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Thread: Fr. Albertus Work

  1. #71
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    Borosilicate glass melts around 1500 f, or 800 c
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  2. #72
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    Thank you, I will give it a try for different things.
    My experiences with borosilicate and temperatures above 400ºC have usually ended up in breaking (not melting) the flask, but I will try again.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    What kind of vessels are you using??? Quartz?
    Your words and videos are sufficient to understand that you are actually doing what you are doing, but 1200F in a borosilicate vessel/flask doesn't make sense to me. That's more or less 650ºC... can you go that high with borosilicate without breaking it?
    I use borosilicate glass. Thicker is better. I have melted a couple and sagged several by holding at 1200F for too long. I've never broken one. I heat them in an electric kiln for the distillation and let the kiln cool down to room temp before taking the retort out. That is usually about 12 hours.

    You can get away with it using a 1000mL or smaller flask because it doesn't take as long to distill the smaller volume. I made a special 3.5 quart stainless steel retort for larger volumes. I used an inexpensive stainless steel baine marie pot with lid purchased from an online restaurant supply company. I drilled a hole in the side and inserted a 1 inch diameter stainless steel pipe 10 inches long as the beak. It works really great and will withstand 1200F and more.

  4. #74
    Borosilicate gradually starts to softens above about 240C I think, so if possible a sand bath so the flask doesn't lose shape. Though using sand bath above 600C could be pushing it maybe, my heating mantle does 540C. Using a kiln with boiling flask inside poking through hole in door to receiving flask I have seen online. Higher temp heating mantles I think would need a quartz flask and they are not cheap.

    Edit just saw post above after I clicked save button. The only theoretical thing I would add is keeping a borosilicate boiling flask inside kiln in a pot with high temp powder or sand to help it keep its shape.

    Aside from the Alchemy this all sounds like big fun.
    Last edited by Axismundi000; 09-02-2017 at 09:49 PM. Reason: Took too long typing

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    I have one big question for you. How are you regulating the pressure. Does the silicone ring at the joint stretch, or is it kind of "keep the receiver as cold as possible and hope for the best?" I noticed that some of the condensing droplets looked like they were trying to escape through the connection at the bottom.
    The pressure is regulated by using a receiver with volume larger than the retort volume, keeping the receiver below 100F with the ability to cool it more with ice packs on the fly, and not letting the temp rise too fast. When I know the distillation products must be chilled to condense then I use a receiver packed in ice in a modified styrofoam cooler. The joint is sealed with dielectric grease. It is pretty impervious to the fumes. If the heat rises too fast pressure rises too fast then the grease seal will fail, but your receiver will not be blown off the train.

    I also use wet formed toilet paper to seal joints of flasks not intended to fit together. Paper joints will leak fumes if the pressure gets positive in the receiver. I also use dielectric grease to fill the gap then wrap the joint with the paper for the final lute.

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by z0 K View Post
    The process ends with a sublimation of the pure sal armoniac.

    When done right you will see the reactions the old alchemists like Lull, Ripley, Hollandus, Kelly and Dunstan and many others have indicated. At least I have seem them. You will have to see for yourself
    Neat!

    What are some ways you have used this pure sal armoniac in the lab, z0 K?

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    And this isn't a type of "Mercury"?
    No, it's just common water, and common acids.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    JDP

    But this can oxidize them, and prepare them to be tinctured with the special solvent, yes? Is that the proper order of operation? I suppose I could go back and read over Geber's work again, but just in case I interpret what he's saying anyway, I'd like to get your opinion on this matter.
    If what you want is a metallic oxide/calx you can more conveniently carry out such an operation in crucibles or calcining dishes.

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoas23 View Post
    What kind of vessels are you using??? Quartz?
    Your words and videos are sufficient to understand that you are actually doing what you are doing, but 1200F in a borosilicate vessel/flask doesn't make sense to me. That's more or less 650ºC... can you go that high with borosilicate without breaking it?
    No, you can heat them until they are red hot and start softening (not quite melting yet.) You can also do the same with ordinary glass, but you have to coat it with a refractory mixture first (mixtures of sand and clay work well for such purposes), since ordinary glass does not withstand thermal shock as well as borosilicate glass and also has a lower softening point (the refractory shell makes it easier for the glass to be gradually heated without cracking and also helps the softening glass to keep its shape and avoid the danger of it eventually falling on the bottom of your furnace and making a sticky mess that will be very bothersome to clean up.) This is how the old-timers worked whenever they did not happen to have clay retorts/aludels handy and had to work with glass vessels.

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    No, you can heat them until they are red hot and start softening (not quite melting yet.) You can also do the same with ordinary glass, but you have to coat it with a refractory mixture first (mixtures of sand and clay work well for such purposes), since ordinary glass does not withstand thermal shock as well as borosilicate glass and also has a lower softening point (the refractory shell makes it easier for the glass to be gradually heated without cracking and also helps the softening glass to keep its shape and avoid the danger of it eventually falling on the bottom of your furnace and making a sticky mess that will be very bothersome to clean up.) This is how the old-timers worked whenever they did not happen to have clay retorts/aludels handy and had to work with glass vessels.
    Thanks, and thanks to Z ok too.
    I've had a bad experience with borosilicate above 400ºC and somehow "decided" that 400ºC is the limit.
    So the information is very useful... and I am thinking about lots of ways to use it (most of them completely unrelated to anything that has something to do with this thread actually).
    Thanks a lot for the information... I love learning new things.

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