Click HERE if you want to join Alchemy Forums!

Patrons of the Sacred Art

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Plant Calcination

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,108
    Blog Entries
    13

    Post Plant Calcination

    One of the most frustrating aspects of elixir production can sometimes be (at least for me) the calcining of plant ashes.

    Obviously an electric kiln is the way to go but for some of us, the electric kiln is in the list of things we can only dream of having, or possibly spend many nights on DIY forums trying to build a brick furnace...

    Two questions I have for the forum:

    1. If you do not own a kiln, how have you been calcining your plant ashes?

    2. If you DO own a kiln, what temperature, and for how long, are you calcining?
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,108
    Blog Entries
    13
    Plant Calcination is a pretty large topic. Potential discussion points:

    Do we want glassed salts? If yes, then why? And if no, then why not?

    Is it possible to calcine to a red salt like some have elledged after extrended treatments!

    How do we evolve plant salts?

    The list is endless, but I can't do all the thinking.

    IMO salts are one of our most useful principals, in that they can be used to clean out other principals. So te cleaner we can get our salts, the clearer all of our work will be IMO
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  3. #3
    In Spagyrics glassed salts go towards the plant stone, plant ash calcined at around 550 Centigrade is for basic Spagyrics. You discuss Hollandus Opera vegetabilia on another thread Elixirmuxer. Hollandus totally condemns the Spagyric approach were material is burned off into the air.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Bridger Mountains
    Posts
    1,570
    Blog Entries
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by elixirmixer View Post
    Do we want glassed salts? If yes, then why? And if no, then why not?
    I personally like to consider the qualities and characteristics of glass. Is it easily assimilated into substance? Is it able to volatilize? Does it absorb water, ethanol or other spirits?

    Do you want a plant salt to have the characteristics and qualities of glass?

    However, I think glass is technically considered a liquid... lol
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    4,582
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    I think glass is technically considered a liquid...
    At least from an alchemical perspective it is a 'liquid', in a sense... and much more than this... very good point!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,654
    Blog Entries
    5
    My two cents : Calcination requires very little things.

    First of all, it needs a simple source of fire.

    And a dish in unglased earth/potery (no glass, no metal, of course, no pyrex or it will explode) or quartz. Graphite can do the trick or pombagine also, but I'm not for it.

    The dish will be with a wide mouth in order to expose properly the ashes to oxygen, this will help the combustion and make them quickly burn and being grey, then white. If you have a lot of matter to burn, then only burn by small layers, it is a question of oxygen here, so a big pile will never really burn properly.

    There is no need to fuse the salts, or to heat it strongly, generally it is counter productive. If they turn blue, then you screwed it, because it extracted ions from the dish, and now they are spoiled with cancerous matter. Just a good dish is enough, no oven, no special crucible, no extra white colgate ashes needed. Makes not really a big difference IMO.
    Last edited by Salazius; 04-20-2017 at 10:22 AM. Reason: "good dish"
    Salazius

    http://dartigne.blogspot.com/

    My Works

    "I want to transmute everywhere" ~ The Spirit of Alchemy.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,108
    Blog Entries
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Axismundi000 View Post
    You discuss Hollandus Opera vegetabilia on another thread Elixirmuxer. Hollandus totally condemns the Spagyric approach were material is burned off into the air.
    I have considered that after the fire element has been extracted and our bio mass ceases to yield it's colour, that we then calcine our earth. Mind you, this is just an assumption of mine, I'm very much looking forward to experimenting with this.

    I am personally of the school of thought that plant ashes ought not to be calcined to glass, but rather, as best and as long as you can without it turning to a liquid.

    I also seek a way to calcine salts to redness reliably, if anyone has read anything about this process I would really appreciate a point in the right direction

    Allow me a moment to have you consider... You could boil lead all day, but you will not achieve it's redness, yet if you roast galena then the redness comes out.

    The Fool, in Anthology I, refers to David Hudsons annealing of gold, and speaks of a red colour after certain roastings.

    I'm not sure if glass is the way, although, I did use it in my last Vinegar Ens Melissa mix, and there didn't seem to be a problem.

    RED Salts!!! What does this colour change represent? Dam Alchemy is cool
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  8. #8
    I use these for calcinating plant salts and they do produce a redness sometimes. I wonder if this is a contamination effect or a normal effect in the absence of glaze. Perhaps that is why they are called rose crucible.

    https://www.coleparmer.co.uk/p/coors...crucible/14678

    I'm sure there a much cheaper alternatives but I don't calcinate plant salts that often and they are a nice size.
    Last edited by Axismundi000; 04-20-2017 at 10:23 AM. Reason: Typos

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,108
    Blog Entries
    13
    How long did you calcine for to get your redness axis? Was this glass or powder?
    Join me; on a voyage of stupidity, and self discovery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vccZSHroTG4

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    55
    I use a porcelain crucible and a common gas burner. I let it burn for quite a while and the salts do get red hot (although they lose the redness after 15-20 min). But i am just an amateur, listening to the big guns here would be wise

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts