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Thread: Mold growing in colloidal gold solution

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    Mold growing in colloidal gold solution



    Those jelly-like structures grew (surprisingly) in a forgotten jar that contained colloidal purple gold and NaCl salt (lab grade). No other kind of nutrients was in there. It took many months for them to form.

    I wonder where did they find the nutrients necessary. If they were photosynthesizing they would be green, right? Instead they are like transparent jellies. They have a purple tint obviously by accumulating the purple colloidal gold in them. Isn't that strange.

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    was the lid forgotten along with the jar? Maybe it became contaminated well before the mold started to grow?
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

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    The lid was losely sitting on top of the jar (hence the low evaporation rate). Of course it could be contaminated by mold spores either before or during that time but this is not enough for the mold to grow (well, actually I don't know if it is really mold or something else). Bacteria need some source of organic food too in order to grow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theFool View Post
    The lid was losely sitting on top of the jar (hence the low evaporation rate). Of course it could be contaminated by mold spores either before or during that time but this is not enough for the mold to grow (well, actually I don't know if it is really mold or something else). Bacteria need some source of organic food too in order to grow.
    Perhaps the water used for the solution already contained some organic matter in solution/suspension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Perhaps the water used for the solution already contained some organic matter in solution/suspension.
    I'm not trying to prove anything here, it was just an observation to share.

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    Do you recall the water used? Was it distilled, or tap or...?

    I've seen some strange "gur" style growths inside of a gold solution before. Tis interesting.
    One fatal tree there stands of knowledge called, forbidden them to taste. Knowledge forbidden? Suspicious. Reasonless. And why should their Lord envy them that? Can it be sin to know? Can it be death? And do they stand by ignorance, is that their happy state, the proof of their obedience and their faith?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth-Ra View Post
    Do you recall the water used? Was it distilled, or tap or...?
    I'm almost certain it was tap water. Definately not rainwater. I doubt it was distilled either as I wouldn't use it in such quantities. It was around 500ml that evaporated down to 50ml. There was the "mold" found.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seth-Ra View Post
    I've seen some strange "gur" style growths inside of a gold solution before. Tis interesting.
    That is the reason I posted that, to see if someone else has observed something similar. I've seen it again in the past, but never photographed. It resembles the "mother of vinegar". Probably it is not mold but other bacteria.

    One test could be to dry and burn it. If it glows like carbon, it is organic. Thus, one could tell if it is bacteria or other thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theFool View Post
    I'm almost certain it was tap water. Definately not rainwater. I doubt it was distilled either as I wouldn't use it in such quantities. It was around 500ml that evaporated down to 50ml. There was the "mold" found.
    Well, that pretty much answers the question. I use tap water all the time to blend refractory clay slips for making crucibles, calcining dishes, scorifiers, etc. and when you put the slips in storage for a while they invariably develop "mold", despite the fact that they contain such chemicals as soluble alkaline silicates and barium and sodium carbonates. It doesn't stop them from developing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Well, that pretty much answers the question. I use tap water all the time to blend refractory clay slips for making crucibles, calcining dishes, scorifiers, etc. and when you put the slips in storage for a while they invariably develop "mold", despite the fact that they contain such chemicals as soluble alkaline silicates and barium and sodium carbonates. It doesn't stop them from developing.
    The "mold" doesn't grow in tap water alone, I think in your case it is the clay that causes it to grow. Even in that case, isn't it strange that they grow in an inorganic substrate? Where do they find the carbon necessary for their organic molecules. Usually mold or other bacteria have to break down something organic (e.g. sugar, grains) in order to provide their nutrients and building molecules. The only logical solution to me is that they photosynthesize (or capture the CO2 through other means). I doubt that tap water has all this organic molecules necessary for them to develop. Besides, one could leave a glass of water semi-covered aside and check it after few months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theFool View Post
    The "mold" doesn't grow in tap water alone, I think in your case it is the clay that causes it to grow. Even in that case, isn't it strange that they grow in an inorganic substrate? Where do they find the carbon necessary for their organic molecules. Usually mold or other bacteria have to break down something organic (e.g. sugar, grains) in order to provide their nutrients and building molecules. The only logical solution to me is that they photosynthesize (or capture the CO2 through other means). I doubt that tap water has all this organic molecules necessary for them to develop. Besides, one could leave a glass of water semi-covered aside and check it after few months.
    If you let tap water sit on its own inside a closed container for a good amount of time it will eventually develop "algae" growths. It does have organic matter dissolved and/or suspended in it.

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