if you have a lot of calcinating to do.


    The particular image is of sulphur having first burn so it would not be sent to the kiln afterwards in this instance, only photo I could find.
    Last edited by Axismundi000; 07-16-2017 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Typos

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